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Thread: Best "Brava" caught on record

  1. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaraslondon View Post
    This is thrilling. Callas builds up such a level of intensity that the audience just erupts at her exit after Amami, Alfredo, unable to hold back any longer.


    Callas knew so well how to build that moment. At the time, she knew how to sound with lacrime nella voce and then by stretching the sempre, sempre tra quei fior and that magnificent portamento (just at the very last second) she explodes with the Amami Alfredo. All surely painfully rehearsed with Giulini but sounding spontaneous and in the moment. And then she builds to greater heights by increasing the intensity when reaching the repeat and extended Amami to express the desperation and searing pain Violetta feels at leaving the unsuspecting Alfredo.

    Callas "ruined" this moment for me because she is alone in realizing with her singing how difficult and painful is her renunciation of love and Alfredo. She embodies what a great woman Violetta is in purely musical terms. Genius.
    Last edited by VitellioScarpia; Jun-05-2020 at 21:38.

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  3. #17
    Senior Member annaw's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Conte View Post
    It's practically de rigour there nowadays!

    (Only kidding, but there was so much audience participation in the Rheingold I saw at Bayreuth - coughing etc. I began to wonder whether it was part of the production.)

    Another audience noise during Rheingold story:
    At the first performance in Munich, the audience were so unused to Wagner's new through composed style that they gave an ovation to Loge's monologue because it was the closest thing to an aria in the opera!

    I have to say that I would consider Erda's scene pretty much an aria.

    N.
    Yes!! In Wagner's operas the arias are just called monologues .

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  5. #18
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VitellioScarpia View Post
    Callas knew so well how to build that moment. At the time, she knew how to sound with lacrime nella voce and then by stretching the sempre, sempre tra quei fior and that magnificent portamento (just at the very last second) she explodes with the Amami Alfredo. All surely painfully rehearsed with Giulini but sounding spontaneous and in the moment. And then she builds to greater heights by increasing the intensity when reaching the repeat and extended Amami to express the desperation and searing pain Violetta feels at leaving the unsuspecting Alfredo.

    Callas "ruined" this moment for me because she is alone in realizing with her singing how difficult and painful is her renunciation of love and Alfredo. She embodies what a great woman Violetta is in purely musical terms. Genius.
    The moment is caught in the photograph above. Piero Tosi, the designer, recalls,

    Slowly, with her arms outstretched, Callas, walked towrds him. As the lovers enfolded each other, overcome with passion, he sank onto the hassock, she to her knees, pouring out her heart in the invocation, "Amami, Alfredo". Callas sang not to the public but with her face to the floor, all but buried in Alfredo's embrace. Her cry was that of a desperate soul, one that wished to annul itself. Then, in tears, she ran from the garden.
    Such naturalistic acting must have been a revelation back then.

    Callas has basically "ruined" the whole opera for me. I like the Kleiber with Cotrubas, and the Serafin with De Los Angeles, but neither of them has quite the lascerating effect of Callas in the role. Whether it be at Covent Garden or Lisbon in 1958, La Scala in 1955, the Cetra recording of 1952 or even the Mexico performances of 1951 and 1952, she is so far ahead of the competition as to make questions of recorded sound negligible.

    The only singers who have managed to make me temporarily forget Maria, and then only live in the theatre, are Cotrubas (in the old Covent Garden Visconti production) and Gheorghiu (in her role debut) at Covent Garden.
    Last edited by Tsaraslondon; Jun-06-2020 at 10:33.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  7. #19
    Senior Member Tuoksu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The Conte View Post
    Ok, here is my favourite. "Son io"/"It is I", how a great artist can make a simple three note phrase mean so much.

    (You have to go to 4.00 minutes in.)



    N.
    Amazing moment!

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  9. #20
    Senior Member Tuoksu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by VitellioScarpia View Post
    Callas knew so well how to build that moment. At the time, she knew how to sound with lacrime nella voce and then by stretching the sempre, sempre tra quei fior and that magnificent portamento (just at the very last second) she explodes with the Amami Alfredo. All surely painfully rehearsed with Giulini but sounding spontaneous and in the moment. And then she builds to greater heights by increasing the intensity when reaching the repeat and extended Amami to express the desperation and searing pain Violetta feels at leaving the unsuspecting Alfredo.

    Callas "ruined" this moment for me because she is alone in realizing with her singing how difficult and painful is her renunciation of love and Alfredo. She embodies what a great woman Violetta is in purely musical terms. Genius.
    Amen to that!

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  11. #21
    Senior Member MAS's Avatar
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    In the second Act of Die Walküre in San Francisco in the early 1980s, after her confrontation with Wotan, in which Helga Dernesch had sung with such beauty and passion, that a young man standing next to me quietly cried, “yeah!” and as she slowly and regally walked upstage, the audience erupted in a spontaneous ovation. We all know, that this is very rare - to applaud in the middle of a scene, especially in a Wagner opera!


    800DDE96-4C64-4AE0-A9C5-E9411C831EA8.jpg
    Last edited by MAS; Jun-17-2020 at 17:39.

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  13. #22
    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by MAS View Post
    In the second Act of Die Walküre in San Francisco in the early 1980s, after her confrontation with Wotan, which Helga Dernesch had sung with such beauty and passion, that a young man standing next to me quietly cried, “yeah!” and as she slowly and regally walked upstage, the audience erupted in a spontaneous ovation. We all know, that this is very rare - to applaud in the middle of a scene, especially in a Wagner opera!


    800DDE96-4C64-4AE0-A9C5-E9411C831EA8.jpg
    Fabulous photo of Dernesch. In her soperano days, she was responsible for two of my most memorable evenings in the theatre. Leonore in Fidelio and the Marschallin in Der Rosenkvalier, both for Scottish Opera.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  15. #23
    Senior Member Meyerbeer Smith's Avatar
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    The guy who yells into my ear while listening to Halévy's Charles VI. Stage was several feet away, microphone / tape recorder was right next to him - so opera is pianissimo, audience reaction FFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFFF.
    Last edited by Meyerbeer Smith; Jun-17-2020 at 13:44.

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  17. #24
    Senior Member Tuoksu's Avatar
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    Here after this incredibly beautiful and flawless "si, mi chiamano Mimi", one can only expect this hysterical, well-deserved "bravaaa bravaaa biiis biiiis" reaction:


  18. #25
    Senior Member Belowpar's Avatar
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    Callas returned to La Scala in 1960 after 3.5 (?) years.


    At 23 mins in, guess who is coming on stage....



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  20. #26
    Senior Member Tuoksu's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Belowpar View Post
    Callas returned to La Scala in 1960 after 3.5 (?) years.


    At 23 mins in, guess who is coming on stage....


    Those "Mariaaa!" <3 Thank you for sharing this.

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  22. #27
    Senior Member Tuoksu's Avatar
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    There is this girl hear who screams "Brava" with all her soul, guts and lungs: https://youtu.be/l734EMm29is?t=379
    That would have been me!
    Last edited by Tuoksu; Jul-03-2020 at 00:02.

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