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Thread: Rossini Petite Messe Solennelle

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    Default Rossini Petite Messe Solennelle

    This is a splendid work and I especially love the opening Kyrie with its harmonium and piano accompaniment Rossini's work is also a look back to Renaissance polyphony, but with 19th century harmonic accompaniment. A hybrid/eclectic work: at times we have pure Rossini in the solo parts.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B27njtsX8n4
    Last edited by Christabel; Jun-22-2020 at 02:20.

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    I think I prefer this one most :


    Marielle Labèque (piano), Nicolai Gedda (tenor), Lucia Popp (soprano), David Briggs (harmonium), Dimitri Kavrakos (double bass), Katia Labèque (piano), Nicolai Gedda (mezzo-soprano), Brigitte Fassbaender (mezzo-soprano)
    Choir of King's College Cambridge/ Stephen Cleobury

    Very closely followed by :

    Katia Ricciarelli (soprano), Margarita Zimmermann (mezzo-soprano), Jose Carreras (tenor), Samuel Ramey (bass), Craig Sheppard (harmonium)

    Philharmonia Orchestra, Ambrosian Singers, Claudio Scimone

    Bargain price these days
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Thank you for those excellent tips!!

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    Senior Member philoctetes's Avatar
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    I'm a fan... discovered it through excerpts in Lucia Popp's Icon box... that one is Cleobury which I've never heard completely... I guess I should huh... I usually listen to Corboz or Spering, the latter reissued with Stabat Mater

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    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christabel View Post
    This is a splendid work and I especially love the opening Kyrie with its harmonium and piano accompaniment Rossini's work is also a look back to Renaissance polyphony, but with 19th century harmonic accompaniment. A hybrid/eclectic work: at times we have pure Rossini in the solo parts.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B27njtsX8n4
    This is the original version, Rossini scored it for twelve singers, four of them soloists, two pianos and harmonium, which I prefer.

    "Rossini later produced an orchestral version, including an additional movement, a setting of the hymn "O salutaris hostia" as a soprano aria. This version of the mass was not performed during his lifetime because he could not obtain permission to perform it with female singers in a church. It was first performed three months after his death, at the Salle Ventadour in Paris by the company of the Théâtre-Italien on 24 February 1869. " (Wikipedia)

    He referred to it as a "sin of his old age", written as it was after he had retired and ceased composing, but I think of it as a masterpiece by a great composer.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    This is the original version, Rossini scored it for twelve singers, four of them soloists, two pianos and harmonium, which I prefer.

    "Rossini later produced an orchestral version, including an additional movement, a setting of the hymn "O salutaris hostia" as a soprano aria. This version of the mass was not performed during his lifetime because he could not obtain permission to perform it with female singers in a church. It was first performed three months after his death, at the Salle Ventadour in Paris by the company of the Théâtre-Italien on 24 February 1869. " (Wikipedia)

    He referred to it as a "sin of his old age", written as it was after he had retired and ceased composing, but I think of it as a masterpiece by a great composer.
    Having heard both orchestral and keyboard versions I definitely prefer the latter. I agree with you about its stature and infinitely prefer it to those (spoiler alert) silly operas of Rossini's.

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    Junior Member Dick Johnson's Avatar
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    Default Rossini Religious Works

    I love the Petite Messe Solonelle but prefer the later version for orchestra. The original has charm but the simple setting has always sounded odd to me for a religious work. Admittedly, the orchestrated version seems like a larger work - leading to the joke that it is neither "petite" or "solonelle". I listen to the Antonio Pappano recording the most.

    As a huge fan of both Bel Canto opera and religious music, the Stabat Mater by Rossini is simply divine. It has been criticized for being "too operatic" but it was written by Rossini as a true religious work with some glorious music (that just happens to be operatic). I've never understood the criticism that Rossini is too bel canto - that was his idiom and he applied it well to religious music.

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    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    It's a work I love (the original version) and dislike (the orchestral version). There are now many versions to consider and two recent versions that do not call on big name soloists are:

    kaljuste.jpg

    immerseel.jpg

    I enjoy both but do feel that a little more sense of fun would have been good.

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    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    Listening for the first time now. Lovely! It’s uncomplicated but beautiful. Exactly the kind of choral work that I would love to see performed in a large cathedral.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere." - G.K. Chesterton

    "Beethoven tells you what it’s like to be Beethoven and Mozart tells you what it’s like to be human. Bach tells you what it’s like to be the universe." - Douglas Adams

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    I can thoroughly recommend Marcus Creed and the RIAS Kammerchor on Harmonia Mundi... or perhaps that should be "Harmonium" Mundi in this case

    Petite Messe - Marcus Creed.jpg

    NB: I bought this as a download from a couple of sources, but had them refunded due to some "peakiness" in louder passages. I bought the CD in the end, and it's wonderful; nicely packaged, too.

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    Senior Member Azol's Avatar
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    A very fine performance available on DVD.

    Riccardo Chailly conductor

    Alexandrina Pendatchanska soprano
    Manuela Custer mezzo-soprano
    Stefano Secco tenor
    Mirco Palazzi bass

    Gewandhaus Chor
    Gewandhaus Orchester Leipzig
    Chor der Oper Leipzig

    Recorded at Gewandhaus of Leipzig, Leipzig, Germany in 2010

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