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Thread: The Beatles appraised

  1. #76
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chilham View Post
    Fixed that up for ya.
    Quote Originally Posted by Sunburst Finish View Post
    Fixed that up for ya.
    Oh.

    Thanks, guys.

    Actually, it sort of makes a difference as to her perspective on music, although since the Beatles are now considered a band from ANCIENT times, I suppose it really isn't all THAT much of a factor.

    I still tend to view them in the context of WHEN they did what they did, and their debut, and their albums, were quite different in the UK than in the US. I'd not really thought much about how their music was trotted out down under.

    So, was it her accent that tipped you off? Or did you check out her "ABOUT" details?

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  3. #77
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    The nice young AUSTRALIAN lady Caroline assesses the Beatles' second album, With the Beatles, and pays a little more attention to the fact that it is actually almost half covers, as the first album was.

    She seems to focus on the bass and drums, and tends to talk over or ignore guitar solos and guitar hooks. Granted, Harrison's solos were somewhat primitive back then, but still creative and clever - except for the solo on 'Til There Was You, and several other tunes, which are quite sophisticated. Just as Ringo played "what was needed", so it was with George; always with the best stuff, tastefully delivered.

    I was surprised at the comment about the backing vocals being too equal . . . it's her contention that backing vocals ought to be "background" vocals. I love the sound of blended vocals myself, but both she and I are products of our generations and backgrounds. Just . . . I just found that interesting.

    Last edited by pianozach; Jul-27-2021 at 16:38.

  4. #78
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Four I listened to recently:

    Two of Us
    Across the Universe
    Strawberry Fields Forever
    Don't Let Me Down
    FOUR RANDOM BEATLES SONGS OF THE DAY

    Across the Universe, World Wildlife version
    Strawberry Fields Forever, Love version
    Two of Us
    Don't Let Me Down, rooftop version




    Last edited by pianozach; Jul-27-2021 at 16:41.

  5. #79
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post
    THAT album is just a repackaged version of "Introducing the Beatles" from Vee-Jay Records. They managed to squander the rights to the album, and mismanaged most of their releases of those early songs. They ended up folding in 1964, leaving behind $3 million in debt.

    By 1961, Vee-Jay was one of America's top labels, with a strong jazz catalog, some top gospel groups, and Jerry Butler, Jimmy Reed, John Lee Hooker and Betty Everett cranking out hit after hit. AND a slew of other hits and a rich legacy of black American music. The first hint of disaster came in 1962, with their biggest record to date.

    The Four Seasons hit "Sherry" was so big that Vee-Jay's owners found themselves without the money to pay for pressing more copies of the records, although the label stumbled along for a while. The worst thing it could have done would be to sign another hit group, but it did. And what a group: Capitol Records already had passed on the option to release The Beatles in America, but the Brackens jumped at the chance. "Please Please Me" and "From Me to You" both came out on Vee-Jay, followed by an album at the end of 1963. The Four Seasons and the Beatles both went to greener pastures, and Vee-Jay wound up in court, its day in the sun over.

    It sold 2.6 million Beatles records in one month, but Vee-Jay could not keep the records pressed and on the shelves or pay the artist royalties.
    A double album. I wonder what the price was.
    Albert Einstein, "I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.

  6. #80
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post
    THAT album is just a repackaged version of "Introducing the Beatles" from Vee-Jay Records. They managed to squander the rights to the album, and mismanaged most of their releases of those early songs. They ended up folding in 1964, leaving behind $3 million in debt.

    By 1961, Vee-Jay was one of America's top labels, with a strong jazz catalog, some top gospel groups, and Jerry Butler, Jimmy Reed, John Lee Hooker and Betty Everett cranking out hit after hit. AND a slew of other hits and a rich legacy of black American music. The first hint of disaster came in 1962, with their biggest record to date.

    The Four Seasons hit "Sherry" was so big that Vee-Jay's owners found themselves without the money to pay for pressing more copies of the records, although the label stumbled along for a while. The worst thing it could have done would be to sign another hit group, but it did. And what a group: Capitol Records already had passed on the option to release The Beatles in America, but the Brackens jumped at the chance. "Please Please Me" and "From Me to You" both came out on Vee-Jay, followed by an album at the end of 1963. The Four Seasons and the Beatles both went to greener pastures, and Vee-Jay wound up in court, its day in the sun over.

    It sold 2.6 million Beatles records in one month, but Vee-Jay could not keep the records pressed and on the shelves or pay the artist royalties.
    A double album. I wonder what the price was.


    added:
    VeeJay Records story

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lo0PehOQAJ4
    Albert Einstein, "I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.

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  8. #81
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Caroline's back.

    Beatles' 3rd album, A Hard Day's Night



    .

    And the singles 1962-1964


  9. #82
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Four I listened to recently:

    Two of Us
    Across the Universe
    Strawberry Fields Forever
    Don't Let Me Down
    I'd just posted alternate versions of these (except for Two of Us)

    Across the Universe, World Wildlife version: This is the one with the birds, and the girls
    Strawberry Fields Forever, Love version: This one cobbles together several different takes, instead of two.
    Two of Us
    Don't Let Me Down, rooftop version: this one has 3-part harmonies on the choruses


    Here's the same four, but now the regular versions, except for Two of Us:

    Two of Us (rock version)
    Across the Universe
    Strawberry Fields Forever
    Don't Let Me Down






  10. #83
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    The Danny Boyle film, Yesterday, provides the perfect appraisal of the Beatles legacy. Watch it if you don't get it or have started to hear them as stale.

  11. #84
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    I love I've Got a Feeling from the Let it Be sessions. Sounds to me like a precursor for the Who's mid-paced 'power rock' style which was to soon follow with songs like The Seeker, Water and Naked Eye.
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

  12. #85
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    To me The Beatles combined the best of Pop catchy-ness with true melodic mastery. Even their arguably "throw-away" songs like "Two of Us" contain elements which are truly inspired and wonderful. Which is why they confound the Pop template of rise and fall to obscurity.

    That band, and I vastly prefer their work as a band to any of their solo work, was a singularity, a Big Bang, if you will.
    Last edited by SanAntone; Aug-29-2021 at 15:59.

  13. #86
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    ^ Yes, none of them did anything that came close to what they did together. I've often wondered why. Was it the influence or assistance of George Martin?

  14. #87
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    ^ Yes, none of them did anything that came close to what they did together. I've often wondered why. Was it the influence or assistance of George Martin?
    I believe it was the chemistry and combination of that group of musicians and George Martin's musical and production expertise. Every once in a great while the stars are all aligned to produce a magnificent effect. And it seemed to happen a number of times in those heady days of the 1960s and early 70s. Colin Harper's excellent book, Bathed In Lightning: John McLaughlin, the 60s and the Emerald Beyond contains a detailed history of the early to mid 60s British music scene and the working relationships of all of the young musicians who eventually found the right chemistry and went on to create all of the famous bands we all know from that period.
    "In the beginning there was noise. And the noise begat rhythm. And the rhythm begat everything else." - Mickey Hart

  15. #88
    Senior Member Forster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    For me they will always endure - although later noted for ambitious arrangements and stretching the latest studio technology to its limit they could still do the simpler things well when they had to. I have relatively little interest in their early zesty pop period, though - for me the Help! album from the summer of 1965 is the point where things start to get really interesting.

    And in case the 'Would you reduce the White Album to a single album?' question comes up, my answer is not exactly - such was its long running time you could trim the White Album by twenty minutes and still be left with a double set weighing in at over 70 minutes.
    For me too. I grew up in a Beatlemania household, so lived with them and their music from a very young age. Their break up coincided with the aftermath of my parents' divorce, so they provided the soundtrack to both my childhood and my disillusionment. For quite a while afterwards, I couldn't listen to their music, especially the White album.

    Speaking of which, the concept of what an album is/could be/should be varies. For some, it should be a collection of solid, quality songs - no filler. Once the notion of 'concept album' had emerged, it became acceptable (not just to me, I'm sure) to see an album as a container for a collection of pieces of music - some songs, some outtakes, some vocal comment, some instrumental moments, some experimentation - that represent the artists' musical thinking and exploration at a particualr moment in time. So, The Beatles is just such a mix, and I wouldn't change one second of it. It represents them - The Beatles - so the title and content are entirely appropriate.

    I regretted their passing back then, and I still regret that, unlike some other bands that endured, they were never able to resolve their differences. I am always happy in their company, whether it's Please Please Me or Abbey Road.
    Last edited by Forster; Aug-29-2021 at 17:43.

  16. #89
    Senior Member eljr's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Art Rock View Post
    When I started listening to pop/rock in the 70s, they were already history. I bought the red and blue double albums, and enjoyed many of their songs. Still do. But for me they were a 'songs band' rather than an 'album band' - even albums like Sgt Pepper and Abbey Road I like for a number of the songs, rather than wanting to listen to the albums.

    My favourite songs include:

    A day in the life
    Blackbird
    Eleanor Rigby
    Lucy in the sky with diamonds
    Penny Lane
    She's leaving home
    Strawberry fields
    The ballad of John and Yoko
    Yesterday

    They all hit a solid 5/6 on the Artrockometer. And there are dozens others I like to listen to.

    Fair warning: if you ever encounter me in a karaoke bar, one of the songs I always select is Back in the USSR.
    I'd have to go with
    Dear Prudence
    Hey Bulldog
    She Said She Said
    Good Morning Good Morning
    Help
    Get Back
    Yer Blues
    Glass Onion
    Helter Skelter
    Come Together
    Those who can make you believe absurdities can make you commit atrocities.
    Voltaire

  17. #90
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Today's Four Random Songs From the Beatles

    Lucy In the Sky with Diamonds (1967)
    Julia (1968)
    ‘Till There Was You (1963)
    Help! (1965)


    Three from John and a cover of a Broadway tune from Paul.

    Lucy In the Sky with Diamonds (1967)
    . . . A continuance of John's lyrical exploration of psychedelia
    Julia (1968)
    . . . Lyrically John was fearless. A song about his dead mother, killed by a drunk off-duty policeman when John was 17.
    ‘Till There Was You (1963)
    . . . A surprisingly sophisticated guitar solo from the 20-year-old George Harrison.
    Help! (1965)
    . . . an earlier song from John baring his feelings, and surreptitiously allowing us to see his pain.





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