Page 136 of 293 FirstFirst ... 3686126132133134135136137138139140146186236 ... LastLast
Results 2,026 to 2,040 of 4395

Thread: Weekly quartet. Just a music lover perspective.

  1. #2026
    Senior Member Oldhoosierdude's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2016
    Location
    Central Indiana
    Posts
    1,271
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I haven't read back 135 pages. So, not sure what the process is for each weeks quartet but I have got a lot of listening recently from quartets by Holmboe, Bacewicz, Bax, and Mendelssohn. And Prokofiev on Naxos with Aurora.
    I don't live in the past,
    there's no future in it.

  2. #2027
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,309
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldhoosierdude View Post
    I haven't read back 135 pages. So, not sure what the process is for each weeks quartet but I have got a lot of listening recently from quartets by Holmboe, Bacewicz, Bax, and Mendelssohn. And Prokofiev on Naxos with Aurora.
    Welcome! We had an initial order of people who submitted a quartet, and we have pretty much stuck with that same order for three rounds now (give or take some who have either dropped out or joined in). Let me know if you want to be added to the list

    For this week, the choice goes to Knorf! The following schedule may have to be adjusted accordingly since there are a couple who have not showed up in a while:

    Knorf
    Simplicissimus
    calvinpv
    newyorkconversation
    Iota
    Malx
    Rangstrom
    BlackAdderLXX
    starthrower
    annaw
    SearsPoncho
    HenryPenfold
    Helgi
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art is an attempt to transport into a limited quantity of matter, modeled by man, an image of the infinite beauty of the entire universe." - Simone Weil

    "Ceaseless work, analysis, reflection, writing much, endless self-correction, that is my secret." - Johann Sebastian Bach

  3. #2028
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Syracuse, NY USA
    Posts
    14,288
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Deleted...........
    Last edited by starthrower; Feb-05-2021 at 15:39.

  4. #2029
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    6,270
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    75

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HenryPenfold View Post


    EDIT: I've only just re-read Merl's edited post #2024 and it feels I've duplicated some of what he has said - apologies if that's a bit boring!!
    HP, you haven't really duplicated much I've written and it's all your thoughts anyway. I agree about the excellence of this quartet and the Pacificas are definitely cooler but it's an approach as valid as the Haas. Great Post, mate.

  5. Likes HenryPenfold, Knorf, ELbowe and 1 others liked this post
  6. #2030
    Senior Member ELbowe's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2020
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    430
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Well I guess familiarity doesn’t always breeds contempt. After being turned off by Pavel Haas Quartet’s performance I spread the homework listening between Quartetto Energie Nove, Aurora String Quartet, Szymanowski Quartet and Endres Quartet. I found all of these easier on the ear and ended up with Endres a short-head in front of Szymanowski! Reason for such choice…no idea…just following my ear…albeit an old one (two). I actually grew to enjoy the piece especially the second movement. A learning process.

  7. Likes Merl, HenryPenfold, sbmonty liked this post
  8. #2031
    Senior Member Helgi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2019
    Location
    Iceland
    Posts
    780
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It's been a very enjoyable week of listening and discovering the Prokofiev quartets. I'm sure I've heard them before as they sounded very familiar (the first one especially), but they're still new to me. Until recently my string quartet listening was limited to Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven.

    I ended up buying a copy of the Pavel Haas album, my ears are very happy with that one

  9. Likes ELbowe, HenryPenfold, sbmonty and 1 others liked this post
  10. #2032
    Senior Member sbmonty's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    British Columbia
    Posts
    864
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    A great week of listening to this wonderful work. Very addicting melodies. Especially the one the cello introduces in the first movement. I've been humming that all week. Nice choice and thanks!

  11. Likes HenryPenfold, Josquin13 liked this post
  12. #2033
    Senior Member BlackAdderLXX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    909
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    For this week, the choice goes to Knorf! The following schedule may have to be adjusted accordingly since there are a couple who have not showed up in a while:
    Not that I think this was directed at me per se, but I'm still here. Real life has been absolutely mental of late with work and family demands.
    I'm realizing that my answer to the "favorite recording" question is usually Bruno Walter.

  13. Likes Merl, Allegro Con Brio, HenryPenfold liked this post
  14. #2034
    Senior Member BlackAdderLXX's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2020
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    909
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Just finished listening to the Calidore. I really love this work and Calidore is one of my favorite current ensembles. I guess I'm just going to have to listen to the whole album now...
    I'm realizing that my answer to the "favorite recording" question is usually Bruno Walter.

  15. Likes HenryPenfold, Merl liked this post
  16. #2035
    Senior Member Knorf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    3,153
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'll have a submission later today.

  17. #2036
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,007
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Knorf View Post
    I'll have a submission later today.
    You're such a tease!!!
    “The special mark of the modern world is not that it is sceptical, but that it is dogmatic without knowing it”

    G.K. Chesterton

  18. Likes sbmonty, Josquin13 liked this post
  19. #2037
    Senior Member Knorf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    3,153
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HenryPenfold View Post
    You're such a tease!!!
    N.B. Later today for me might be tomorrow for you.
    Last edited by Knorf; Feb-06-2021 at 19:07.

  20. Likes sbmonty, Josquin13 liked this post
  21. #2038
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,007
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Knorf View Post
    N.B. Later today for me might be tomorrow for you.







    ....
    “The special mark of the modern world is not that it is sceptical, but that it is dogmatic without knowing it”

    G.K. Chesterton

  22. Likes sbmonty liked this post
  23. #2039
    Senior Member Knorf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    3,153
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Alrighty. My choice for next week's string quartet listening is:

    Shulamit Ran: String Quartet No. 3 "Glitter, Doom, Shards, Memory"
    (duration ca. 22 minutes)

    Full disclosure, I studied composition with Shulamit Ran in graduate school, 1992-93, at which time she held a visiting composer residency at my school.

    Shulamit Ran is an amazing teacher, an all-around wonderful human being, and most pertinently for this thread, also an incredible composer. Born in Israel, Ran was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1991 for her absolutely fantastic Symphony No. 1, which was a Chicago Symphony Orchestra commission. It fills me with anger knowing how GREAT that piece is, but as of this writing there is still no commercially-available recording of it. I only know it because she played for me and the other composition students a recording, dubbed onto cassette, of the premiere performance.

    Ran's String Quartet No. 3 was composed in 2013 in response to a consortium commission for a Talk Classical favorite ensemble, the Pacifica Quartet, who gave the premiere performance in 2014.

    The piece takes its title from a 2006-2007 exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art of art from the Weimer Republic, which was called "Doom and Gloom: German Portraits from the 1920s." Ran uses this title, expanded to "Glitter, Doom, Shards, Memory," to frame music inspired by the art and life of Felix Nussbaum, a German-Jewish painter who was murdered by the Nazis before his career ever had the opportunity to take off. In her performance notes, Ran speaks of Nussbaum, and other artists who were victims of the Holocaust: "knowing their days were numbered, yet intent on leaving a mark, a legacy, a memory, their art is triumph of the human spirit over annihilation."

    There are individual titles for each movement:

    I. That which happened. Das was geschah, how the poet Paul Celan referred to the Holocaust. Ran describes how "'ordinary' life, with its daily flow and its sense of sweet normalcy, was shockingly, inhumanely, inexplicably shattered."

    II. Menace. A scherzo of sorts. Ran refers to "the chilling grimace we recognize from the executioner's mask...it gathers momentum as it goes, and is unstoppable." The style in purely musical terms is not Shostakovian, but the grotesquerie and joking in the face of horror is.

    III. "If I perish—do not let my paintings die." These are words by Felix Nussbaum, who was still painting until his death in Auschwitz in 1944. Ran describes this as "an act of defiance and salvation..."

    IV. Shards, Memory. Ran writes, "only shards are left. And memory. The memory is of things large and small, of unspeakable tragedy, but also of the song and the dance, the smile, the hopes. All things human...We restore dignity to those who are gone."

    Speaking from experience, it is extremely difficult to pull off creating art about such a horrific tragedy. Doing so can come across too easily as a vulture trying to profit only themselves, by selfishly harvesting the overwhelming emotions that inevitably and rightly accompany such tragedies. The artist must communicate how they have also suffered, via deepest introspection and contemplation, and how this has changed them as individuals, a change that demands to be heard, a change drawn from the deepest wells of empathy and understanding. It must have a very personal authenticity to ring true.

    In my opinion, Shulamit Ran has done this.

    There is a commercial recording available on CD, from Cedille Records, and also this superb video from the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln:

    https://vimeo.com/248799639


    No, serious music is not dead as an art.
    Last edited by Knorf; Feb-06-2021 at 23:16. Reason: failure to get the video to embed

  24. #2040
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    London
    Posts
    2,007
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've not come across Shulamit Ran, so this will be interesting. Good to see that Pacifica Quartet have made a recording and it's available for streaming on Qobuz. I'll give it a first listen this evening.
    “The special mark of the modern world is not that it is sceptical, but that it is dogmatic without knowing it”

    G.K. Chesterton

  25. Likes Knorf liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •