Page 192 of 199 FirstFirst ... 92142182188189190191192193194195196 ... LastLast
Results 2,866 to 2,880 of 2983

Thread: Weekly quartet. Just a music lover perspective.

  1. #2866
    Senior Member annaw's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Estonia
    Posts
    1,780
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I've been absent from the thread for a bit again (after Schubert's Rosamunde I spent quite some time with Schubert's other string quartets, and listened to Mendelssohn's string quartets after that).

    I'm not really familiar with Tchaikovsky's 1st quartet, but I think it's a great pick! It's forceful and driven during the fast passages, and beautifully lyrical during the slower ones. I think that's the way it should be performed as well, because the music speaks for itself rather effectively. It really does not require an excessive amount of sentimentality because that's already an almost inevitable quality of this piece. Because of that, I like the Emerson's recording a lot. It might be controversial (no idea if it is), but their enormous pace and precision makes it very exciting to listen to. Definitely not a boring performance at all, and technically absolutely top-notch, as far as I can tell. Heath quartet has a fantastic sound quality and clarity, is thoroughly enjoyable, and is probably more traditional interpretation compared to the Emerson's. Bartok quartet has a beautiful tone but I personally would prefer more excitement and drive during the Scherzo, which is interestingly accented. I think they are better during the final Allegro, but there are some peculiarities in the instrumental balance (should probably give it another listen sometime), and the accents are still killing the drive a bit. I'm listening to Utrecht quartet's recording at the moment - it has an absolutely fantastic sound, they are expressive and more Romantically emotional. Also, their last movement sounds huge and they play the Scherzo faster than Emersons.

  2. #2867
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    5,813
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by annaw View Post
    I've been absent from the thread for a bit again (after Schubert's Rosamunde I spent quite some time with Schubert's other string quartets, and listened to Mendelssohn's string quartets after that).

    I'm not really familiar with Tchaikovsky's 1st quartet, but I think it's a great pick! It's forceful and driven during the fast passages, and beautifully lyrical during the slower ones. I think that's the way it should be performed as well, because the music speaks for itself rather effectively. It really does not require an excessive amount of sentimentality because that's already an almost inevitable quality of this piece. Because of that, I like the Emerson's recording a lot. It might be controversial (no idea if it is), but their enormous pace and precision makes it very exciting to listen to. Definitely not a boring performance at all, and technically absolutely top-notch, as far as I can tell. Heath quartet has a fantastic sound quality and clarity, is thoroughly enjoyable, and is probably more traditional interpretation compared to the Emerson's. Bartok quartet has a beautiful tone but I personally would prefer more excitement and drive during the Scherzo, which is interestingly accented. I think they are better during the final Allegro, but there are some peculiarities in the instrumental balance (should probably give it another listen sometime), and the accents are still killing the drive a bit. I'm listening to Utrecht quartet's recording at the moment - it has an absolutely fantastic sound, they are expressive and more Romantically emotional. Also, their last movement sounds huge and they play the Scherzo faster than Emersons.
    I'll be discussing a few of these later but totally agree about the Bartok quartet recording . It's not the most riveting of performances and even Tacet's trademark great sound goes missing in places. Perhaps the engineers were falling asleep whilst recording it? Listening next to one of the old 'classic' performances of this quartet the Bartok offer little in response. The Heaths and others are much better. Incidentally, sneaking into the recommended pile is a super-budget Alfred Scholz recording from the International String Quartet of New York (as usual, with Scholz, they don't exist). This is very likely members of the New York Philharmonic doing some moonlighting and picking up some beer money (you always get clues in Scholz recordings). Its appeared many times on Pilz, etc over the years but I'd never heard it. It's, in fact, a fine, full account and a nice surprise. It may even be the Melos Quartet (a long story) but whoever it is they can certainly play.
    Last edited by Merl; May-03-2021 at 11:09.

  3. Likes annaw, StevehamNY, Malx and 2 others liked this post
  4. #2868
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    USA
    Posts
    3,000
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    The Borodin on Melodiya is afflicted with the classic CSSS (Crappy Soviet Sound Syndrome), but is very listenable if you can get past the crackles and swooshes and you get a performance that is Russian to the core; I can’t even come up with any other adjectives to describe it because the overall style is so special. I agree with annaw that sentimentality is a big no-no in Tchaikovsky; I prefer more “raw,” “windswept” takes on the music (like Mravinsky’s symphony recordings) rather than the “light lollipop” approach. You know, I can actually see the Emersons doing this one pretty well, so I’ll definitely add them to my list.

    Relistening to that second movement, I detect the influence of Russian Orthodox liturgical music on that main, hymn-like theme, and I just love how it contrasts with the tangy gypsy melody in the B section. This needs to come off with real heart if the performance is going to be a success.

    Even though I like this work very much, I still feel that something is missing in almost every Tchaikovsky piece that I hear, and I can’t put my finger on it. I rarely feel satisfied by his music even if I can appreciate it as being very beautiful. I would never say that I “dislike” it, it just doesn’t fully do it for me. Perhaps it is his penchant for repetition. I realize I’m in the extreme minority here, but I honestly don’t know if I can stomach too many listens to this quartet this week; it sorta feels like eating a slice of the same old plain chocolate cake every time without any frosting or ice cream. However, I absolutely agree that he must be counted as the most accomplished 19thc Russian composer; even though I think Mussorgsky would probably capture that title for me had his output been larger and he had not been such an unfortunate slave to the bottle.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere." - G.K. Chesterton

    "Ceaseless work, analysis, reflection, writing much, endless self-correction, that is my secret." - Johann Sebastian Bach

  5. Likes Josquin13, StevehamNY, Malx and 1 others liked this post
  6. #2869
    Senior Member Malx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    4,989
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'll nail my colours to the mast early on this one - I've never been a great lover of Tchaikovsky's chamber music. I have only one performance of this quartet in my collection the Talich Quartet on Calliope.
    So I tried to clear my mind of past thoughts and have listened to the disc a few times over the last couple of days I have also listened to the wonderfully named International String Quartet of New York on Qobuz thanks to prompting from the font of all knowledge on matters string quartet (no prizes for guessing who)!
    I now conclude that I am 50% of the way to having a liking for the piece - if I may use a football analogy this is a game of two halves - the Scherzo & Finale I enjoyed much better than I remember but the opening two movements seem to be stuck in the mud of the 1970's Baseball ground (some may get the reference).
    I will say that the ISQofNY may shade the Talichs in the first two movements but not enough to convince me at this stage.
    If anyone can suggest another recording that combines the elan the Talichs put into the concluding movements with something that makes more of the first half of the piece I will gladly give a listen.
    Last edited by Malx; May-03-2021 at 16:28.

  7. #2870
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    5,813
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Malx View Post
    I'll nail my colours to the mast early on this one - I've never been a great lover of Tchaikovsky's chamber music. I have only one performance of this quartet in my collection the Talich Quartet on Calliope.
    So I tried to clear my mind of past thoughts and have listened to the disc a few times over the last couple of days I have also listened to the wonderfully named International String Quartet of New York on Qobuz thanks to prompting from the font of all knowledge on matters string quartet (no prizes for guessing who)!
    I now conclude that I am 50% of the way to having a liking for the piece - if I may use a football analogy this is a game of two halves - the Scherzo & Finale I enjoyed much better than I remember but the opening two movements seem to be stuck in the mud of the 1970's Baseball ground (some may get the reference).
    I will say that the ISQofNY may shade the Talichs in the first two movements but not enough to convince me at this stage.
    If anyone can suggest another recording that combines the elan the Talichs put into the concluding movements with something that makes more of the first half of the piece I will gladly give a listen.
    Lol, the 'font of all knowledge'! Cheeky bugger. If you want more gusto try the Novus Quartet recording, Malx. Btw, I love the reference to the Baseball Ground (I was at the infamous game where the groundsman had to come out and paint the penalty spot on as it was so muddy - that was my very first City away game - we got hammered too). The video of that famous incident is below. I love the guy with his tape measure and bucket (he appears just after the 1min mark).


  8. Likes Malx, StevehamNY liked this post
  9. #2871
    Senior Member Iota's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    297
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    I’m somewhat surprised that this selection has generally received only a tepid reaction, as I enjoyed it quite a bit. Granted, it isn’t the kind of music that is so outstanding that I’d want to return to it time and again, but it’s a wonderfully crafted piece that doesn’t outstay its welcome at all. I love works with strong folk-music influences as I’m interested in how the artistic/cultural spirit of a people can find expression through the techniques of art music (which is why I rate Dvorak so highly). I love the rhythmic vitality, the seamless alternation between hard and soft-edged harmonies, brusque figurations and calm lyricism. The slow movement really stands out to me as a perfect little gem. Since my listening time is somewhat limited this week, I’ve only listened twice, but my interest has really been piqued in the rest of his output, and I’ll probably be sampling some more of the quartets and possibly the Bachianas Brasilieras next week. Yet another fascinating addition to the incredibly diverse list of works in this humble genre that this thread has brought my attention to. Oh, and I vastly prefer the virtuosic elan and vigor of the Latin American Quartet to the comparatively inert, milquetoast Danubius.
    Sorry for being out of synch with the quartet being discussed at the moment, but I listened to the Villa Lobos and more or less agree with everything you say here, apart perhaps from the last sentence, as I thought the Danubius played with a kind of highbrow casualness that seemed to suit the nature of the music well.
    I only listened once but I liked its nonchalant character, it seemed undecided as to quite what it wanted to do, or where it wanted to go, in a way, but this felt like a feature rather than a bug, like kicking a ball around a park just because that's what you feel like doing. And as a work that gave the impression of following its own whim, rather than being focussed rigorously on a destination, I personally thought it did so engagingly and with a certain freshness, and just thought I'd register another little cheer in the midst of the lukewarm applause.
    I too will be trying some of the other VL quartets at some point as a result.

  10. #2872
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,343
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Duplicate post.
    Last edited by HenryPenfold; May-03-2021 at 20:12.
    My new year's resolution is to buy less new music and listen more to the absolutely STUPID amount of music I already have.

  11. #2873
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,343
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merl View Post
    Lol, the 'font of all knowledge'! Cheeky bugger. If you want more gusto try the Novus Quartet recording, Malx. Btw, I love the reference to the Baseball Ground (I was at the infamous game where the groundsman had to come out and paint the penalty spot on as it was so muddy - that was my very first City away game - we got hammered too). The video of that famous incident is below. I love the guy with his tape measure and bucket (he appears just after the 1min mark).

    Bit off topic, but what was the game where the dog ran on the pitch and smacked into Joe Corrigan's knee and he pretended to be mortally wounded?
    My new year's resolution is to buy less new music and listen more to the absolutely STUPID amount of music I already have.

  12. Likes Merl, StevehamNY liked this post
  13. #2874
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,343
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    An interesting choice, I haven't listened to Tchaikovsky's quartets in a while. I have done my usual and stuck with the recordings I have in my collection, in this case the marvellous Keller quartet. I don't think they match Tchaikovsky's glorious melodious music with the sort of romantic playing that this work begs for. I'll need to try another combo, via streaming.

    I'm more familiar with string quartets numbers 2 and 3 for some reason, so I'm eager to explore this one further.
    Last edited by HenryPenfold; May-03-2021 at 20:15.
    My new year's resolution is to buy less new music and listen more to the absolutely STUPID amount of music I already have.

  14. Likes Merl liked this post
  15. #2875
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    5,813
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HenryPenfold View Post
    Bit off topic, but what was the game where the dog ran on the pitch and smacked into Joe Corrigan's knee and he pretended to be mortally wounded?
    I'm not familiar with that one, Henry. I don't remember it at all.

  16. #2876
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,343
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merl View Post
    I'm not familiar with that one, Henry. I don't remember it at all.
    I don't even support Citeh, but I remember - although my memory told me it was in the 1970s .....


    1982?


    Last edited by HenryPenfold; May-03-2021 at 20:54.
    My new year's resolution is to buy less new music and listen more to the absolutely STUPID amount of music I already have.

  17. Likes Merl, StevehamNY, Malx liked this post
  18. #2877
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    5,813
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HenryPenfold View Post
    I don't even support Citeh, but I remember - although my memory told me it was in the 1970s .....


    1982?


    Not surprised I don't remember it. It was 1982. I didn't go to City between 1981-82 (I had totally fallen out of love with football and discovered the opposite sex, alcohol and rock music around the same time). Trust me to pick 2 years when City got to a cup final and then got relegated the season after. I rekindled my love affair with my local club in 1983 after combining a day where I watched City get destroyed by Keegan at Newcastle, a blind date with a geordie woman I later ended up relocating for and a very drunken night in the Mayfair Club. Those were the days! Amazingly enough that crushing defeat was the catalyst to get me hooked again. I never missed a home game after that till around 1993/94.

  19. Likes HenryPenfold, StevehamNY, SearsPoncho liked this post
  20. #2878
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    5,813
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    39

    Default

    To get back on track (apologies for the football sidetrack) I played the Talich, Vermeer and Keller recordings off my HD this morning and neither the Talich or the Keller impressed. The Talich did at least improve after a broad and dull opening movement but others are way more impressive. My Keller recording didn't register much at all but they are well-drilled. Unfortunately, it's all a bit homogenous a performance for me. The Vermeers, on the other hand, play with great conviction.
    Last edited by Merl; May-04-2021 at 18:52.

  21. Likes SearsPoncho, Malx liked this post
  22. #2879
    Member StevehamNY's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    80
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merl View Post
    Not surprised I don't remember it. It was 1982. I didn't go to City between 1981-82 (I had totally fallen out of love with football and discovered the opposite sex, alcohol and rock music around the same time). Trust me to pick 2 years when City got to a cup final and then got relegated the season after. I rekindled my love affair with my local club in 1983 after combining a day where I watched City get destroyed by Keegan at Newcastle, a blind date with a geordie woman I later ended up relocating for and a very drunken night in the Mayfair Club. Those were the days! Amazingly enough that crushing defeat was the catalyst to get me hooked again. I never missed a home game after that till around 1993/94.
    This is still broadly on topic, in that I'd very much like to hear how the participants of this thread came to be here, discussing classical string quartets with such insight and affection. I have my own unusual path here (for now, suffice to say that a 20-year-old me would be shocked to hear of this interest in quartets; hell, the me of just two years ago would be a bit surprised), but right now I'm just wondering what it is about this particular corner of the music world that brought you here!

  23. Likes SearsPoncho, Malx liked this post
  24. #2880
    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2016
    Location
    Scotland
    Posts
    5,813
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    39

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by StevehamNY View Post
    This is still broadly on topic, in that I'd very much like to hear how the participants of this thread came to be here, discussing classical string quartets with such insight and affection. I have my own unusual path here (for now, suffice to say that a 20-year-old me would be shocked to hear of this interest in quartets; hell, the me of just two years ago would be a bit surprised), but right now I'm just wondering what it is about this particular corner of the music world that brought you here!
    OK, I'll kick off. My forte has always been symphonies. They were my first love but when I came to this site I started expanding my more limited recordings of SQs. I already had multiple sets of Beethoven SQ cycles and had contributed to a blog on these some years back. I had a few Dvorak cycles, plenty of Schubert and other mainstream composer recordings plus randomers I'd picked up over the years, mainly of romantic composer SQ works. I really started keying in on SQs from then and the more I played them the more I started to play less symphonies. I realised I'd neglected chamber music for too long and since then most of my listening has been SQs, quintets & sextets. I noticed this thread, thought I had some insights to offer and started contributing. The rest is history. I'm eternally grateful to ALL the contributors on this thread, past and present, who have broadened my musical horizons (and emptied my pockets of spare cash).

  25. Likes StevehamNY, Malx liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •