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Thread: Current Listening Vol VI

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    Vaughan Williams, Symphony No. 3

    A while ago my local Goodwill had a cache of Vaughan Williams CDs for sale. Apparently a connoiseur of the composer passed away and left his worldy treasures behind, and I was lucky enough to chance upon it. This one by Vernon Hadley is very well done.

    RVW_34_cfp.jpg

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    Senior Member Dulova Harps On's Avatar
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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    Don't give up on For Philip Guston - just wait for a really balmy day when you have nothing to do and try to find a good place to chill out with it (for me it is the garden) - but maybe that only works in Britain where balmy days are to be treasured?
    Thanks for that. That kind of gentle push, strengthened by personal experience, is exactly what it took to convince me that it's a work worth listening to. I'll probably try and get my hands on a recording sometime in the near-ish future. Do you have one you like? I see Wergo, Bridge, and Hat-now-Art have all recorded and released it.

    Current listening:

    image - 2020-03-13T183723.050.jpg

    Morton Feldman: Rothko Chapel, The King of Denmark. Karen Phillips, James Holland, Gregg Smith/Gregg Smith Singers; Max Neuhaus

    This is seriously a beautiful piece, the King of Denmark I mean. Pure ASMR. Does anyone know if Feldman wrote any other music like this? Further, does anyone know why he's called it that? In case nobody could tell, I can't get enough of Feldman lately.
    A phenomenal artist for his time & place, but his music has become timeless I think. I'm so glad to see that it has earned itself a permanent place in the repertoire, if not in the mainstream, so to speak. New Feldman recordings are popping up every day, multiple record labels have dedicated themselves to massive recording projects, etc.... I would love to see a performance of his music, preferably not one of the four-to-six-hour pieces, though that would be an experience in itself. I would say about myself that the late music has not clicked with me yet. His '60s and '70s works are what's really hitting home for me now.

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    Senior Member Helgi's Avatar
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    R. Strauss: Eine Alpensinfonie
    Karajan w/Berlin Philharmonic

    Wikipedia tells me this was the first recording committed to CD, in 1981.

    As it stands, the image that comes to my mind when listening to this is of Strauss and Mahler together on a hike on a lovely Saturday in the Alps — I wonder how different it would be as Der Antichrist: Eine Alpensinfonie as he intended to name it.
    Last edited by Helgi; Mar-14-2020 at 23:42.

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    Senior Member Malx's Avatar
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    Finally tonight:

    Beethoven, Symphony No 9 - Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, Gustavo Dudamel.
    Hi Res download from Qobuz.



    Beethoven 9 Dudamel hi res.jpg
    Last edited by Malx; Mar-14-2020 at 23:47.

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    Senior Member Lilijana's Avatar
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    Default MICHAEL PELZEL: Gravity's Rainbow

    Certainly an arresting opening track! The thick, forceful sonorities are unashamedly blasting away in the foreground for the first six minutes of the large scale Mysterious Anjuna Bell before dissipating into quieter sonic landscape, showcasing the bells quite a fair bit more literally. However, the whole idea of bells, and bell-like sonorities permeates the work, sometimes implicitly through a wash of sound evoking a bell choir.

    This is a composer who comes at music from a very ‘sound-first’ perspective; the foreground sonorities are the focal point almost at all times. Although I usually tend to feel that this leaves me with nothing to sink my teeth into as a listener, Pelzel gives us enough variety of sounds that are at least interesting and structures that have a clear trajectory over time that it does just about hold my attention. Such is the case with the slower-paced Carnaticophobia and Gravity’s Rainbow that I felt like I knew what to expect by the time Alf-Sonata started playing.

    ’Alf’-Sonata is a bizarre post-Ligeti, post-modern piece originally written to be featured in a concert based around the rather quirky idea of contemporary music encountering popular TV series. In this case, the TV series is ALF. I do wish I could have seen this in its original performance context, because I’m not sure how well it works in isolation as a purely audio experience. It certainly is fun, though! A nice ‘comic relief’ track.

    Danse Diabolique returns to the earlier flavour of large-scale works, thick textures and deep, rich sonorities that sustain until jump-cutting to a totally contrasting wall of sound. Pelzel creates a variety of alluring timbral passages and ideas which seem to emerge from the depths of the large ensemble. The ‘dance’ aspect of the piece is sometimes quite obscured, only sometimes rising out of the murky cluster chords and dark trills and glissandi in the form of a recognisable rhythm.

    This is some very characterful music and certainly a treat for the ears!


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    Senior Member 13hm13's Avatar
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    Willem Pijper - Six Adagios

    R-8180487-1456650797-9984.jpeg.jpg

    Willem Pijper, Residentie Orkest o.l.v. Eduard Flipse ‎– 6 Adagio's voor orkest
    Label: Orde Van Vrijmetselaren Onder Het Grootoosten Der Nederlanden ‎– 6802 470
    Format: Vinyl, 7", 45 RPM, Single (1953)

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    Senior Member NightHawk's Avatar
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    Re Roy Goodman and the Hanover Band, the group is absolutely superb and Goodman was an absolutely stunning Boy Soprano - I have a recording of him singing the treble solo in the highly difficult and very beautiful Miserere of Gregorio Allegri. The famous work that the 14 y/o Mozart copied out having heard the work once, then once again for corrections, before presenting it as a gift to Pope Clement XIV.
    Last edited by NightHawk; Mar-15-2020 at 01:06.

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Carl Nielsen: Symphony No.4, op.29, the "Inextinguishable". Herbert Blomstedt, San Francisco Symphony

    I am still trying to "get" Nielsen. For now, I just listen and absorb, without trying to evaluate, or even enjoy, what I am hearing. I am just barely beginning to get a grip on the touchstones of his musical style. For some reason or another, I find his music very challenging. His symphonies remind me somewhat of those of Bohuslav Martinu. I suspect I will be able to listen with enjoyment at some point in the not-too-distant future; either that, or I will give up completely on his music, in peace, knowing that I damn well tried.
    Last edited by flamencosketches; Mar-15-2020 at 01:26.

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    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post


    Carl Nielsen: Symphony No.4, op.29, the "Inextinguishable". Herbert Blomstedt, San Francisco Symphony

    I am still trying to "get" Nielsen. For now, I just listen and absorb, without trying to evaluate, or even enjoy, what I am hearing. I am just barely beginning to get a grip on the touchstones of his musical style. For some reason or another, I find his music very challenging. His symphonies remind me somewhat of those of Bohuslav Martinu. I suspect I will be able to listen with enjoyment at some point in the not-too-distant future; either that, or I will give up completely on his music, in peace, knowing that I damn well tried.
    I really liked the end. Reminded me of how Mahler ends his symphonies.

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    Senior Member Joe B's Avatar
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    Georg Grun leading KammerChor Saarbrucken in choral music by Ko Matsushita:

    I love music. I want music. I need music.

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    Senior Member 13hm13's Avatar
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    Carl Maria von Weber
    Konzertstück Op. 79 in F Minor

    cover.jpg

    Alfred Brendel, Piano
    London Symphony Orchestra
    Claudio Abbado
    Philips 412 251-2 (1979)

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Antoine Reicha Piano Music, Volume Four

    Henrik Löwenmark (piano)



    Reicha, A: Allegro in E Flat Major
    Reicha, A: Andante in G Major
    Reicha, A: Fantaisie in E, Op. 61
    Reicha, A: Fantasie in B Flat Major
    Reicha, A: Fantasie in C Major
    Reicha, A: L'espiègle
    Reicha, A: Piano Sonata in D Major
    Reicha, A: Piano Sonata in E flat Major 'Grande'
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Mozart: Double Piano Concertos

    Lucas Jussen (piano), Arthur Jussen (piano)

    Academy of St. Martin in the Fields, Sir Neville Marriner
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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  29. #1125
    Senior Member jim prideaux's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post


    Carl Nielsen: Symphony No.4, op.29, the "Inextinguishable". Herbert Blomstedt, San Francisco Symphony

    I am still trying to "get" Nielsen. For now, I just listen and absorb, without trying to evaluate, or even enjoy, what I am hearing. I am just barely beginning to get a grip on the touchstones of his musical style. For some reason or another, I find his music very challenging. His symphonies remind me somewhat of those of Bohuslav Martinu. I suspect I will be able to listen with enjoyment at some point in the not-too-distant future; either that, or I will give up completely on his music, in peace, knowing that I damn well tried.
    I would (politely) recommend the 3rd initially (alongside 1/2) as a more effective 'way in'...…..for me personally the 3rd remains one of my favourite symphonies by anyone and it would seem a shame if you do find yourself 'giving up'......oddly enough Martinu is also one of my favourite symphonists and I would always advise 1-3 (particularly the 2nd) as a 'way in'...…

    Early start with Kubelik and the BRSO-Mahler's 2nd Symphony.
    'so where are the strong, who are the trusted and where is the harmony, sweet harmony?'
    (Nick Lowe)

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