Banner: The symphonic suite Cantabile

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 16 to 19 of 19

Thread: SS 16.05.20 - Hanson #4

  1. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    2,828
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Merl View Post
    Yep, this one for me too. Just dug it outta the CD racks. This one always reminds me of Sibelius. Not played it in a long time.
    I usually classify Hanson with Sibelius and Nielsen, all Scandinavians (yes, Hanson was American, of Scandinavian descent)....they all have that somewhat similar sound and orchestration...
    I played Hanson's 2nd, with the composer conducting, at school.
    Last edited by Heck148; May-16-2020 at 14:14.

  2. Likes Joe B liked this post
  3. #17
    Senior Member Joe B's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2017
    Location
    Astral Plane 7-B
    Posts
    4,876
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Heck148 View Post
    I usually classify Hanson with Sibelius and Nielsen, all Scandinavians (yes, Hanson was American, of Scandinavian descent)....they all have that somewhat similar sound and orchestration...
    I played Hanson's 2nd, with the composer conducting, at school.
    I love music. I want music. I need music.

  4. #18
    Senior Member KenOC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    SoCal, USA
    Posts
    19,997
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    This symphony is about 26 minutes long. Although the movements are named for sections of the requiem mass, it is entirely instrumental. I had never heard it before and listened to the Schwarz/Seattle performance a couple of time. The symphony improved, a lot, on second hearing. Here are my impressions.

    1 Kyrie: Distinctive triplets underlie polytonal passages mostly in the horns and strings. The music, gloomy, grows intense and then fades, a pattern for most of this movement. A long and striking contrapuntal passage for the trumpet and woodwinds stands out. Much is made of the main theme after that. The triplets, now clearly in the percussion, return for the final pages, seeing the movement through to its somewhat inconclusive close.

    2 Requiescat: Plucked strings (now in 4/4) time underlie a purely Sibelian theme, giving a purely Sibelian effect. Never a bad thing in my book. Mostly peaceful, there is again the pattern of swelling and then fading. Lots of fine music here. But again, no closure.

    3 Dies Irae: A brief “scherzo” with a theme seemingly borrowed from the Rite of Spring. Rhythmically the most incisive music so far. Complex and interesting, with essentially no close at all. Do I sense a pattern here?

    4 Lux Aeterna: Opens softly and lushly, soon growing quite agitated. Brass choirs try to smooth things down, with some success. The opening music returns, introducing (finally!) a mysterious but peaceful ending.

    A really fine symphony, and I thank SS for introducing me to it.
    Last edited by KenOC; May-17-2020 at 23:23.


  5. #19
    Senior Member Haydn man's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2014
    Location
    Lancashire UK
    Posts
    2,393
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Great little analysis Ken
    Definite echoes of Sibelius in there for me too
    Another SS success
    Listen to me when I'm talking to you boy!

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •