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Thread: Current Listening Vol VI

  1. #8581
    Senior Member 13hm13's Avatar
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    In the Fen Country

    81tkRiyYeKL._SY355_.jpg

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Albéniz: Iberia, books 1-4 & Suite española No. 1, Op. 47

    Alicia de Larrocha (piano)




    Rosette
    Penguin Guide
    Rosette
    Best Classical Instrumental Solo Recording
    Grammy Awards
    31st Awards (1988)
    Best Classical Instrumental Solo Recording
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogerx View Post



    Scarlatti: 18 Sonatas

    Yevgeny Sudbin (piano)
    Oh! Interesting ...
    How they do compare with Lucas Debargue?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogerx View Post



    Albéniz: Iberia, books 1-4 & Suite española No. 1, Op. 47

    Alicia de Larrocha (piano)




    Rosette
    Penguin Guide
    Rosette
    Best Classical Instrumental Solo Recording
    Grammy Awards
    31st Awards (1988)
    Best Classical Instrumental Solo Recording
    This is sooo very good!!! One of those ultimate interpretations...

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  9. #8585
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    Week Exploration (24) - Current Listening Vol VI early pages trawling

    Bomtempo & Suppe - Requiem à la mémoire de L. de Camoes Op.23 & Requiem for soloists, chorus & orchestra (1855)

    250-Bomtempo_Suppe_Requiem_Corboz.jpg

    Bomtempo: Requiem à la mémoire de L. de Camoes Op.23

    Michel Brodard (bass), Liliana Bizineche-Eisinger (mezzo-soprano), Reinaldo Macias (tenor), Angela Maria Blasi (soprano), Chorus Of The Gulbenkian Fundation, Lisboa (lead vocals)
    Gulbenkian Orchestra, Chorus of the Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon
    Michel Corboz
    Recorded: 1994-06-16
    Recording Venue: 14-16th June 1994. Auditorium of the Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon.

    Suppe: Requiem for soloists, chorus & orchestra (1855)

    Luis Rodrigues (bass), Elizabete Matos (soprano), Mirjam Kalin (vocals), Aquiles Machado (tenor), Chorus Of The Gulbenkian Fundation, Lisboa (lead vocals)
    Gulbenkian Orchestra, Chorus Of The Gulbenkian Foundation, Lisbon
    Michel Corboz
    Recorded: 1997-03-01
    Recording Venue: March 1997. Recorded live; Lisbon, Gulbenkian Foundation.

    The above info was copied (I hope with permission from the early pages)


    Michel Corboz has committed to Disc one of my favorite Mozart Requiem also with the Gulbenkian forces...
    So it was with High expectations that I went into this .... and was not disappointed!!!!

    Very good. This week exploration is unearthing quite a few gems

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    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
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    Bruckner 4 - Munich Philharmonic, Valery Gergiev

    I have only just caught up with this recording and I must listen to it a few more times before I have a fully informed view on it. But on a first listen, I think there is much about the performance that will probably put it up there with the best 4s.

    Last edited by HenryPenfold; May-29-2020 at 09:36.

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    Senior Member DaddyGeorge's Avatar
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    Works by Bach, Paganini, Kreisler, Ernst, Ysaye & Haas
    Jiří Vodička - Violino solo

    vodicka.jpg

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    Yesterday and today:

    Well, where to start with Debussy? I’m sure that many participants in this thread know Debussy better than me, are real experts, can compare different performances, have a vast amount of his music (I’ve got only 14 discs dedicated to him, plus various compilations), and so on. So there’s nothing new ...

    Starting with some piano music (I take the freedom to not listen to every work on a CD).

    Claude Debussy (1862 – 1918)
    Four-Hand Piano Music
    - Six Épigraphes antiques (for four-hand piano; 1914/15)
    - Première Suite d’orchestre (c. 1882-84)
    Olilvier Chauzu and Jean-Pierre Armengaud, piano (naxos)



    followed by the orchestral version of the First Suite:

    - Première Suite d’orchestre (1883; movement 3 completed by Philippe Manoury)
    - La Mer (1903-05)
    Les Siècles/François-Xavier Roth (musicales actes sud)



    The “Première Suite d’orchestre” is a fairly recent discovery with two manuscript versions, the score for piano four-hands is complete, in the version for orchestra the third movement “Rève” is missing (in the recording above – a world premiere – it is completed by Manoury). The Armengaud/Chauzu booklet says regarding “Rève” that the “rising A theme in the lower register recalls that of the prelude to Lalo’s Namouna [...] which Debussy considered ‘a masterpiece of rhythm and colour’.”
    Sometimes I have the feeling that Lalo doesn’t receive a lot of love or praise – which I never understood. So – thank you, Debussy. And I prefer the piano four-hands version ...

    - Sonate for flute, viola and harp (1915)
    Timothy Hutchins, flute; Neal Gripp, viola; Jennifer Swartz, harp (atma)



    Music for the Prix de Rome
    - Invocation (solo tenor, male choir and piano four-hands; 1883)
    - La Damoiselle élue (solo soprano, mezzo, female choir and piano; 1887/88)
    - L’Enfant prodigue (soprano, tenor, bass and orchestra; 1884)
    Guylaine Girard, soprano; Sophie Marilley, mezzo; Bernard Richter, tenor; Alain Buet, baritone; Marie-Josèphe Jude, piano; Jean-François Heisser, piano; Flemish Radio Choir, Brussels Philharmonic – the Orchestra of Flanders/Hervé Niquet (glossa)


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    Debussy continued

    Cello Sonata: At first I wanted to include an old performance by François Guye, cello; Pascal Rogé, piano (accord), because this CD contains only Debussy works, but Müller-Schott/Kulek are so much better.

    - Sonata for cello and piano (1915)
    - Intermezzo (orchestral version arranged for cello and piano by Debussy; 1882)
    Daniel Müller-Schott, cello; Robert Kulek, piano (emi)



    - Trois chansons de Bilitis (1898)
    Sandrine Piau, soprano; Arthur Schoonderwoerd, piano (alpha)



    Last not least some more piano (and listening right now):
    - Préludes Livre II (1910-12)
    Alice Ader, piano (pianovox)


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  19. #8590
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    More vocal recitals.







    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  21. #8591
    Senior Member Ethereality's Avatar
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    I appear to have a slight thing for 'Dances'.

    Borodin's Polovtsian Dances
    Bartok's Romanian Dances

    Found this (sort of) interesting. Here is a short excerpt from Yoshimatsu's Pleiades Dances

    Last edited by Ethereality; May-29-2020 at 11:03.

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    Strauss: Don Quixote, Sonata for cello and piano, Songs Opp. 10 & 32

    Daniel Müller-Schott (cello), Herbert Schuch (piano)

    Melbourne Symphony Orchestra, Sir Andrew Davis



    Gramophone Magazine Awards Issue 2019

    There’s little to fault in Müller-Schott’s playing…He sings out the two songs gorgeously, and the performance of the sonata is technically superb – full of focus and conviction and, in the moments that require it, lyricism…The tone poem is the main event, though…Davis proves himself again to be an instinctive Straussian - his pacing is impeccable and he draws vivid playing from his orchestra.
    Last edited by Rogerx; May-29-2020 at 11:11.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Oh! Interesting ...
    How they do compare with Lucas Debargue?
    Totally different, ( my ears that is) this one in better then his first disc ( Sudbin) but he is growing in that repertoire, I find the recording from Sudbin more technical and better recorded.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Attachment 136876

    Krzysztof Meyer's string quartets are a singular achievement of the latter half of the 20th century and into the 21st century. Mandatory listening for anyone who is interested in string quartet literature.
    Why have I never heard of this composer. Sounds fascinating, thanks for the heads up.

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    Senior Member Bourdon's Avatar
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    Julius Fučík


    Florentiner Marsch Berliner Philharmoniker Karajan


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