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Thread: Weekly quartet. Just a music lover perspective.

  1. #2071
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    Nope. NYC, looks like you’re up!
    Come on NYC! This isn't good enough.

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  3. #2072
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    Ignaz Pleyel
    String Quartet in G Major, B. 332 (1786)

    Although Pleyel was extremely popular in his day (that period in the late 1700s when Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven were all writing), he is not so popular today, and so there exists only one recording of this work that I know of (Pleyel Quartett's on CPO).

    Rather than listen to multiple recordings of the same piece, then, I gently suggest an exploration of additional works from Pleyel's quartet repertoire. The pieces are simple, balanced, and pleasant -- popular music, to be sure, but for me quite charming. Sort of, what would have happened to quartet music, if Beethoven hadn't.

    Pleyel wrote ~60 quartets so there is a lot of material, even if most of it hasn't ever been recorded. He is of course more famous as a publisher, the founder of a piano company bearing his name, and via the piano company of the Salle Pleyel which still presents chamber music in Paris today!

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    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    60 quartets! Bloody hell. Looking forward to hearing this one though. I don't know Pleyel's quartets well at all. Is there a link to a performance on this on YouTube as I can't find it in Spotify?

    Edit: found it in Spotify.

    https://open.spotify.com/album/4QEE3...urce=copy-link
    Last edited by Merl; Feb-15-2021 at 00:17.

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    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
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    Can't find that particular quartet on Qobuz. Found Naxos recording of his Op. 2 No.s 4-6. Wonderful music.

    But how we gonna hear the chosen work?
    “The special mark of the modern world is not that it is sceptical, but that it is dogmatic without knowing it”

    G.K. Chesterton

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    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Here we go!





    Inspired choice, NYC; I can’t say I’ve ever heard of Pleyel outside of the keyboards named after him. Wiki actually puts the number at seventy quartets in addition to 42 symphonies. Sounds like he was very popular in his day before quickly plummeting into obscurity, a la Raff.
    Last edited by Allegro Con Brio; Feb-15-2021 at 00:35.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art is an attempt to transport into a limited quantity of matter, modeled by man, an image of the infinite beauty of the entire universe." - Simone Weil

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    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
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    Well done 'Legro - extra tuck from matron this week for you!
    “The special mark of the modern world is not that it is sceptical, but that it is dogmatic without knowing it”

    G.K. Chesterton

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    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HenryPenfold View Post
    Well done 'Legro - extra tuck from matron this week for you!
    Hmm, I was going to click “like” but I’m not familiar with this phrase...a British saying? Or a typo? I’ve already learned lots of British phrases from my time on this forum that I’ve come to love (like “chalk and cheese”) so I’d be curious to know what this one means...
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art is an attempt to transport into a limited quantity of matter, modeled by man, an image of the infinite beauty of the entire universe." - Simone Weil

    "Ceaseless work, analysis, reflection, writing much, endless self-correction, that is my secret." - Johann Sebastian Bach

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    I have a penchant for this period, and I've listened to the major repertoire so much that it's nice to explore sometimes. Can also suggest the quartets of Louis Spohr and George Onslow.

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    Senior Member Knorf's Avatar
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    Ignaz Pleyel! Wow, interesting choice! Listening now.

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  17. #2080
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    Without sounding negative, I found the quartet to be pleasant but a bit of a pale pastiche of Mozart for my tastes. I have a Pleyel Symphonies disc that I feel the same way about. Not bad but just not distinct enough. However, I listened, and enjoyed more, a later quartet work (D369) and you can tell that there's some greater Beethoven influence there. It's still fairly Haydnesque but there are some nice flourishes of Beethoven that I enjoyed. I"ll try some sextet and quintets tomorrow.
    Last edited by Merl; Feb-15-2021 at 07:46.

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    Senior Member ELbowe's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by newyorkconversation View Post
    Ignaz Pleyel
    String Quartet in G Major, B. 332 (1786)

    Although Pleyel was extremely popular in his day (that period in the late 1700s when Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven were all writing), he is not so popular today, and so there exists only one recording of this work that I know of (Pleyel Quartett's on CPO).

    Rather than listen to multiple recordings of the same piece, then, I gently suggest an exploration of additional works from Pleyel's quartet repertoire. The pieces are simple, balanced, and pleasant -- popular music, to be sure, but for me quite charming. Sort of, what would have happened to quartet music, if Beethoven hadn't.

    Pleyel wrote ~60 quartets so there is a lot of material, even if most of it hasn't ever been recorded. He is of course more famous as a publisher, the founder of a piano company bearing his name, and via the piano company of the Salle Pleyel which still presents chamber music in Paris today!
    Thanks for the choice for the week...I have found a recording on YT....for me after a few weeks of emotional tumult I enjoy your choice very much.....not demanding but interesting! ....thank you!!!

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  21. #2082
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    Pleyel studied with Haydn in Austria, was associated with him in London, and then became his publisher in France. I expect a lot of people thought he would be Haydn's successor. His most celebrated quartet at the time seems to be have been a quartet in G Major, B.349, whose melody became known as "Pleyel's Hymn." No recording of a quartet performance exists, but the melody is this: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZDjR8yV_BLQ (compare for example Haydn's "Gott erhalte Franz den Kaiser").
    Last edited by newyorkconversation; Feb-15-2021 at 13:24.

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    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
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    [deleted post, post deleted]
    Last edited by HenryPenfold; Feb-15-2021 at 13:42.
    “The special mark of the modern world is not that it is sceptical, but that it is dogmatic without knowing it”

    G.K. Chesterton

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  25. #2084
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
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    I still haven't got the hang of this! It's a shame we can't be trusted to delete our own post and must escalate a request to the people who manage the site .......
    Last edited by HenryPenfold; Feb-15-2021 at 13:47.
    “The special mark of the modern world is not that it is sceptical, but that it is dogmatic without knowing it”

    G.K. Chesterton

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    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    Hmm, I was going to click “like” but I’m not familiar with this phrase...a British saying? Or a typo? I’ve already learned lots of British phrases from my time on this forum that I’ve come to love (like “chalk and cheese”) so I’d be curious to know what this one means...


    Tuck shops were common in English schools down the years and feature in stories like Tom Brown's school days. They sold treats and snacks to those pupils who could afford it. In some schools it was rationed and overseen by the matron (who was in charge of
    welfare). How times have changed!


    https://flashbak.com/inside-the-eton...25-1937-53723/

    Last edited by HenryPenfold; Feb-15-2021 at 13:49.
    “The special mark of the modern world is not that it is sceptical, but that it is dogmatic without knowing it”

    G.K. Chesterton

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