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Thread: Automatic music : is it possible ?

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    Default Automatic music : is it possible ?

    Greetings, everyone,
    I have been studying music and the mathematical relationships between chords and musical scales for some years now.
    I have conceived a mathematical theory that studies the links between the world of harmony and that of melody.

    I wanted to share with you a website where I put some results of my research:

    http://www.music-engine.net/

    I also created a youtube channel where you can find some videos:

    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCUh..._yypwBQ/videos

    Two aspects can be seen: that of musical transformations, and that of automatic musical generation.

    I would like to know what you think about these results. In some time I would like to put online the software that generates this music.

    A cordial greeting to all
    Emanuele
    Last edited by music engine; Jun-24-2020 at 15:19.

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    Senior Member Bwv 1080's Avatar
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    Senior Member JAS's Avatar
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    There was a book and dice game in Mozart's day which produces musical lines based on samples and the throw of the die. Not surprisingly, they begin to sound very much alike, but it is an interesting game.

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    Remember Ljaren Hillier's Illiac Suite?

    Of the music; it needs something...I'm not sure what. More personality.
    Last edited by millionrainbows; Jun-24-2020 at 18:29.

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    London Symphony Orchestra Plays Computer-Written Composition
    Dec 06, 2017

    A piece of classical music written by a computer will be performed by the London Symphony Orchestra, reports The Guardian. The modernist-sounding composition, “Transits – Into an Abyss” was written by a cluster of computers at the University of Malaga in Spain, and seems to be the first ever computer piece to be performed by elite musicians.

    A sampling of the performance will be livestreamed tonight on the University of Malaga’s web site, in honor of what would have been the 100th birthday of the revolutionary computer scientist Alan Turing. The full performance will be included in a debut CD of the computer’s compositions, to be released in September.

    Called Iamus, the cluster is named for the son of the Greek god Apollo, who was said to understand the language of birds. Iamus’ mastery of human-song isn’t quite at mythic proportions yet, but it seems to be getting more fluent by the year (it started making music in 2010): while critic Tom Service panned last year’s “Hello, World!,” an Iamus composition, for a quality of “greyness,” members of the LSO are using similar language this time around to praise the computer’s work.

    “I felt it was like a wall of sound,” LSO chairman Lennox Mackenzie told The Guardian. “If you put a colour to it, this music was grey. It went nowhere. It was too dense and massive, no instrument stuck out at any point. But at the end of it, I thought it was quite epic.”

    Computer compositions are by no means a new thing, but Iamus is unusual for actually getting an audience (see the case of the deft but ignored computer composer Emmy). Iamus also works solo. The only human directive given is how long the piece should be and which instruments should be included. In “Transits,” the style Iamus arrived at by way of its biology-inspired creation process is a close simulacra to modernist music, with dissonant notes layered on top of each other. The score does divert from protocol in one striking way — it’s apparently “festooned” with exclamation marks.


    And then there's THIS:

    AIVA - "Genesis" Symphonic Fantasy in A minor, Op. 21
    AIVA is an Artificial Intelligence who composes music for movies, commercials, games and trailers.



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    Senior Member DaddyGeorge's Avatar
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    Almost anything can be analyzed and imitated. Robotic hands can play the piano, computers can paint pictures, compose music, simulate NBA games and much more (maybe one day they will write books or make movies), the results often withstand strict evaluation criteria and people don't recognize it's artificial. I find it impressive, fascinating, admirable. Only I do not intend to devote time to any of this...

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAS View Post
    There was a book and dice game in Mozart's day which produces musical lines based on samples and the throw of the die. Not surprisingly, they begin to sound very much alike, but it is an interesting game.
    Mozart’s Musikalisches Würfelspiel is available on several Internet pages. Mozart’s game allows you to automatically generate waltzes – 11^16 = 45,949,729,863,572,161 of them!

    Other even earlier examples are discussed on this Wiki page.


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    There's something that programs can't do, and that is: create art. Art has to convey human experience to us, in meaningful ways that we have invented for doing this.

    That's why I keep saying you shouldn't try to objectify art; otherwise, you're opening yourself up to these kinds of computer-generated simulations of art. Art must be human.

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    Any matter of musical consciousness needs to be touchable . Random is ok , touch these hands in wild
    play at the piano .

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    As early as the 1950s, Pierre Boulez and John Cage were trying to make compositions which "created themselves," i.e. compositions which generated their own material. It doesn't take a computer to do this. See Boulez' "Structures."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Structures_(Boulez)

    Speaking of Structures, Book I in 2011 Boulez described it as a piece in which "the responsibility of the composer is practically absent. Had computers existed at that time I would have put the data through them and made the piece that way. But I did it by hand...It was a demonstration through the absurd." Asked whether it should still be listened to as music, Boulez replied: "I am not terribly eager to listen to it. But for me it was an experiment that was absolutely necessary."
    Last edited by millionrainbows; Jul-06-2020 at 15:18.

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    My Commodore 64 included instructions for making a design for random-generated music . It inspired . I
    have learned to be random more perfectly , and it's funny .

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    Computers have been able to make music for quite some time. Although they can not by themselves yet create anything worth listening to, they have come to play a very important, and increasingly indispensable, role for the creation of music by human composers. Because computer technology (both the software and the hardware, on which the software depends) is continuing to advance at an astonishing pace, it is likely that this role will continue to increase and the need for human effort will further decrease. Thus, it would not be surprising if in a few decades computers would be able to autonomously compose music that the public would willingly pay big bucks to hear at a concert. Music composition could become just one more of the many things that computers can do that in the past would have seemed to be in the realm of science fiction.

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    The A.I. composer submit to God's Will . The audience will have been prepared to receive this truth of music by the Global A.I. Mental Health Bot .

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    Quote Originally Posted by neofite View Post
    Computers have been able to make music for quite some time. Although they can not by themselves yet create anything worth listening to, they have come to play a very important, and increasingly indispensable, role for the creation of music by human composers. Because computer technology (both the software and the hardware, on which the software depends) is continuing to advance at an astonishing pace, it is likely that this role will continue to increase and the need for human effort will further decrease. Thus, it would not be surprising if in a few decades computers would be able to autonomously compose music that the public would willingly pay big bucks to hear at a concert. Music composition could become just one more of the many things that computers can do that in the past would have seemed to be in the realm of science fiction.
    If computers are used much into the future, I think they will play a "collaborative" role, like the way Brian Ferneyhough uses them. He uses a certain IRCAM program which generates algorithmic possibilities from the material he gives it, which would normally take hours to generate manually, and then "cherry-picks" the material he wants from those possibilities. This saves him the drudgery and time it would take him to manually calculate such things. Isn't that what computers are best at? Being fast & efficient, and doing all the "grunt work?"

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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    There's something that programs can't do, and that is: create art. Art has to convey human experience to us, in meaningful ways that we have invented for doing this.

    That's why I keep saying you shouldn't try to objectify art; otherwise, you're opening yourself up to these kinds of computer-generated simulations of art. Art must be human.
    Spot on! The music I play comes from the heart and soul, neither of which any computer has been able to generate. The spontaneity of a human performance will never be replaced by automation, imho.

    In my line of work as a church musician there are certain instantaneous pauses in a service that cannot be known about in advance, in other words, it would be impossible for a 'machine' to react to those instances when a short improvised interval of music is needed.

    Kh
    Kh
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