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Thread: What kind of system is used in this tab ?

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    Post What kind of system is used in this tab ?

    Hello everyone,

    I have been trying to understand from a very long time ago how a compositor (Michiru yamane) used a system in her song : Wood Carving Partita.

    When I try to analyze the scale or the mode used in the measures, it always changed, sometimes it's a C Major, sometimes another scale based on G# and the chromatics used on the song don't help at all to understand how it was written.

    I have attached the partition, can anyone tell me which scale/mode or system used to write such a beautiful masterpiece ?

    Michiru Yamane - Wood Carving Partita.pdf

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    It uses an E major key signature in parts. If you hear it in G#, it's phrygian.
    Last edited by millionrainbows; Apr-08-2020 at 14:10.

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    Senior Member EdwardBast's Avatar
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    The piece is predominantly in A minor (never in C major). The first section begins in A minor, key signature notwithstanding, and ends sort of inconclusively in E major. The note G# is sometimes the 7th degree of A minor, sometimes the 3rd degree of E major. There is never a scale "based on" G#.
    Last edited by EdwardBast; Apr-08-2020 at 16:31.

    Your frogs make me shudder with intolerable loathing and I shall be miserable for the rest of my life remembering them.
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    Thank you very much for trying to help, I am actually considering both of the answers, however :

    - I don't think it can't be an E Major, in the second measure, the author inserts a "C" & "D" which are not part of the scale
    - When I analyze in A minor, same thing happens in the second measure, the author inserts a "F#", "G#", while on 8 measure I see a "D#" inserted.

    So far, I see a Phrygian dominant scale on G# as the most closest one, but again on 4th measure, a "G#" is inserted which confuses me, but still it contains the chromatic notes "B / C / C#/ D".

    Is there any rule the author is following to know how to change or include notes that shouldn't be in the scale ? I'm highly interested in learning this variation technique please.

    Thank you in advance for any further enlightenment.

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    Senior Member EdwardBast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azrayel View Post
    Thank you very much for trying to help, I am actually considering both of the answers, however :

    - I don't think it can't be an E Major, in the second measure, the author inserts a "C" & "D" which are not part of the scale
    - When I analyze in A minor, same thing happens in the second measure, the author inserts a "F#", "G#", while on 8 measure I see a "D#" inserted.
    As I said, it begins in A minor (the key of A minor), hence the C and D naturals. The F# and G# in measure 2 are also in A minor. They're the normal raised 6th and 7th degrees in an ascending melodic minor scale.

    The first section ends in E major (inconclusively). The D# is exactly what one would expect in E major — it's the 3rd of the dominant chord. All of the notes are in the "right scales" — but you shouldn't be focusing on scales! Music in the key of A minor can include any of the 12 chromatic pitches, depending on how they're used. For example, that D# could also be analyzed in A minor, as part of a V/V chord.

    Quote Originally Posted by Azrayel View Post
    So far, I see a Phrygian dominant scale on G# as the most closest one, but again on 4th measure, a "G#" is inserted which confuses me, but still it contains the chromatic notes "B / C / C#/ D".
    No, no, no. It has nothing to do with any Phrygian scale.

    Quote Originally Posted by Azrayel View Post
    Is there any rule the author is following to know how to change or include notes that shouldn't be in the scale ? I'm highly interested in learning this variation technique please.

    Thank you in advance for any further enlightenment.
    It's not a variation technique. It's basic harmonic and scale theory. You are confused about the function of scales and the relationship between keys and scales. You are in need of a basic harmony course, that is, Theory 101.
    Last edited by EdwardBast; Apr-12-2020 at 21:32.

    Your frogs make me shudder with intolerable loathing and I shall be miserable for the rest of my life remembering them.
    — Mikhail Bulgakov, The Fatal Eggs

    Originality is a device untalented people use to impress other untalented people and to protect themselves from talented people.
    — Basil Valentine

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