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Thread: Personal blind spots

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethereality View Post
    Germanic Romantic in general. While I'm heavily drawn to any of the surrounding nations, there's even something about symphonic music in general that can be off-putting: it feels like it's well-thought, but just way too heavy, in harmonic stiffness and emotions, and needs much more 'instrumental subtlety' and 'harmonic casualness' closer to Folk Classical or vaguely even sounding like this https://youtu.be/CYYSZ22Svbg I say vaguely, because this example is very boring. Complexity in classical is essential, but when it comes to just orchestration, this interpretation is vaguely more complete in its Neo-Renaissance pleasantness. I'm talking about a complete shift in orchestration where a composer could spend more time perfecting the style. Less 'heavy' instrumentation, a more casual and free harmonic language. The problem with Renaissance is it still has too much harmonic stiffness, that's why I bet on Neo and folk.
    Forgive me for raising it but, given what you say above, isn't it a little surprising that your avatar is a picture of the young Brahms?

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  3. #32
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    Almost all minimalist music.

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    Senior Member Ethereality's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Animal the Drummer View Post
    Forgive me for raising it but, given what you say above, isn't it a little surprising that your avatar is a picture of the young Brahms?
    Only half of the reason I have his avatar is because I like him. The other half is because I edited his hair. It looked too long in the original so I made it longer!

  6. #34
    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
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    Handel
    Mozart operas
    Some famous Beethoven works
    Verdi operas
    Wolf
    Some famous Bartok works
    Most of Stravinsky post-Sacre
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

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    Senior Member AbsolutelyBaching's Avatar
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    Schubert
    Messiaen (apart from the Turangalila)

  8. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbsolutelyBaching View Post
    Schubert
    Messiaen (apart from the Turangalila)
    I assume you've heard his Quartet for the End of Time?

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  10. #37
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    I've had many blind spots that are no longer blind - composers that I have come to love. Messiaen was a big one. What a great composer! And how I hated his music ...

    Now there are composers who I feel I get but who I value less highly than many. I enjoy their music but don't think it is as special as the ones I am totally in love with. I like Saint Seans and Mendelssohn but feel certain they are not as great and Mozart, Beethoven, Schumann, Schubert, Mahler .... . Others think differently. Is that a blind spot for me? Or a dim spot? Or is it merely me being discriminating?

    And then there are modern composers who I really don't have time for these days - Glass, Adams, MacMillan etc. etc. It is too early to say if this is my blind spot or merely my not participating in a passing fad. I have listened to quite a lot of their music. I think I have got to the heart of what is liked about it. But I haven't developed any interest in hearing more. I feel the return on their music is less than I need from composers I spend time with. Do I just need glasses or a torch?

  11. #38
    Senior Member AbsolutelyBaching's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janxharris View Post
    I assume you've heard his Quartet for the End of Time?
    I have his complete works as far as I can tell. I've heard all of it. I wouldn't choose to listen to anything of it again, really, apart (as I say) from Turangalila.

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  13. #39
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    Of the composers sometimes hailed by the classical music press and others around here, Pierre Boulez as a composer and Elliott Carter with Messiaen, Eric Whitacre, John Corigliano, Steve Reich, Arvo Part, John Tavener and Thomas Ades is in similar territory,
    Last edited by larold; May-29-2020 at 11:35.

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    Senior Member Simplicissimus's Avatar
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    Scriabin, most Schönberg and all Serialism, Lutosławski, Virgil Thompson, Arthur Sullivan, John Field. I know these are my blind spots because when I see them on a concert program or playlist I think, “oh no.”

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    My blind spot concerns Wagner, who is one of my favorite composers. While Siegfried Idyll would qualify as one of my favorite works, and while I also love the excerpts, I can't seem to listen to an entire Wagner opera without saying "Whew, I'm glad that's over with."

    This frustrates me because I know there are many sincere Wagnerians, and they are a devoted lot. The late Stephen Hawkings of physics/universe fame, identified Wagner as his favorite. Richard Strauss, Mahler, Bruckner, Schoenberg, and Berg, all revered Wagner. I mean, there's got to be something to a complete Wagner opera if the likes of Solti, Furtwangler, Karajan, Bernstein, and Boulez, are going to go to all the trouble of studying and conducting hours of it. As an aside I think that Hitler's alleged Wagner fixation has been overplayed, as a friend of mine, who is also a great Wagnerian, told me that Hitler was listening to Lehar and not Wagner during his final days in the bunker.

    That same friend told me that he was once at a performance of Die Miestersinger and the family sitting in front of him seemed completely mystified that after the wonderful Overture, nothing seemed to be happening. He said that he suggested that they go out, get the kids some hamburgers or something, and then come back for the final act. He said the family took his advice and later thanked him for making the evening a success.

    Maybe for some us Wagner can't be digested all at once.
    Last edited by Coach G; May-29-2020 at 13:54.

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  17. #42
    Senior Member NLAdriaan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janxharris View Post
    I share your view about Mozart (my exceptions are the 40th symphony, Sull'aria, beginning of the 1st movement of the 'Dissonance' quartet, the adagio from the 23rd Piano concerto and some parts of the Requiem).

    I would be interested if you would say what it is you dislike...but no worries if you can't quite explain.
    To me Mozart's music lacks depth. Much of it just goes by as if nothing happens. It doesn't mean all music has to be heavy and serious. I love many Haydn symphonies, I love chamber music and sonatas of many other composers. And most of Mozart's operas are not doing it for me, as Monteverdi's, Rameau's and Purcell's will.

    Most people are crazy about Mozart, he pops up in every top three. So he must absolutely be my blind spot.
    Last edited by NLAdriaan; May-29-2020 at 14:43.

  18. #43
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach G View Post
    My blind spot concerns Wagner, who is one of my favorite composers. While Siegfried Idyll would qualify as one of my favorite works, and while I also love the excerpts, I can't seem to listen to an entire Wagner opera without saying "Whew, I'm glad that's over with."

    This frustrates me because I know there are many sincere Wagnerians, and they are a devoted lot. The late Stephen Hawkings of physics/universe fame, identified Wagner as his favorite. Richard Strauss, Mahler, Bruckner, Schoenberg, and Berg, all revered Wagner. I mean, there's got to be something to a complete Wagner opera if the likes of Solti, Furtwangler, Karajan, Bernstein, and Boulez, are going to go to all the trouble of studying and conducting hours of it. As an aside I think that Hitler's alleged Wagner fixation has been overplayed, as a friend of mine, who is also a great Wagnerian, told me that Hitler was listening to Lehar and not Wagner during his final days in the bunker.

    That same friend told me that he was once at a performance of Die Miestersinger and the family sitting in front of him seemed completely mystified that after the wonderful Overture, nothing seemed to be happening. He said that he suggested that they go out, get the kids some hamburgers or something, and then come back for the final act. He said the family took his advice and later thanked him for making the evening a success.

    Maybe for some us Wagner can't be digested all at once.
    Great to find someone else who feels the same way as me! Too lazy to make a meme, but:

    Parsifal Prelude and Good Friday Music = GREATEST MUSIC EVER
    All of Parsifal - WATCHING PAINT DRY

    Act I of Gotterdammerung and the Vassal Chorus = CAN MUSIC GET ANY BETTER THAN THIS
    All of Gotterdammerung = PLEASE SOMEONE SPARE ME

    I know that there is great stuff to fill in the gaps if I devote all my time and attention to it, but I always can’t help but feel that I have better things to do than listen to a 5-hour opera when the musical selections by themselves are so sublime. Someday I know I’ll overcome this. I do want to try and listen to the complete Tristan for the first time one of these days and see if that makes things click. But for now, it is absolutely beyond my comprehension how dedicated Wagnerians can listen to the complete operas so frequently...
    Last edited by Allegro Con Brio; May-29-2020 at 14:36.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

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  19. #44
    Senior Member Flamme's Avatar
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    George Frideric Handel...
    'Listen, Mister god!
    Isn't it boring
    to dip your puffy eyes,
    every day, into a jelly of clouds?'

  20. #45
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    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    Great to find someone else who feels the same way as me! Too lazy to make a meme, but:

    Parsifal Prelude and Good Friday Music = GREATEST MUSIC EVER
    All of Parsifal - WATCHING PAINT DRY

    Act I of Gotterdammerung and the Vassal Chorus = CAN MUSIC GET ANY BETTER THAN THIS
    All of Gotterdammerung = PLEASE SOMEONE SPARE ME

    I know that there is great stuff to fill in the gaps if I devote all my time and attention to it, but I always can’t help but feel that I have better things to do than listen to a 5-hour opera when the musical selections by themselves are so sublime. Someday I know I’ll overcome this. I do want to try and listen to the complete Tristan for the first time one of these days and see if that makes things click. But for now, it is absolutely beyond my comprehension how dedicated Wagnerians can listen to the complete operas so frequently...
    In addition to the wonderful Tristan Prelude to Act I, that of Act III is also excellent.

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