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Thread: Lifecycles

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    Default Lifecycles

    If anyone can tell me what's going on in this composition of mine from a music theory point of view I'd be interested to hear not being very up on theory. There are a lot of key changes for sure!

    https://owendavidmusic.org/2020/07/03/lifecycles/
    Last edited by Owen David; Jul-05-2020 at 00:15.

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    It sounds to me like a conventionally tonal piece in a minor key. I don't hear it changing keys decisively.

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    Quote Originally Posted by millionrainbows View Post
    It sounds to me like a conventionally tonal piece in a minor key. I don't hear it changing keys decisively.
    Would that be F#minor throughout then?

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    Senior Member Vasks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owen David View Post
    Would that be F#minor throughout then?
    No, each one of the key signature changes at each double bar are other keys besides the ones in F# minor (3 sharps). In other words, there are times that C# minor (4 sharps) happens and B minor (2 sharps) occurs. These keys are closely related to your home key of F#minor so they're not extreme and will not jump out strongly as different than F# minor.

    Now about your sound file. I can't speak to the instrumentation of Lifecycles (because you didn't say) but in your String Quartet post the sound file is of a string orchestra not a quartet. Then I noticed you hired a guy to create sound files and when I went to his site I see that he can produce "solo string" sounds. So why did he/you allow string orchestra instead of solo violins, solo viola and solo cello for your quartets?
    "Music in any generation is not what the public thinks of it but what the musicians make of it"....Virgil Thomson

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    Yes, that's how it feels to me, as regards the key shifts. But as you say they're not extreme leaps from the home key so have quite a unified feel. The end passage sounds like A major to me, again a related key.

    I'll tell him what Vasks asks! I had thought it sound a rather "rich" sound for a String Quartet but thought he'd just beefed up the sound somehow, maybe with some sort of reverb, because I certainly did want it to be a forceful sound.

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    Senior Member EdwardBast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owen David View Post
    Would that be F#minor throughout then?
    Both Millions and Vasks are right about the key, in different senses. The closely related keys Vasks mentions are heard, along with A major. But Millions is correct in calling it a conventional tonal piece in a minor key. From the middle Baroque on, conventional tonal works (Bach's fugues, for example), tended to visit a series of closely keys, like the ones you have used, before returning home at the end.
    Last edited by EdwardBast; Jul-06-2020 at 04:22.

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    Quote Originally Posted by EdwardBast View Post
    Both Millions and Vasks are right about the key, in different senses. The closely related keys Vasks mentions are heard, along with A major. But Millions is correct in calling it a conventional tonal piece in a minor key. From the middle Baroque on, conventional tonal works (Bach's fugues, for example), tended to visit a series of closely keys, like the ones you have used, before returning home at the end.
    Thanks - I can now say I have been compared to Bach, and not tell a lie.

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    Senior Member Vasks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Owen David View Post
    Thanks - I can now say I have been compared to Bach, and not tell a lie.
    Ah! But Bach didn't show new key signatures. He merely used accidentals to be in a new key. The tonic key signature never changes.
    Last edited by Vasks; Jul-06-2020 at 20:45.
    "Music in any generation is not what the public thinks of it but what the musicians make of it"....Virgil Thomson

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vasks View Post
    Now about your sound file. I can't speak to the instrumentation of Lifecycles (because you didn't say) but in your String Quartet post the sound file is of a string orchestra not a quartet. Then I noticed you hired a guy to create sound files and when I went to his site I see that he can produce "solo string" sounds. So why did he/you allow string orchestra instead of solo violins, solo viola and solo cello for your quartets?
    Thanks for raising the issue. I had a listen to the alternative audio with individual string sounds. Not sure it will always produce a better effect, but certainly on this occasion it has, I think. So I've changed the version on my website to that with the individual string sounds:

    https://owendavidmusic.org/2020/07/03/lifecycles/

    Thanks!

    (The instrumentation is standard String Quartet - cello, viola and two violins. )

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    Quote Originally Posted by Vasks View Post
    Ah! But Bach didn't show new key signatures. He merely used accidentals to be in a new key. The tonic key signature never changes.
    Did Baroque music have "keys?"
    Last edited by millionrainbows; Jul-09-2020 at 17:19.

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