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Thread: chord balance

  1. #16
    Senior Member World Violist's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by emiellucifuge View Post
    So what do you do when the chord is in an inversion, do you shift the volume focus?
    I don't really know that much about balancing chords. I'd imagine that that would lead into several other factors like style and whatnot. Largely, though, I'd think that bass would generally want to be louder, for a more solid sound.
    You get a frog in your throat, you sound hoarse.

  2. #17
    Senior Member Argus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by emiellucifuge View Post
    So what do you do when the chord is in an inversion, do you shift the volume focus?
    Thats an interesting question. Here's some thoughts of mine.

    I suppose it depends upon the place in the music the inverted chord is placed. So say you're in C major and want to modulate to a minor, then if a sixth chord is to be played in the submediant (c,e,a) before a cadence that signals any definite modulation, then it might be best to emphasise the root over the third even though the third is in the bass, as this might pull more strongly into a minor. However, if an a minor sixth chord is played whilst the piece is to remain in C for a while longer, then it is probably better to play the c in the bass louder to keep the hold of the tonic. For chords not containing the tonic then it might be best to emphasise the closest relations to the tonic, like dominant and subdominant to more strongly stay in the key or not depending upon the direction of the music. It would also be useful to add variety into a piece with many repeated harmonies.

    As the bass tone, whether it's the root or not, is generally the strongest tone in the chord, as it's overtones are most 'present', it shouldn't really need to be played louder unless you want this tone to 'feel' more like a root even though it may be a third or fifth.

    I've never really thought about chord balancing until now, I just thought the bass instruments often tried to play louder than the higher pitched instruments as they are harder to hear underneath the top pitches which naturally catch the ear. Anyway, you don't really hear the bass but more feel it rumbling deep in your guts.

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    Lower frequencies expand and travel differently! You need to take the hall and the position of the listener into account!

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