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Thread: A Discussion of Living Conductors

  1. #106
    Senior Member Orfeo's Avatar
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    As mentioned before, JoAnn Falletta, deserves some nods. Her recording of Dohnanyi's Violin Concerti (Naxos) is superb and she is generally well thought of (her Gliere and Schmitt recordings were especially well received).

    Jose Serebrier likewise deserves a mention. His Glazunov cycle continues to be the best in the market and he's excellent in Ned Rorem's music (the symphonies could not have been better played and recorded).

    Martyn Brabbins. Who could forget him and his work in promoting obscure music (of Stojowski, Lyapunov, you name it). He is doing an excellent service.
    David A. Hollingsworth (dholling)

    ~All good art is about something deeper than it admits.
    Roger Ebert

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  3. #107
    Senior Member NLAdriaan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan View Post
    No... you can "recognize" something - "This is Mahler's 9th... this is Bruckner's 7th... etc... without being able to "identify" either the conductor or the orchestra...

    To simplify the premise - "If you didn't know who you were listening to you wouldn't know who you were listening to..."
    OK. Yes, it starts with knowing a piece of music. After this, you will be able to compare different interpretations to the one you already know. And then you will be able to say which one you prefer. And if it happens that a certain artist pops up as your preferred one more than once, this person might become your preferred supplier.

    ...What if three to five compositions recorded by one specific individual were presented with a selection of ten conductors who were active during the same period, the question then being "which one of these ten was the conductor of these recordings?"
    I still don't see the use of this test or even how it would work out?

  4. #108
    Senior Member Duncan's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by NLAdriaan View Post
    OK. Yes, it starts with knowing a piece of music. After this, you will be able to compare different interpretations to the one you already know. And then you will be able to say which one you prefer. And if it happens that a certain artist pops up as your preferred one more than once, this person might become your preferred supplier.



    I still don't see the use of this test or even how it would work out?
    This would be an example of a hypothetical test...

    I create a thread in Classical Music entitled - "It's time to play - Name... That... Conductor!" - (cue wild applause)...

    I choose one movement (the first or third) from one less well-known but still significant composition from a first or second tier composer...

    There are two versions of this test -

    The simple version -

    List a single audio sample of the movement from the composition chosen and provide the name of ten era-specific conductors who would be considered contemporaries of one another - for example -

    Barbirolli

    Böhm

    Furtwängler

    Jochum

    Klemperer

    Monteux

    Mravinsky

    Munch

    Reiner

    Walter

    Question - Which one of these ten conducted the audio sample that you just listened to?


    This is the difficult version -

    I list ten audio samples of one movement from one composition and provide the name of ten era-specific conductors who would be considered contemporaries of one another - each of whom has conducted one of the ten audio samples -

    Match each conductor with one of the 10 audio samples provided -

    Abbado

    Bernstein

    Giulini

    Haitink

    HvK

    Kleiber

    Kubelík

    Rattle

    Solti

    Szell


    Few, if any, would be able to answer the simple version...

    No one, not even le lièvre would be able to answer more than a third (including the two lucky guesses) of the difficult version in which one needs to match ten conductors with ten recordings.

    Which is the point of my original post -

    Quote Originally Posted by Duncan View Post

    This thread (and all those like it) is predicated on the mutual acceptance of the premise that a conductor has a characteristically unique "voice" that is both readily identifiable and exclusive to that particular conductor.

    Without recognizable identifiers being known in advance, would anyone be able to readily name a specific conductor after listening to a representative sampling of their recordings?

    My answer is -

    "If you didn't know who you were listening to you wouldn't know who you were listening to..."
    Last edited by Duncan; Jun-05-2020 at 19:45.

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