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Thread: SS 02.05.20 - Schuman #3

  1. #16
    Senior Member Joachim Raff's Avatar
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    Not really my cup of tea but find Bernstein's Live version more palatable. The strings on the 1st recording are a little too harsh for for my ears.

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  3. #17
    Senior Member arpeggio's Avatar
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    I was at a performance of the National Symphony when Slatkin was still the director.

    It turns out Schuman made some cuts to the Symphony after the premier based on suggestions from Koussevitzky. Most of the cuts were in the second movement. The original parts are maintained at the Library of Congress. Slatkin received permission from the Schuman's estate to preform the original. Wow. With the restored sections the Symphony is even more effective. The Circle Critics award was for the original. Joseph Polisi discussed these cuts in his biography of Schuman.

    Since I started playing the bass clarinet again I had to learn that awesome solo.
    It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious. And I am a very ingenious fellow

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    Senior Member arpeggio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Merl View Post
    I have this one so I'll go with it.

    Attachment 135122
    I prefer this one too.
    It is impossible to make anything foolproof because fools are so ingenious. And I am a very ingenious fellow

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  7. #19
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    My choice:



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  9. #20
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    Seems to be a popular choice.
    "A government big enough to give you everything you want, is a government big enough to take away everything that you have." Thomas Jefferson

    “A wise and frugal government, which shall leave men free to regulate their own pursuits of industry and improvement, and shall not take from the mouth of labor the bread it has earned — this is the sum of good government.” – Thomas Jefferson, First Inaugural Address, 1801

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  11. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Johnnie Burgess View Post
    Seems to be a popular choice.
    That's Bernstein I...an excellent choice.

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  13. #22
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
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    Listened to Bernstein's first recording. I thought I’d heard this before but I guess not. Was I thinking of Roy Harris’s 3rd? Maybe so. Anyway…

    It’s big and noisy (most of it) and more than a little bit rowdy. It has the sound of a lot of American music in the mid-century – not Coplandish exactly, but certainly optimistic and brooking no doubt or hesitation. There’s no soul-searching here, no pauses for deep reflection, no shadows stealing over the sun a la Mozart. Subtle, it’s not.

    Well, the Chorale section seems reserved and maybe a little sad, but it has a sense of formality that makes it seem those emotions are merely being written about and not really experienced by either the author or the listener. In any event the exuberant final Toccata banishes any questions with a blaze of glorious noise. Listen throughout the symphony for several impressive solo passages. I was particularly struck by percussion, flute, and trumpet solos.

    A very good symphony of a moderately modern persuasion, quite satisfying and a fine listen – and certainly worthy of repeat hearings.


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  15. #23
    Senior Member Simplicissimus's Avatar
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    What a wonderful symphony! I'm so glad to have had this introduction to it. Before this week I've only known Schuman through his Song of Orpheus. I find the rhythms and orchestral textures in his Symphony No. 3 sometimes similar to Hindemith and Bernard Herrmann, whose work I know better than Schuman's. I'm looking forward to buying a recording of this work and to delving further into Schuman.
    Last edited by Simplicissimus; May-06-2020 at 13:41.

  16. #24
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    The greatest American symphony. Bernstein 1960 beats all other performances. Ormandy actually recorded it in 1951.

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    Quote Originally Posted by sstucky View Post
    The greatest American symphony. Bernstein 1960 beats all other performances. Ormandy actually recorded it in 1951.
    Yes, it's my pick for "Great American Symphony"...Bernstein I is a terrific recording...so is Slatkin/CSO live from 1986 [CSO - Archival Set - CSO in 20 the Century] - both performances are totally superb. Wouldn't want to be without either.

    I've never heard the Ormandy....I have the Schuman 6 he did in the 50s...it's good....not fantastic.

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  19. #26
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    I didn’t know that the Ormandy existed until I found the LP in a secondhand bookstore. It is interesting; he takes the Toccata faster than Bernstein, but the rim shots at the end are pallid compared to LB’s thwacks.

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  21. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstucky View Post
    I didn’t know that the Ormandy existed until I found the LP in a secondhand bookstore. It is interesting; he takes the Toccata faster than Bernstein, but the rim shots at the end are pallid compared to LB’s thwacks.
    Schuman 3 really requires a "heavy metal" orchestra to do it justice....there are some huge sonorities, the closing section of Part I, and the final section of Part II....Chicago and NYPO are certainly top candidates for the job....I'd like to hear the Ormandy, Schwarz/Seattle and the Previn/LSO efforts

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  23. #28
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    It's nice to have a thread on Schuman, who wrote some very fine symphonies, shorter works, too....his #3 is probably his greatest (he withdrew the first two), but the rest are very powerful as well...a little tougher to realize than #3, but well worth the effort...
    Also, it's nice to have an orchestral thread that, hopefully, won't degenerate into yet another karajan/furtwangler episode...

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  25. #29
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    There is a 1938 radio recording of his No. 2 in the archives of the University of Texas. They made a copy for me for a hefty price. It is not a crowd pleaser. One movement, about 18 minutes, lots of pedal point and dissonance. A few moments toward the end that sound like Roy Harris. The recording is very poor with some total dropouts. It is amazing how much he matured in three years.

  26. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by sstucky View Post
    There is a 1938 radio recording of his No. 2 in the archives of the University of Texas. They made a copy for me for a hefty price. It is not a crowd pleaser. One movement, about 18 minutes, lots of pedal point and dissonance. A few moments toward the end that sound like Roy Harris. The recording is very poor with some total dropouts. It is amazing how much he matured in three years.
    Interesting!! Schuman did study with Harris, so the similarity is not surprising....the pedal points were to become something of a trademark, and Schuman uses it to great effect in Sym #3...I guess the first 2 symphonies actrually did get performed, but he withdrew them....

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