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Thread: Alzheimer and classical music, a good match?

  1. #16
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    Good diet and Azheimer's is a good match. I would bring walnuts and some organic dark chocolate https://www.bristolpost.co.uk/news/8...mentia-1492859

    The response to music is so instanteneus, it's probably emotional stimulation. I think, overall probably it would be much more usefull for the brain to learn to play musical instrument. The other way to keep brain in good condition would be meditation. I took up meditation myself, although not for those reasons. I read about it and looked into the scientific reaserch, and the more I find out, the more impressed I become.
    The recent article on brain and meditation https://www.collective-evolution.com...a-25-year-old/

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    Senior Member Pat Fairlea's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    Here's part of that Op-Ed:

    So how do we account for our subjective experience that older adults seem to fumble with words and names? First, there is a generalized cognitive slowing with age — but given a little more time, older adults perform just fine.

    Second, older adults have to search through more memories than do younger adults to find the fact or piece of information they’re looking for. Your brain becomes crowded with memories and information. It’s not that you can’t remember — you can — it’s just that there is so much more information to sort through. A 2014 study found that this “crowdedness” effect also shows up in computer simulations of human memory systems.
    Oh that's wonderfully reassuring! I have often thought how useful it would be to plug into the cerebral USB port and download a few terabytes of redundant memories.

    On a point closer to the OP, there is a lot of evidence that music and song lyrics are one of the last things to go with certain forms of dementia, and with other forms of mental distress. When Malcolm Arnold was at his most broken-down and confined to residential care, apparently he could hardly string a few words together but would sit and play the piano for hours, including requests from other inmates. And we have probably all heard stories of elderly folk in advanced dementia states who suddenly perk p when they hear music from their youth and even start singing.

  3. #18
    Member mrdoc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jegreenwood View Post
    Here's part of that Op-Ed:

    So how do we account for our subjective experience that older adults seem to fumble with words and names? First, there is a generalized cognitive slowing with age — but given a little more time, older adults perform just fine.

    Second, older adults have to search through more memories than do younger adults to find the fact or piece of information they’re looking for. Your brain becomes crowded with memories and information. It’s not that you can’t remember — you can — it’s just that there is so much more information to sort through. A 2014 study found that this “crowdedness” effect also shows up in computer simulations of human memory systems.
    Its a pity we could not have an external brain that could store some of this seldom used info that we could tap into when needed.

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