Page 1 of 11 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 155

Thread: Personal blind spots

  1. #1
    Senior Member isorhythm's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2015
    Location
    NYC
    Posts
    2,640
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Personal blind spots

    What are yours?

    By "blind spot," I don't mean when you can understand why a composer's music is well-regarded, but it's just not to your taste. I mean when you just don't get it at all, and have to trust that everyone else is hearing something you don't.

    Mine is Schumann, with exactly two exceptions: the piano concerto and Dichterliebe. Today I listened to the first movement of his piano quintet and the first few Davidsbundlertanze and felt nothing.

  2. #2
    Senior Member NLAdriaan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2019
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    1,064
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Mine is Mozart. Yes, one of the big three, but not mine. Exceptions are a few late symphonies and piano concertos and the Magical flute. I just don't follow the admiration and find most of his music just not interesting.

  3. Likes norman bates liked this post
  4. #3
    Senior Member Ethereality's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2019
    Posts
    694
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Germanic Romantic in general. While I'm heavily drawn to any of the surrounding nations, there's even something about symphonic music in general that can be off-putting: it feels like it's well-thought, but just way too heavy, in harmonic stiffness and emotions, and needs much more 'instrumental subtlety' and 'harmonic casualness' closer to Folk Classical or vaguely even sounding like this https://youtu.be/CYYSZ22Svbg I say vaguely, because this example is very boring. Complexity in classical is essential, but when it comes to just orchestration, this interpretation is vaguely more complete in its Neo-Renaissance pleasantness. I'm talking about a complete shift in orchestration where a composer could spend more time perfecting the style. Less 'heavy' instrumentation, a more casual and free harmonic language. The problem with Renaissance is it still has too much harmonic stiffness, that's why I bet on Neo and folk.
    Last edited by Ethereality; May-29-2020 at 03:32.

  5. #4
    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2015
    Location
    Nova Caesarea
    Posts
    5,037
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    As I have made a god of my own tastes, I have no blind spots--just things I like and things that I've heard and just ignore thereafter. But one never knows what gem might turn up in the œuvre of any given composer. I guess the moral is Just Keep Listening.

  6. #5
    Senior Member Allerius's Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2018
    Posts
    2,255
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I have difficulty with Handel. I acknowledge him as a great composer and admire his Messiah, but can't understand how could someone place him side by side with (for me) geniuses of music such as Mozart and Bach. I much prefer Vivaldi over Handel at this moment. My personal idol and favorite composer, Beethoven, placed Handel above all other composers, and this always seemed odd to me.

    I acknowledge that much of his large oeuvre is still unknown to me at this point though, and I always keep coming back to him to challenge my current perspective.
    Last edited by Allerius; May-29-2020 at 06:10.
    “To do good whenever one can, to love liberty above all else, never to deny the truth, even though it be before the throne.” - Ludwig van Beethoven.

  7. Likes Mifek liked this post
  8. #6
    Senior Member Fabulin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    679
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Most of sacred and chamber music. Feels very samey and boring to me.
    Last edited by Fabulin; May-28-2020 at 22:41.

  9. #7
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Location
    Gilbert, AZ
    Posts
    1,749
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Schubert 9th. Mozart opera. Anything by Babbitt, Carter, Nono, Stockhausen.

  10. #8
    Assistant Administrator
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    10,771
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Perhaps my largest present blind spots are organ music, some art songs, and certain modern composers. I don't seem to enjoy the timbre of organs. Perhaps it's the background drone. I do adore some art songs, but I think in general I enjoy art songs considerably less than many others. I can't say exactly why. Modern composers are a moving target since I liked almost none of them when I first came to TC, but now like a high percentage. Ferneyhough, Nono, and Babbit have eluded me pretty much completely. Maybe the biggest difference between my tastes and the average TC taste (based on polls) is Liszt. I like Liszt but clearly not as much as the average TC member.

    One thing that I have found fascinating is how listening has greatly affected my taste. Maybe 10-15 years ago, I was surprised that Haydn was rated so highly. Now I am not surprised at all and adore much of his music. Wagner has continually risen in my estimation to being just a bit below the Big Three. In general I find that continued listening brings my view of composers more in line with the average TC view.

  11. Likes brunumb, juliante liked this post
  12. #9
    Senior Member consuono's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Posts
    480
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Tchaikovsky and Charles Ives. Mozart piano sonatas.

  13. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    New Rochelle, NY.
    Posts
    1,864
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Francis Poulenc. I can't stand the mincing preciosity and all that affected Parisian chi-chi and frou-frou . Insufferably cute .
    Frederick Delius . Just about the only English composer I dislike . Very pretty , but his music is monotonously languorous in mood and his harmonies are cloyingly sentimental . Elgar's music has real GUTS .
    Charles Gounod . His two best known operas Faust & Romeo & Juliette have a lot of nice melodies , but they're blanc, bland, bland . Utterly insipid . His Faust is a total trivialization of the mighty Faust legend . His St. Cecilia mass is just as bland and insipid . If I want a French treatment of the Faust legend, give me the Berlioz Damnation de Faust any day !

  14. Likes Varick, elgars ghost liked this post
  15. #11
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2020
    Location
    Minnesota
    Posts
    1,850
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    This thread is definitely a nice alternative to the “overrated” thread that often gets heated. Like the OP, one of mine is Schumann. I have certainly learned to appreciate his music more lately - he was a consummate master of art song and chamber music - but a lot of his solo piano stuff and all of his symphonies leave me cold. However, Scriabin is an even bigger one for me. I simply do not get why he is considered so great among a choice few. Also Tchaikovsky to a somewhat lesser degree. Mozart operas. Schubert’s "Death and the Maiden.” Electronic music. And late-Romantic, heavily chromatic, aimlessly meandering stuff like most of Szymanowski, Walton, and Reger.
    Last edited by Allegro Con Brio; May-29-2020 at 00:44.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere." - G.K. Chesterton

    "Beethoven tells you what it’s like to be Beethoven and Mozart tells you what it’s like to be human. Bach tells you what it’s like to be the universe." - Douglas Adams

  16. #12
    Senior Member norman bates's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Posts
    3,503
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by consuono View Post
    Tchaikovsky and Charles Ives. Mozart piano sonatas.
    to me some of the best things made by Ives are in his short works. For instance his In the night to me is just wonderful:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8SG448PC1Eg
    Last edited by norman bates; May-29-2020 at 01:02.
    What time is the next swan?

  17. #13
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    628
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by isorhythm View Post
    What are yours?

    By "blind spot," I don't mean when you can understand why a composer's music is well-regarded, but it's just not to your taste. I mean when you just don't get it at all, and have to trust that everyone else is hearing something you don't.
    For me it is Mahler, Bruckner and Wagner. But I don't feel that I am missing anything since I enjoy the music by other composer enough it makes up for whatever it is I am not "getting" about these other three.

    It is interesting to see the choices by other posters include some of my favorite composers, e.g. Poulenc and Schumann. But don't ask me why I like them, I just do. And sacred and chamber music are my two most favorite genres.

    So, go figure.


  18. #14
    Senior Member consuono's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2020
    Posts
    480
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Allegro Con Brio View Post
    This thread is definitely a nice alternative to the “overrated” thread that often gets heated. Like the OP, one of mine is Schumann. I have certainly learned to appreciate his music more lately - he was a consummate master of art song and chamber music - but a lot of his solo piano stuff and all of his symphonies leave me cold. However, Scriabin is an even bigger one for me. I simply do not get why he is considered so great among a choice few. ...
    Oh, yeah, +1 on that. I forgot about that one. I am certainly not among the Scriabin fan base. I just don't get it.

  19. #15
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Syracuse, NY USA
    Posts
    11,821
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by superhorn View Post
    Francis Poulenc. I can't stand the mincing preciosity and all that affected Parisian chi-chi and frou-frou . Insufferably cute .
    I dare say there's a lot more to Poulenc's music than what you imagine.
    “Music makes you feel feelings. Words make you think thoughts. But a song can make you feel a thought.”

    - Yip Harburg

  20. Likes Resurrexit, flamencosketches liked this post
Page 1 of 11 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •