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Thread: Sharing obscure favourites 3 "XL" (READ FIRST POST)

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    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    Default Sharing obscure favourites 3 "XL" (READ FIRST POST)

    The third edition, similar to the first two (links: 1 2), but in a XL edition for longer pieces. The next edition will be a regular one.

    This idea is a spin-off from Tchaikov6' Hall of Fame thread. I'm looking for 4-6 TC members who are interested to broaden their horizon by listening to other people's choices for obscure favourites (and sending in one of their own).

    It goes as follows if you want to be a part of this:

    1) You select a piece of classical music you love and that you think many here may not know. It has to be between 30 and 80 minutes, and it cannot be an excerpt from a larger work (e.g. not a movement from a symphony). It has to be on YouTube or similar sites that do not require registration and/or subscription.

    2) You send me a message with your choice and the link. Do not post your choice in the thread.

    3) I'll collect all submissions and decide when to finalize this phase (max 6 submissions).

    4) I will post all submissions with the links.

    5) Everyone gets two weeks to listen to the submitted works and post a few lines on each in this thread (including your own submissions) in any sequence you like. No essays required, but please include whether it was new to you and overall, did you like it or not (or indifferent) - things like that. Feel free to post them one by one rather than all in one post.

    There's no voting, there's no winner. This is just about sharing.

    If you did not send in one of the compositions for this thread, you are still more than welcome to post your opinions on the selected works.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    Two submissions received so far.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    Four submissions received. I'll leave this open for another day or two.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    Last chance. I will start this 24 hours from now.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    OK, we'll run with five (including mine).

    In alphabetical order:

    Allegro Con Brio: Kurt Atterberg - Piano Concerto in B flat minor (link)
    Art Rock: Robert Fuchs - Clarinet quintet (links: 1 2 3 4)
    Becca: Herbert Howells - Suite for Orchestra "The 5 Bs" (link)
    Kjetil Heggelund: Lorenzo Palomo - Nocturnos de Andalucía (links: 1 2 3 4 5 6)
    Open Book: Joseph Joachim - Violin concerto #2 in D Minor, Op.11, 'Hungarian' (link)


    Have fun!
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Kurt Atterberg - Piano Concerto in B flat minor

    Atterberg is my first choice. Was in the mood for a piano concerto! I don't think I've heard the composer before even though I've know his name for a long time. I thought maybe he is a Swedish Rachmaninov, but he sounds very different. Sometimes the brass remind me of Bruckner, but very, very different from that too. I read a comment on youtube: "Why always compare Kurt Atterberg with other great composers??? He is Kurt Atterberg..." Haha! Kind of zooming in on his style I guess and that is late romantic with many key changes and maybe some unusual scales in melodies. I can understand that he has his own style. I'm happy to hear this! I would like to hear some chamber music from him too.
    Last edited by Kjetil Heggelund; Feb-26-2020 at 22:47.

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    Atterberg - Piano Concerto in B Flat Minor

    Lately one of my musical interests has been discovering piano concerti that have fallen to the wayside in popularity. Next to the symphony, it is probably my favorite genre, and I have been amazed by the amount of gleaming gems that have not yet entered the repertoire alongside the big Romantic warhorses. This concerto is probably the greatest musical discovery I have made so far this year. Though I am a bit more lukewarm on Atterberg's cello concerto and symphonies, his brilliant writing for the piano and mastery of dramatic tension and lyricism alike in this work captivated me from first note. It is up there with a shamefully neglected lot of late Romantic/early 20th century piano concerti that include Dohnanyi, Medtner, Martinu, Scharwenka, and Moszkowski. The first movement is sweeping and epic, sort of a cross between Brahms and Rachmaninoff with a just-chromatic-enough harmonic language, but it is never either too grandiose or too sentimental. The second movement I find simply heavenly, possibly my favorite movement in any piano concerto after the one from Beethoven's "Emperor." Nocturnal, intoxicating beauty. There is then a brief cadenza bridge to the finale, which is a breathless romp of pure fun that concludes in a major-key takeover. I hope that everyone else will be able to appreciate this work as much as I do!

    Rating: 5/5, cream of the crop and probably one of my top 100 compositions.

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    Senior Member Becca's Avatar
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    Default Robert Fuchs - Clarinet quintet

    Please don't tell my clarinetist/conductor friend (or the OP) but the idea of 30+ minutes of clarinet and string quartet is enough to put me off my food My first reaction when starting to listen was that it is the kind of thing that one hears in some swanky hotel palm court, well done and pleasant but, at least to me, not particularly memorable. Not something that I would care to revisit.

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    Robert Fuchs - Clarinet quintet

    I'm familiar with this work and I like it very much. Having been a clarinet player in a previous life, I tend to have a warm spot for clarinet chamber music. Fuch's clarinet quintet begins with a lovely 1st movement of moderate tempo; I find it very comforting. However, I am not as impressed with the other movements. My favorite clarinet quintets are from Mozart, Reger, Weber and Brahms. I don't consider the Fuchs to be in that league, but I give it a play every few months.

    Rating: 3 1/2 out of 5.

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    Robert Fuchs - Clarinet quintet

    Fuchs is one of my romantic favourites. Great music for background to painting.
    I like his Cello Sonatas the best. This Clarinet quintet is a bit too airy(loose) but it may be the particular recording/mastering.
    Last edited by erki; Feb-27-2020 at 15:25.

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    Herbert Howells - Suite for Orchestra "The 5 Bs"

    New to me? The composer, no, I have about a dozen of Howells CD's. The work? No, I have a Chandos CD that includes it, but it's been a while since I last listened to it. The idea behind the suite is interesting, all five movements are celebrations of Howells and his musician/composer friends (Benjamin, Bliss, Gurney, Warren). For context, it's important to note that this work was composed before the start of the Great War, that would see Warren killed and Gurney's life destroyed.

    The overture (named after Howells himself) is substantial, takes about a third of the total work, and would work very well as a separate concert piece. A nice variety of moods and pace, at times energetic, at times relaxed. The second movement "Lament" (Gurney) is in the best British pastoral tradition, but with sufficient sad undertones to warrant its heading. The scherzo (Bliss) is short and leaves me a bit puzzled, also because of its sudden end. The fourth movement is titled "Mazurka, alias Minuet" (Warren) - for me, it just dances along without raising much interest. The concluding March (Arthur Benjamin) is far better, with a confident ending. All in all, it was a pleasure to listen to this one again. For the overall evaluation, I did not let the two less impressive shorter movements detract from the strength on the other three, and it just comes into the bottom of the "essential" score.

    Artrockometer score:
    5/6 "essential", a must-have for my CD collection.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Lorenzo Palomo - Nocturnos de Andalucía

    Coming back from Granada recently it amazes me how living music turned into "classical" looses all the spark that it originally has. The guitar parts here are professionally played but have no feeling of Andalusia left.

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    Joseph Joachim - Violin concerto #2 in D Minor, Op.11, 'Hungarian'

    The first two movements are pretty nice. Fun to recognise well known melody bits. Finale gets kind of boring or ordinary.
    I am very familiar with gypsy music and never understood Brahms and Dvoršak take on it. Monti I can take any time.
    This concerto sounds fresh and has some of that fiddling energy I like.
    Last edited by erki; Feb-27-2020 at 19:13.

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    Fuchs - Clarinet Quintet

    This composer is totally new to me. I am a huge fan of woodwind chamber works and clarinet chamber works in particular - the Mozart and Brahms quintets are two of my all-time favorite compositions, chamber or not. So I dove into this work with excitement. The general atmosphere is very mellow and layed-back - there is almost no sense of romantic angst (like Brahms), nor is there the unforced lyricism of the Mozart quintet or the rich textures of Reger's work. It all just sounded very safe and unremarkable to me, and afterwards, I had a tough time remembering what exactly happened in each movement. The writing for clarinet tended to always stay comfortably in the middle of the instrument's range, producing a homogeneous sound to my ears. That said, it is very nice music, and it flows nicely from bar to bar. But it's much more like background music to me, and didn't at all seem to justify the length.

    Rating: 1.5/5

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    Default Kurt Atterberg - Piano Concerto in B flat minor

    The first movement of this piece seemed to go on and on loudly but with little memorable and left me repeating Hamlet "full of sound and fury, Signifying nothing." The second movement, however, was a different matter, as is the finale, something worth getting to know. In reading about it I see that there was a 6 year gap between writing the first and the second/third movements which leaves me thinking that Atterberg really wasn't quite sure what he was doing with the piece at first and needed time to let the ideas gel. I only wish that he had revisited the first movement. So an interested, albeit mixed introduction to this composer but enough so that I will probably investigate some of his symphonies.

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