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Thread: Most Underrated Opera

  1. #61
    Junior Member Dick Johnson's Avatar
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    Thanks for your comments, Conte and vivalagentenuova.

    Agree that Bel Canto needs a different sort of singer - but I think there are some good active tenors that can do a creditable job. Juan Diego Florez specializes in this repertoire and is always thrilling in the high registers. Lawrence Brownlee and Javier Camarena are others that come to mind. For active conductors, Michele Mariotti, David Parry, Mark Elder, Maurizio Benini and Enrique Mazzola are great with Bel Canto.

  2. #62
    Senior Member annaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dick Johnson View Post
    Thanks for your comments, Conte and vivalagentenuova.

    Agree that Bel Canto needs a different sort of singer - but I think there are some good active tenors that can do a creditable job. Juan Diego Florez specializes in this repertoire and is always thrilling in the high registers. Lawrence Brownlee and Javier Camarena are others that come to mind. For active conductors, Michele Mariotti, David Parry, Mark Elder, Maurizio Benini and Enrique Mazzola are great with Bel Canto.
    I feel it's often a question of the overall strength of the cast because even one serious miscast can ruin the production (to some extent at least) and even a well-cast title role might not save it. The variety is, in my opinion, another problematic thing - take Met productions for example, Netrebko sings in the majority (?) of the recent bel canto operas. There seemed to be a lot more very great singers in the past who all had a different take and interpretation when singing a certain role and thus provided very valuable insights into the operas.
    Last edited by annaw; Apr-16-2020 at 15:32.

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  4. #63
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ulfilas View Post
    Well, things don't really turn out well for any of them!
    You mean vocally or because of the libretto? I feel it is true both ways... How about you?

  5. #64
    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NLAdriaan View Post
    Attachment 132563

    Underrated or spot-on-rated, Der Freischutz is a great piece. It is certainly not as popular as it deserves. But frankly, after Kleiber's recording, there is no need for new ones. Listen to the ouverture alone, the Wolf's glen that is as fearful as ever when you listen to it. The kind of recording that will buy you right into a piece of music.

    I am not that much of an opera lover per se, but this recording is absolutely on my shortlist.
    But there is need for a new cover image. Is a double barrel shotgun what Weber envisioned for this opera? I think not.
    Last edited by SixFootScowl; May-12-2020 at 19:34.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
    --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

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  7. #65
    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sad Al View Post
    Ohoops. Perhaps that's why no one rates Bellini's Anna Bolena.
    No but "Bellini Bolena" has a nice ring to it.
    Last edited by SixFootScowl; May-12-2020 at 19:36.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
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    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Mascagni's L'amico Fritz!

    Flotow's Martha!
    Last edited by SixFootScowl; May-12-2020 at 19:40.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
    --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

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  10. #67
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    Dvorak is a seriously underrated opera composer. Dimitrij, Armida, Devil and Kate all merit inclusion in the standard repertoire. Only Rusalka seems to have made the cut.

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  12. #68
    Senior Member adriesba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SixFootScowl View Post
    But there is need for a new cover image. Is a double barrel shotgun what Weber envisioned for this opera? I think not.
    Someone somewhere online said that the double-barreled shotgun was historically inaccurate based on when the opera takes place. From a brief internet search, it doesn't seem like they existed back then.

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriesba View Post
    Someone somewhere online said that the double-barreled shotgun was historically inaccurate based on when the opera takes place. From a brief internet search, it doesn't seem like they existed back then.
    Having got the Kleiber recording I sometimes wondered about the use of a shotgun on the cover bearing in mind that the opera is, I think, set in the late 17th century. Maybe shotguns feature in regietheater productions, but how they would be able to fire the loose spherical bullets cast by Kaspar in the Wolf's Glen is beyond me.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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  16. #70
    Senior Member adriesba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    Having got the Kleiber recording I sometimes wondered about the use of a shotgun on the cover bearing in mind that the opera is, I think, set in the late 17th century. Maybe shotguns feature in regietheater productions, but how they would be able to fire the loose spherical bullets cast by Kaspar in the Wolf's Glen is beyond me.
    Perhaps whoever made the cover didn't really know much about the opera.

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  18. #71
    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by adriesba View Post
    Someone somewhere online said that the double-barreled shotgun was historically inaccurate based on when the opera takes place. From a brief internet search, it doesn't seem like they existed back then.
    That cover with the double barrel shotgun actually deterred me from checking out the opera. I had no idea what it was about but seeing the cover, I made an assumption that it must be a story about a shotgun wedding or something of that sort. That did not interest me so I moved on. Not sure what finally got me to check it out later, but it is now one of my favorite operas and that particular CD is one of the best performances of it.
    Last edited by SixFootScowl; May-13-2020 at 02:30.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
    --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

  19. #72
    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    Having got the Kleiber recording I sometimes wondered about the use of a shotgun on the cover bearing in mind that the opera is, I think, set in the late 17th century. Maybe shotguns feature in regietheater productions, but how they would be able to fire the loose spherical bullets cast by Kaspar in the Wolf's Glen is beyond me.
    Well they do make shotgun shells that shoot slugs. They use the slugs for deer hunting, probably mostly in areas that don't allow high powered rifles. But I think the gun in the opera might have been more of a muzzle loader.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
    --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

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  21. #73
    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    Anton Rubinstein's The Demon, a favorite of Rachmaninoff.
    "Life is too short to spend it wandering in the barren Sahara of musical trash."
    --Sergei Vasilyevich Rachmaninoff

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  23. #74
    Senior Member adriesba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SixFootScowl View Post
    Well they do make shotgun shells that shoot slugs. They use the slugs for deer hunting, probably mostly in areas that don't allow high powered rifles. But I think the gun in the opera might have been more of a muzzle loader.
    Yes. The opera is supposed to take place sometime after the Thirty Years War. I looked up Thirty Years War guns, and they were muzzle loaded.

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  25. #75
    Senior Member adriesba's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SixFootScowl View Post
    Anton Rubinstein's The Demon, a favorite of Rachmaninoff.
    I don't think I've ever heard anything by Rubinstein, but I am somewhat curious about his works.

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