Page 978 of 1258 FirstFirst ... 47887892896897497597697797897998098198298810281078 ... LastLast
Results 14,656 to 14,670 of 18859

Thread: Current Listening Vol VI

  1. #14656
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Location
    Nashville, Tennessee
    Posts
    14,377
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Bruckner, Symphony No. 4

    Barenboim with the Chicago Symphony. As Scotty would say, "Admiral, there be brass here!"

    73f4c3771b788c813d983cafe185e58d.jpg

  2. #14657
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    6,396
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by En Passant View Post
    Amazon has been recommending this CD to me. I have quite the backlog of new recordings to listen to would you rate this recorded enough to recommend it? Thanks in advance.
    Yes, I would recommend it! A brilliant performance in beautiful sound. Much to enjoy in it. I don't know whether you are familiar with the works included, but they're all well worth a listen.

  3. #14658
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    6,396
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    image - 2020-08-04T062449.351.jpg

    Béla Bartók: Duke Bluebeard's Castle, BB 62. István Kertész, London Symphony Orchestra, w/ Christa Ludwig and Walter Berry

    Just got this. I'm very happy to finally have this phenomenal work on CD, and this performance is so far incredible. This is a masterpiece of expressionist opera, and likely my favorite of Bartók's works. The reason I never bought it sooner is because I was trying to pick the right recording; in the end I was torn between this one and Doráti on Mercury Living Presence. I think I made the right choice, though I may get that one eventually. Kertész is a conductor who was not on my radar at all (the only reason I even know his name is because his Dvorák cycle is so frequently touted as "the one to get"), but I'm quite impressed so far; I think I'll be exploring more of his work.

    It probably doesn't reflect well on me that I find the titular character extremely relatable.

  4. #14659
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Syracuse, NY USA
    Posts
    12,296
    Post Thanks / Like
    “Music makes you feel feelings. Words make you think thoughts. But a song can make you feel a thought.”

    - Yip Harburg

  5. Likes En Passant, elgars ghost, Bourdon and 1 others liked this post
  6. #14660
    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    11,664
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    Number 7. Sounds very good to me.
    The great thing about this set is that NO SYMPHONIES ARE SPLIT BETWEEN DISCS.
    i can listen with no interruptions!
    When all else fails, listen to Thick as a Brick.

  7. #14661
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    6,396
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Finished Bluebeard. So good!

    Now:



    Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.6 in B minor, op.74, the "Pathétique". Evgeny Mravinsky, Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra

    These Mravinsky Tchaikovsky recordings are effing brilliant. I was considering listening to the Bernstein/New York Pathétique (which I've had for a long time and never heard), but it's just too long. Don't have enough time at the moment.

  8. #14662
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    6,396
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by flamencosketches View Post
    Finished Bluebeard. So good!

    Now:



    Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky: Symphony No.6 in B minor, op.74, the "Pathétique". Evgeny Mravinsky, Leningrad Philharmonic Orchestra

    These Mravinsky Tchaikovsky recordings are effing brilliant. I was considering listening to the Bernstein/New York Pathétique (which I've had for a long time and never heard), but it's just too long. Don't have enough time at the moment.
    OK, that finale was way too short... I need to check out the Bernstein.

  9. #14663
    Senior Member RockyIII's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    North Carolina, USA
    Posts
    1,661
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    verdi2.jpg

    Giuseppe Verdi

    Falstaff

    Berliner Philharmoniker
    Claudio Abbado

    2001

  10. Likes Itullian, Rogerx, Knorf and 5 others liked this post
  11. #14664
    Senior Member Itullian's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    California
    Posts
    11,664
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    When all else fails, listen to Thick as a Brick.

  12. Likes Knorf, elgars ghost, Malx and 5 others liked this post
  13. #14665
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Baarle-Nassau.
    Posts
    29,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default




    Dvorak, Tchaikovsky & Borodin: String Quartets

    Escher String Quartet
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  14. Likes Knorf, elgars ghost, Merl and 5 others liked this post
  15. #14666
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Baarle-Nassau.
    Posts
    29,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Itullian View Post


    Number 7. Sounds very good to me.
    The great thing about this set is that NO SYMPHONIES ARE SPLIT BETWEEN DISCS.
    i can listen with no interruptions!
    And to add: the price does not have to stop you from buying this marvelous set .
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  16. #14667
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Baarle-Nassau.
    Posts
    29,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default




    Mercadante: Flute Concertos

    James Galway (flute)
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  17. Likes Knorf, elgars ghost, canouro and 4 others liked this post
  18. #14668
    Senior Member Knorf's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    1,805
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Dmitri Shostakovich: Symphony No. 5, Op. 47
    Hallé
    Stanisław Skrowaczewski

    (New acquisition.)

    This is the thinking person's Shostakovich; if you're looking for frenzied action and bombastic scene-chewing, à la Bernstein, go with Bernstein. Note though Stan takes far fewer liberties—sticking quite scrupulously to the score—and in some cases this leads to choices I've almost never heard anywhere else in terms of tempo and especially subtlety with dynamics. Common standard choices include playing marked forte passages as if they were fortissimo; Stan reserves ff and fff for passages where they're actually indicated. Similarly, most conductors rush things long before it's actually marked to do so; for the most part Stan shows restraint. It all plays into a fundamentally sardonic and ultimately tragic view of this symphony.

    Bombastic moments do occur, I mean, it is Shostakovich, but Stan clearly felt no essential need to overdo that side of things. Those moments are therefore all the more emotionally wrenching for Stan's not trying to elevate their banality (crass words are not made into poetry by yelling them), when all are swept away in favor of the return to lyricism. The horn and flute duet, clarinet solo, and following quiet passages to conclude the first movement are heartbreaking.

    This is a valid interpretation, in my view, to follow what Shostakovich actually marked, but those imprinted on Bernstein and similar approaches that flagrantly ignore many of the score's markings might be surprised or feel underwhelmed (it took me years myself to get Bernstein's Shostakovich 5th out of my head.) But many new details emerge, and the dramatic arch is shifted in a very interesting and I think compelling way. The role of the third movement, especially, is more emotionally impactful than ever to this listener, as the true heart of the whole symphony, and the coda of the last movement is crushing.

    Other very memorable passages include the early lyrical sections in the first movement, which are lovely, the sarcastic or facetious parts of the the second, which are deliciously stylish, and the long, slow middle section of the last movement, which is wistful. The long accelerando to start the fourth movement is dramatically effective and scrupulously applied only as marked. It's rare to hear it done so, but it definitely works. And, to be fair, Stan does take some liberties here and there that I've never heard before, and in general I immediately liked them.

    My overall impression of Stan's Shostakovich Fifth is that it is more poignant, and laden with pathos, than it is a blistering showpiece.

    I like it. I've grown fatigued with the blistering showpiece approach, and I love that Stan and Hallé have given us something else.

    Last edited by Knorf; Aug-05-2020 at 06:04.

  19. Likes elgars ghost, Shosty, Enthusiast and 5 others liked this post
  20. #14669
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Baarle-Nassau.
    Posts
    29,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default





    Beethoven: Piano Concertos Nos. 3 & 5

    Rudolf Serkin (piano)

    New York Philharmonic Orchestra, Leonard Bernstein
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  21. Likes elgars ghost, Malx, Enthusiast and 5 others liked this post
  22. #14670
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    Baarle-Nassau.
    Posts
    29,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    Stravinsky: Oedipus Rex

    Jessye Norman (Jocasta) & Peter Schreier (Oedipus), Bryn Terfel (Creon), Harry Peeters (Tiresias), Robert Swensen (Shepherd), Michio Tatara (Messenger)

    Saito Kinen Orchestra, Seiji Ozawa
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  23. Likes elgars ghost, Enthusiast, canouro and 3 others liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •