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Thread: Top 5 Requiems?

  1. #121
    Junior Member Aquos's Avatar
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    1. Brahms
    2. Berlioz
    3. Victoria
    4. Mozart
    5. Schnittke

  2. #122
    Senior Member Neo Romanza's Avatar
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    In no order:

    Durufle, Faure, Berlioz, Brahms, Britten
    "When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

  3. #123
    Junior Member Aquos's Avatar
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    For me that I am a requiem lover... I have like 30 different requeims in my computer, I think that Brahms and Berlioz are the more profound requiems i have ever heard.

    Yesterday I found a very courious requiem in a form of lieder cycle... I found it very interesting... I actually loved it! It is the requiem of Albert Schnelzer.

  4. #124
    Senior Member Selby's Avatar
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    After having given it some thought:

    1. Faure

    2. Brahms
    3. Howells
    4. Saint-Saens
    5. Cherubini

    Honorable mentions to Victoria, Durufle, Tavener, Ligeti, Mozart, & Schnittke.
    I'll revist this next year and tweak.

  5. #125
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    I've sung in these, and really liked them:

    Mozart
    Faure
    Berlioz
    Brahms

    and another requiem I like but haven't sung, Mahler.

    What blew me away? Standing there in the chorus (myself a bass/baritione), singing that amazing "Kyrie" from the Mozart requiem. As with all fugal compositions, you can become swept up into the rhythm and the energy is indescribable.

    Those of you who've actually sung choral music will appreciate what this can do to you. Those who haven't, I can attest to this: if you think you've felt the immense energy of simply being in the audience and hearing something like Messiah or a great requiem, I will say that actually singing the music is easily a quantum jump beyond. You're transformed and you are no longer an individual, but a spark helping power an immense engine. And fugues are particularly electric, as you can guess.

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  7. #126
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    Quote Originally Posted by katdad View Post
    and another requiem I like but haven't sung, Mahler.
    ???

    You mean the "Resurrection" Symphony? Mahler never wrote a mass because he could not in good faith set the words of the credo (no pun intended).

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  9. #127
    Senior Member Novelette's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neo Romanza View Post
    In no order:

    Durufle, Faure, Berlioz, Brahms, Britten
    Great list, there!

    With Berlioz's requiem, I adore the offortorium especially. The Dies Irae movement is really good for stressful days, and is a remarkably dramatic depiction of the end of days, but it isn't the high point of the work, in my opinion. Sometimes when I have suggested the requiem to an acquaintance, they seem to stop at Dies Irae and continue no further.

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  11. #128
    Senior Member Neo Romanza's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Novelette View Post
    Great list, there!

    With Berlioz's requiem, I adore the offortorium especially. The Dies Irae movement is really good for stressful days, and is a remarkably dramatic depiction of the end of days, but it isn't the high point of the work, in my opinion. Sometimes when I have suggested the requiem to an acquaintance, they seem to stop at Dies Irae and continue no further.
    Berlioz's Requiem is such a masterpiece. I haven't listened to the work in years. I may have to change this very soon. I think I'll break out the old Colin Davis/LSO recording. Davis was, for me, the undisputed king of Berlioz conductors.
    "When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

  12. #129
    Senior Member Novelette's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Neo Romanza View Post
    Berlioz's Requiem is such a masterpiece. I haven't listened to the work in years. I may have to change this very soon. I think I'll break out the old Colin Davis/LSO recording. Davis was, for me, the undisputed king of Berlioz conductors.
    Wholeheartedly agreed, NR!

    May he rest in peace.

  13. #130
    Senior Member belfastboy's Avatar
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    DURUFLE REQUIEM - excellent.....

    “Never wrestle with pigs. You both get dirty and the pig likes it.”
    George Bernard Shaw

  14. #131
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    My choice is:

    Mozart
    Brahms
    Faure
    Sainst Saens
    Victoria

    Now someone above mentioned requiems by Sammartini and Franck. I searched Amazon and Youtube and there is no trace to any of them!!!

    Benny

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  16. #132
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mahlerian View Post
    ???

    You mean the "Resurrection" Symphony? Mahler never wrote a mass because he could not in good faith set the words of the credo (no pun intended).
    A case of brain fade on my part, and being in a hurry. I'd meant Saint-Saens. Duh.

  17. #133
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    Can't one edit past messages?
    I changed my mind. My fifth name is Andrew Lloyd Webber.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOWm_...30F30B7446CC48

  18. #134
    DrMike
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    I posted here long ago. I'm going to post again - I don't know if my list has changed.

    J.C. Bach
    Mozart
    Faure
    Biber
    Brahms

    Can't believe I don't yet own the Dvorak yet!

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  20. #135
    Senior Member Cosmos's Avatar
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    I really don't listen to a lot of requiems...so my list is

    Mozart
    Faure
    Brahms
    Verdi (though it sounds more secular opera than sacred mass)

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