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Thread: Who is the biggest “one hit wonder” of classical music?

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    Default Who is the biggest “one hit wonder” of classical music?

    I would say Carl Orff, for Carmina Burana, because that is the only work of his that is really ever performed. What do you say?

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    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    Orff is a good choice. Pachelbel is also up there - what ever gets played outside his Canon?
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Rock View Post
    Orff is a good choice. Pachelbel is also up there - what ever gets played outside his Canon?
    His organ works get decent exposure on recordings. There are at least 2 complete cycles on cd - Centaur and Dorian. However, they might be out-of-print by now.

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    Yeah, but I also accumulated (somehow) nine Orff CD's that do not feature the Carmina Burana.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Franz von Suppé, as the only work of his I’ve ever heard about being performed is the Light Cavalry ouverture. One might also argue that Mussorgsky belongs to this category as well (or maybe he should be described as a «two hit wonder»).

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    Suppé's overture Dichter und Bauer is about as famous as Light Cavalry. Mussorgsky as a one hit wonder (or even two hit wonder) is a joke, I hope.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mahlernerd View Post
    I would say Carl Orff, for Carmina Burana, because that is the only work of his that is really ever performed. What do you say?
    Not only that, but the opening O Fortuna is far more famous than everything else on Carmina Burana - it's the Spirit in the Sky or the Brown Eyed Girl of the classical world.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Rock View Post
    Suppé's overture Dichter und Bauer is about as famous as Light Cavalry. Mussorgsky as a one hit wonder (or even two hit wonder) is a joke, I hope.
    I did not know that. Never heard about it though. You are correct in identifying the last statement as a joke.

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    Senior Member consuono's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    Not only that, but the opening O Fortuna is far more famous than everything else on Carmina Burana - it's the Spirit in the Sky or the Brown Eyed Girl of the classical world.
    Oh no. You surely didn't just call Van Morrison a one-hit wonder, did you?

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    Julius Fučík and his "Entry Of The Gladiators"

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    Just looking at the figures though...

    Entry Of The Gladiators 19 recordings
    Florentiner 14 recordings

    But I agree, I know the Gladiators and not the Florentiner.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Senior Member consuono's Avatar
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    I'd nominate Paderewski and his Minuet. His other works may be quite worthy but I've never heard them.

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    Maybe Masgacni can be mentioned for Cavalleria Rustianaca. He wrote 14 stage works, but this is just about all he is remembered for (even worse, La Maschere has the distinction of a simultaneous premiere in seven cities, where five featured hisses and whistles, and the sixth city wouldn't even let it play all the way through.)

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by consuono View Post
    Oh no. You surely didn't just call Van Morrison a one-hit wonder, did you?
    He pretty much is in the UK - on the radio or at any karaoke near you it's the only thing you are likely to hear, and it wasn't even a hit when it was released. I used Morrison and Norman Greenbaum as examples because their most famous singles were also right at the beginning of their solo careers - Carmina Burana was also Orff's first 'proper' non-educational work.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Senior Member consuono's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    He pretty much is in the UK - on the radio or at any karaoke near you it's the only thing you are likely to hear, and it wasn't even a hit when it was released. I used Morrison and Norman Greenbaum as examples because their most famous singles were also right at the beginning of their solo careers - Carmina Burana was also Orff's first 'proper' non-educational work.
    I dunno. I've heard Morrison's "Gloria" pretty often as well...from the Doors and Hendrix too. And "Domino" and "Tupelo Honey" and "Wild Night" and "Into the Mystic" and "Have I Told You Lately"...I love Van the Man.

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