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Thread: Mozart's Abduction from the Seraglio.......

  1. #16
    Senior Member Marc's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Itullian View Post
    This opera seems never to be included in Wolfy's great works.
    I love this opera as much as any of his others.
    Its melodies are heavenly, and to me, as beautiful and wondrous as those from his big 4.

    How do you feel about it.
    Anyone else love this work?
    I love Die Entführung... Not sure though if it's not included in his 'great works'. From books, articles and magazines I have read since my early years as classical music lover, each and every opera from Idomeneo is considered to be a masterwork. With La finta giardiniera as some kind of a prologue. Die Entführung is also one of those rare Mozart works that were hugely popular right from the first performance, and it has been, as far as I know, ever since.

    It's very nice and great fun to experience Die Enthührung live, in an opera house or 'concertante' on stage.

    It's impossible for me to mention a favourite recording. I have 7 recordings of this work and I enjoyed Böhm, Solti, Hogwood and Gardiner, but I think I prefer Krips, Harnoncourt and maybe Mackerras. I don't know the Jacobs recording... that could be another good to very good one. But I kinda stopped collecting all those amazing Mozart operas and its multiple recordings. So far I'm very pleased with what I have.

    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    It's great fun if the singers are up to it. I'm always grateful for the absence of recitativo secco. But why did Mozart choose to write a sinfonia concertante for "Martern aller Arten"? What are the characters supposed to do during two minutes of introduction? And it's such joyful music; you don't expect Konstanze's first words to be "Tortures of every kind"! Not that it matters much when it's sung like this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HnG1WjryX4
    The Konstanze part was meant to be something special, I think (maybe also because Mozart had just fallen in love with a Konstanze ). Mozart wanted to impress the audience, and, of course, especially the Emperor, because he wanted to make the grade in Wien. The first Konstanze, Caterina Cavalieri, was known as a great virtuoso soprano, and also the other singers (esp. Ludwig Fischer as Osmin) and the orchestra were known to be very good. So Mozart was both 'forced' and able to give all he had.

    Which he did.

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  3. #17
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    My reference recording is Gardiner on DG/Archiv, largely because of his conducting, and Luba Organasova's fabulous Konstanze - I can't imagine anyone else in that role now.

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  5. #18
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    This one is so much fun to watch.
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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  7. #19
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    This was the first opera I ever loved. After watching Amadeus, I went to the record store the next day and bought this work. Then, a few weeks later, I bought Figaro and that is still my favorite opera. I've been all over Idomeneo this week and that is definitely up there with Figaro and Don Giovanni with me.
    Follow me on Instragam: figaro_under_the_moonlight.

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    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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    Senior Member ldiat's Avatar
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  12. #22
    Senior Member Open Book's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    It's great fun if the singers are up to it. I'm always grateful for the absence of recitativo secco. But why did Mozart choose to write a sinfonia concertante for "Martern aller Arten"? What are the characters supposed to do during two minutes of introduction? And it's such joyful music; you don't expect Konstanze's first words to be "Tortures of every kind"! Not that it matters much when it's sung like this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HnG1WjryX4
    Are you still trying to figure that out? You mentioned it in another thread. Heh heh.
    Last edited by Open Book; Yesterday at 02:20.
    "No one chooses the tuba" - Alexander von Puttkamer

  13. #23
    Senior Member Open Book's Avatar
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    This duet near the end is great music.
    Léopold Simoneau & Pierrette Alarie"; "Welch ein Geschick"

    Last edited by Open Book; Yesterday at 02:23.
    "No one chooses the tuba" - Alexander von Puttkamer

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  15. #24
    Senior Member Woodduck's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Open Book View Post
    Are you still trying to figure that out? You mentioned it in another thread. Heh heh.
    No one has yet provided a reasonable explanation. but I'm not losing sleep over it, so don't worry about me.

  16. #25
    Senior Member Open Book's Avatar
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    From Wikipedia, the instrumentation:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Die_En...nstrumentation

    "The singers perform with a Classical-era orchestra: pairs of flutes (2nd doubling piccolo), oboes, clarinets, bassoons, horns, trumpets, a set of two timpani, and strings. They are augmented with the instruments needed for "Turkish" music: bass drum, cymbals, triangle, and piccolo. The aria, "Traurigkeit ward mir zum Lose", is augmented by a basset horn.[citation needed]

    The orchestra for the premiere included a number of eminent musicians of the day: first cellist Joseph Franz Weigl, first oboist Josef Triebensee, second horn Joseph Leutgeb, and the clarinettist brothers Anton and Johann Stadler. In the first violin section was Franz de Paula Hofer, who later became Mozart's brother-in-law.[33] The four musicians who played the "Turkish" instruments remain anonymous, though it is known that they were recruited for this purpose by one Franz Tyron, Kapellmeister of the Austrian Second Field Artillery Regiment."

    I wonder if Mozart wrote any other music employing two timpani--isn't it rare in music from the classical period? Or the other percussion for that matter. And pairs of flutes, plural, really? I love the "Turkish" character Mozart achieves.
    Last edited by Open Book; Yesterday at 18:14.
    "No one chooses the tuba" - Alexander von Puttkamer

  17. #26
    Senior Member MAS's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Woodduck View Post
    It's great fun if the singers are up to it. I'm always grateful for the absence of recitativo secco. But why did Mozart choose to write a sinfonia concertante for "Martern aller Arten"? What are the characters supposed to do during two minutes of introduction? And it's such joyful music; you don't expect Konstanze's first words to be "Tortures of every kind"! Not that it matters much when it's sung like this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0HnG1WjryX4
    Firstly, I love Edda Moser in this music.
    Secondly, I saw a Glyndebourne production on YouTube in which Constanze and the Pasha engaged in some heavy petting and a quasi-rape scene during the sinfonia concertante passage. The Pasha was a very attractive man and Constanze was obviously drawn to him. I think it was a very effective use of the time.


    Die Entführung Aus Dem Serail Robin Ticciati, conductor Glyndebourne 2015

    Marten Aller Arten at about 1:13:00
    Last edited by MAS; Yesterday at 17:44.

  18. #27
    Senior Member Open Book's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAS View Post
    I saw a Glyndebourne production on YouTube in which Constanze and the Pasha engaged in some heavy petting and a quasi-rape scene during the sinfonia concertante passage. The Pasha was a very attractive man and Constanze was obviously drawn to him. I think it was a very effective use of the time.

    Die Entführung Aus Dem Serail Robin Ticciati, conductor Glyndebourne 2015

    Marten Aller Arten at about 1:13:00
    This is a plausible interpretive element and a productive use of all that time before Constanze actually sings in "Martern Aller Arten".

    I think Woodduck will approve.
    Last edited by Open Book; Today at 04:51.
    "No one chooses the tuba" - Alexander von Puttkamer

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