Page 11 of 296 FirstFirst ... 7891011121314152161111 ... LastLast
Results 151 to 165 of 4427

Thread: Weekly quartet. Just a music lover perspective.

  1. #151
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,088
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Oh yes, you're right. ABQ made just one recording of the 15th quartet and two recordings of the quintet, one with Hatto Beyerle and one with Thomas Kakuska. I was mixing them up.

  2. Likes Josquin13 liked this post
  3. #152
    Senior Member Selby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,820
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Although I haven't had time to post I've been listening to the Schubert (and the Brahms prior) and have really appreciated people's posts here. Thanks for the oasis in a nervous time.
    "I propose to create a heroic, monumental style of composition simple enough to inspire all people; completely free from fads, artificial mannerisms and false sophistications; direct, forceful, sincere, always original but never unnatural." -Alan Hovhaness

  4. #153
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,319
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    ...and it's time to officially move on to Haydn! Please see Post #134 for the formal introduction. Have fun...I'll report back later after my initial listen to the Lindsays.

  5. #154
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    6,784
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Listening for the first time. I've heard this quartet before, but don't particularly remember it. I'm listening to the Kodály Quartet on Naxos. It's been entirely too long since I've heard any Haydn—a great composer all around, but especially for his string quartets.

    I think I'd seen some mention of Beethoven's Serioso quartet and I can maybe see where the comparison lies. I want to briefly note that I think the cello part is great here, well thought out. But I'll write back with more thoughts once I'm finished.

  6. #155
    Senior Member Iota's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    299
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I took the disc from the Mosaiques box for this. I seem to remember someone expressing dislike of them earlier in the thread, but I must say I find this a penetrating, lovely performance.

    My few arbitrary and unscholarly thoughts are that, apart from being a very welcome beacon of sanity (like just about any other Haydn quartet) Opus 20/3 seems to fizz with character and find an almost perfect balance between introvert and extrovert, interjectory and flowing.
    The 1st movement in particular seems to me highly operatic, the way for example short distinct phrases follow each other in the manner of a recitative-like conversation (Nozze hovering in the back of my mind, despite the Haydn being written 15 or so years before), but that feeling never quite left off throughout all the remaining movements.
    And such an affecting slow movement, full of unaffected expressivity. The whole quartet yet another pearl in a long string that Haydn very considerately left us.
    Last edited by Iota; Mar-22-2020 at 22:56.

  7. Likes Allegro Con Brio liked this post
  8. #156
    Senior Member Selby's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    1,820
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I will be listening to the Quatuor Mosaiques performance from their 10 disc box of Haydn. For those interested we will be listening to Haydn in the Piano Sonata thread as well to pair for the week. Cheers,

    "I propose to create a heroic, monumental style of composition simple enough to inspire all people; completely free from fads, artificial mannerisms and false sophistications; direct, forceful, sincere, always original but never unnatural." -Alan Hovhaness

  9. Likes Eramire156 liked this post
  10. #157
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,319
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    This is definitely a work that not only contradicts the "genial, predictable 'ol Papa Haydn" stereotype, but also contradicts the entire stereotype about Classical Period music being bland and formulaic. Though it is admittedly probably my least favorite musical era (not counting 21st century, which I haven't dived into), there are wondrous gems aplenty to discover. This quartet reminds me a lot of the Mozart G Minor Quintet, which is possibly my favorite work from either Mozart or Haydn. I would not be surprised if Mozart studied this work and gained inspiration from it. It balances darkness and light, power and lyricism, and many other contrasts in perfect, delicate proportion. Certainly not "light" fare by any stretch of the imagination, but it is more compact, streamlined and "easier on the ear" than our previous quartets, which I find a relief. First impressions - I loved the first movement's tight, nervous atmosphere and also noticed, as Iota mentions, the "conversational" type nature of the music. The minuet is unusual for being placed before the slow movement, and features an amazing contrast with the lyrical trio section. I can only imagine that Haydn's audience would be challenged to say the least. The Adagio is quintessential warm, relaxed Haydn but is not without its moments of hinting towards a deeper pathos. But the finale is what struck me as most radical - a very short movement, but I was reminded of our discussion about the Brahms quartet a couple weeks ago and the function of a brief, breathless whirlwind finale; a concept that Haydn experimented with here well before the Romantic era. The final notes just simply fade down into nothingness - I kept waiting for the big, final, affirming cadence that would inevitably finish it off, but it never came! It ends in total ambiguity and did not leave me feeling satisfied - but that's what I love about it! The Lindsay performance was immaculately played and phrased, but lacked, as Mandryka says, the darker elements of the music, instead treating it as more like an agreeable serenade. I look forward to continuing my exploration of this troublesome but superb quartet.

  11. Likes Iota liked this post
  12. #158
    Senior Member Bulldog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    33,870
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Op. 20/3 is one of my favorite string quartets of any time period. The 1st movement has phrasing that takes me to Tuscany and the Minuet's trio is stunning. Dialogue is what I like best in Haydn's string quartets, and it's in abundance in the G minor.

    As for recordings, I prefer the period instrument accounts by the Salomon on Hyperion (deleted) and Mosaiques on Naive.

  13. Likes Allegro Con Brio liked this post
  14. #159
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,088
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    The Lindsay performance was immaculately played and phrased, but lacked, as Mandryka says, the darker elements of the music, instead treating it as more like an agreeable serenade. I look forward to continuing my exploration of this troublesome but superb quartet.
    The Lindsay Quartet are a too radiant and fluid for me, it makes the music sound close to what I’d expect from Mozart. I’ve been very much enjoying an old modern instrument one though, from the Koeckert Quartet.

    Re the rest of your post which I snipped away, there may well be a connection to Brahms, I’m sure I read that somewhere but I can’t remember the details or the reference! The whole op 20 set is well worth exploring, I’d be reluctant to say that op 20/3 is the peak. Op 20/4, for example, is full of special things, as is op 20/2.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Mar-23-2020 at 05:53.

  15. #160
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,088
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Iota View Post

    The 1st movement in particular seems to me highly operatic, the way for example short distinct phrases follow each other in the manner of a recitative-like conversation (Nozze hovering in the back of my mind, despite the Haydn being written 15 or so years before), but that feeling never quite left off throughout all the remaining movements..
    Yes, interesting ideas, thanks. I think my only reservation about what you say is that in the performances which inspire me the most, there isn’t the lightness, the fizz, the champagne, of Figaro. But I’m interested in the idea of recitative.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Mar-23-2020 at 05:59.

  16. #161
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,088
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog View Post
    The 1st movement has phrasing that takes me to Tuscany.
    Why?


    . Sxmnnsxmxkwxn

  17. #162
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    6,784
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Wow, the op. 20 quartets were published way back in 1772. Beethoven was one year old at the time, Mozart was a teenager. This all being the case, Haydn was certainly ahead of his time, here.

    The first movement starts off already on a strange note, with the opening phrase being made up of 7-bar themes. Despite being the only entry in the op.20 set in a minor key, it's not an especially dark work. I really love the slow movement, one of the most beautiful cantabile movements in all of Haydn (or in all of the very little I know anyway!) I am not sure how I feel about the abruptness of the finale. Overall I would agree with Bulldog that there is a big emphasis on dialog throughout the quartet, particularly between the first violin and cello.

    Not much else to add here, sorry. I'm going to try and find another recording. I still have only heard the Kodály.

  18. #163
    Senior Member jurianbai's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Singapore
    Posts
    1,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default


  19. #164
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,088
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post
    Wow, the op. 20 quartets were published way back in 1772. Beethoven was one year old at the time, Mozart was a teenager. This all being the case, Haydn was certainly ahead of his time, here.

    The first movement starts off already on a strange note, with the opening phrase being made up of 7-bar themes. Despite being the only entry in the op.20 set in a minor key, it's not an especially dark work. I really love the slow movement, one of the most beautiful cantabile movements in all of Haydn (or in all of the very little I know anyway!) I am not sure how I feel about the abruptness of the finale. Overall I would agree with Bulldog that there is a big emphasis on dialog throughout the quartet, particularly between the first violin and cello.

    Not much else to add here, sorry. I'm going to try and find another recording. I still have only heard the Kodály.
    I enjoyed listening to the Kodaly Quartet play this one, I appreciated the seriousness of it. I’ll try to hear the rest of their op 20s. Thanks for mentioning it.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Mar-24-2020 at 06:07.

  20. #165
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,088
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post
    Wow, the op. 20 quartets were published way back in 1772. . . I really love the slow movement, one of the most beautiful cantabile movements in all of Haydn (or in all of the very little I know anyway!)

    Check the slow movement of symphony 51, written the year after, 1773.

  21. Likes flamencosketches liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •