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Thread: The Beatles appraised

  1. #106
    Senior Member Ethereality's Avatar
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    My Top 8 which I consider very superior to the majority of their songs.

    1. Michelle
    2. In My Life
    3. Here Comes The Sun
    4. Blackbird
    5. Something
    6. Across The Universe
    7. All You Need Is Love
    8. My Sweet Lord

    Things like A Day In The Life and I Want You are cool, but they're voodoo tricks. If I want real voodoo I listen to Hendrix and his various castles of sand. Whereas Yesterday, I find the most overrated Beatles composition.
    Last edited by Ethereality; Sep-08-2021 at 08:46.

  2. #107
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    Ten songs in no particular order... I like them all. I like more Beatles songs than this, but it's fine to choose 10.

    1) In my Life
    2) Norwegian Wood
    3) She's Leaving Home
    4) When I'm 64
    5) Strawberry Fields Forever
    6) Something
    7) Girl
    8) Michelle
    9) Help!
    10) Yesterday

  3. #108
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Okay, I'll play.

    A Baker's Dozen of songs (today's choices):

    1. Strawberry Fields Forever
    2. Eleanor Rigby
    3. I Am the Walrus
    4. She's Leaving Home
    5. Across the Universe
    6. Taxman
    7. Lucy in the Sky with Diamonds
    8. Fixing a Hole
    9. In My Life
    10. Day Tripper
    11. Dear Prudence
    12. Sexy Sadie
    13. All You Need Is Love
    Last edited by SanAntone; Sep-08-2021 at 17:13.

  4. #109
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    Eleonor Rigby used to be among my top favorites, but I got slightly tired of it.
    She's Leaving Home took its place for now.

    Still I think Eleanor Rigby is a great song.

  5. #110
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    The Four Random Beatles Songs Of the Day

    She's Leaving Home
    The Ballad of John and Yoko
    Yesterday
    Back In the USSR


    Coincidentally all four songs are lacking one or more Beatles.

    She's Leaving Home (1967) features Paul McCartney on Lead Vocal, with John Lennon singing a counterpoint vocal in the choruses. None of the Beatles play on the track, which consists of 4 violins, 2 violas, 3 cellos, doublebass, and harp.
    The Ballad of John and Yoko (1969). Lennon was insistent that the song be recorded immediately, even though George Harrison was on vacation, and Ringo Starr was filming a movie with Peter Sellers. McCartney played piano, drums, and bass, while Lennon played acoustic and electric guitars.
    Yesterday (1965) was rehearsed as an uptempo pop song with bass, drums, and guitars, but on Producer George Martin's suggestion it was recorded with only McCartney on acoustic guitar, with a string quartet overdub recorded three days later.
    Back In the USSR (1968). Starr had temporarily quit the band during the rehearsals of this very song, so the other three created a composite drum and percussion track, which seems to have been an attempt at a hybrid Jerry Lee Lewis / Beach Boys sound.






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  7. #111
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    ^^^^^^^^
    Good info.
    I'd like to have this level of reliable information about the creative conclusions of JsB, LvB and Schubert.
    Albert Einstein, "I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.

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  9. #112
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Four Random Beatles Songs For A Sunday Evening

    Here, There and Everywhere (1966)
    A Hard Day’s Night (1964)
    Love Me Do (1962)
    Honey Pie (1968)

    Here, There and Everywhere: This song, which takes a cue from the American Standards genre, was a favorite Beatles song of Paul McCartney, John Lennon, and producer George Martin. It was ranked the 4th greatest song of all time by Mojo in 2000.

    A Hard Day’s Night: Written to order when the film's director, Dick Lester, suggested based on something he'd heard Ringo Starr say. Paul & John had it written that same night. George Harrison's 12-string Rickenbacker guitar solo was doubled on piano by Martin but tracked at half speed and sped up during mixing.

    That's John singing lead on the verses, joined by Paul for the two sets of descending chromatic parallel thirds, and Paul singing lead on the bridges.

    A curious facet of A Hard Day's Night is the opening chord, the composition of which is still argued over today: It's mostly a G7sus4/A created by producer Martin playing piano chord (with an D on the bottom) atop George Harrison's Fadd9 (or "F with a G on top," as he said in 2001) played on his 12-string Rickenbacker, Lennon's Fadd9 played on his Gibson J-160E and McCartney's bass single note (D) played on his Hofner 500/1, BUT that chiming chord is certainly iced by the cluster F-G-A created by the high octave 3rd and 4th strings on Harrison's 12-string guitar, as well as a cymbal and snare drum buried in the mix and creating overtones of their own. Computer analysis has suggested that Martin played five notes: D2, G2, D3, G3 and C4 with the sustain pedal held down, allowing further harmonics to emerge. Commit this to memory and astound your friends and enemies.

    Oh, and the song does this oddball thing of seamlessly alternating between G Major and G Aolian.

    Love Me Do: Sometimes credited for "The Day the World Changed Forever". It was raw, it was sexy, and an almost complete antithesis of the saccharine, over-produced bubble-gummy pop prevalent at the time. Love Me Do was mostly written by a 16-year-old Paul McCartney around 1958-1959, with bandmate John Lennon coming up with the middle 8 sometime later. But a great deal of credit goes to producer George Martin for fleshing out the arrangement, and drummer Starr for his unusual drum pattern, which was used by session drummer Andy White for his version on the album version of the song, with Ringo relegated to playing tambourine. This was their first single, and their first Top 20 Hit in the UK. The version with Ringo on drums DID appear on the first pressings of the single, but was soon replaced; it also appeared on the PAST MASTERS collection released in 1988.

    Honey Pie: Only six years later Paul McCartney wrote this curious throwback to the British music hall style (or American Vaudeville) of the 1920s. Another oddity on this track is that it's Lennon playing the Django Reinhardt-inflected lead guitar solo, and George Harrison plays a 6-string bass. McCartney sings the lead, plays piano, and collaborated with producer Martin on the arrangement that features 5 saxophones and 2 clarinets. He claims his vocal was inspired by Fred Astaire, on songs such as Cheek to Cheek.





  10. #113
    Senior Member SixFootScowl's Avatar
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    My favorite Beatles song is Come Together. That song could have been written by Bob Dylan.

    I have never been big on The Beatles, though I had a couple LPs, tapes or CDs at times.
    “The media’s the most powerful entity on Earth. They have the power to make the innocent look guilty and to make the guilty innocent, and that’s power. Because they control the mind of the masses.”
    --Malcolm X

  11. #114
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Four Random Beatles Songs For a Monday Evening

    Martha My Dear
    I'm So Tired
    Blackbird
    Piggies


    Well, perhaps these four aren't all that random. They are the first four songs, in order, from Side Two of their 1968 double-LP "White Album". They're an eclectic bunch:

    Martha My Dear is another of Paul McCartney's bottomless Music Hall type songs, and it's about his old English sheepdog, Martha. Paul handles the vocals, piano, bass, electric guitar, drums, and handclaps, and he collaborated with producer George Martin on the overdubbed arrangement of a 9-pc. string section and a six-pc. brass section.

    I'm So Tired is from John Lennon. It's a fairly straightforward tune about insomnia, but at the very end of the song, there is what seems to be nonsensical mumbling in the background, which, if played backwards sounds suspiciously like "Turn me on dead man, miss him, miss him, miss him." Just another small quirky thing in a Beatles song.

    Blackbird is just Paul accompanying himself on acoustic guitar and tapping his foot (and tape loops of some blackbird calls). Since this was already featured in one of the random four Beatles songs, here's a live version performed 36 years later. Paul has played this particular song on every concert tour.

    Piggies is one of George Harrison's contributions to the album, a bizarre bit of baroque pop Orwellian social commentary





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  13. #115
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by pianozach View Post
    Four Random Beatles Songs For a Monday Evening

    Martha My Dear
    I'm So Tired
    Blackbird
    Piggies


    Well, perhaps these four aren't all that random. They are the first four songs, in order, from Side Two of their 1968 double-LP "White Album". They're an eclectic bunch:

    Martha My Dear is another of Paul McCartney's bottomless Music Hall type songs, and it's about his old English sheepdog, Martha. Paul handles the vocals, piano, bass, electric guitar, drums, and handclaps, and he collaborated with producer George Martin on the overdubbed arrangement of a 9-pc. string section and a six-pc. brass section.

    I'm So Tired is from John Lennon. It's a fairly straightforward tune about insomnia, but at the very end of the song, there is what seems to be nonsensical mumbling in the background, which, if played backwards sounds suspiciously like "Turn me on dead man, miss him, miss him, miss him." Just another small quirky thing in a Beatles song.

    Blackbird is just Paul accompanying himself on acoustic guitar and tapping his foot (and tape loops of some blackbird calls). Since this was already featured in one of the random four Beatles songs, here's a live version performed 36 years later. Paul has played this particular song on every concert tour.

    Piggies is one of George Harrison's contributions to the album, a bizarre bit of baroque pop Orwellian social commentary
    You know, I forgot just how good the White Album is. My favorite of these four is "I'm So Tired", but remember learning how to play "Martha My Dear" on the piano. It's a clever tune. "Blackbird" of course is a classic, that's another one I spent hours getting the guitar part right. I always thought the tapping was a metronome.

  14. #116
    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    You know, I forgot just how good the White Album is. My favorite of these four is "I'm So Tired", but remember learning how to play "Martha My Dear" on the piano. It's a clever tune. "Blackbird" of course is a classic, that's another one I spent hours getting the guitar part right. I always thought the tapping was a metronome.
    There's video of him rehearsing it. He's got some fancy shoes to tap with.

    Check 'em out. Close up 20 seconds into this clip.

    Last edited by pianozach; Sep-14-2021 at 17:29.

  15. #117
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    I've wondered how a young person picks up a guitar and begins strumming it left-handedly. Has he ever talked about it?

    Did a family member realize he was left-handed and showed him a few things? I assume he must have been working mostly on his own (self taught). Such a lucky result, learning the easy chords and then the 'difficult' ones. Accordingly, he was self-propelled (as was John and George).

    Kids were so much less distracted back then. Who has the 'alone' time today...
    Last edited by Luchesi; Sep-14-2021 at 22:35.
    Albert Einstein, "I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.

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  17. #118
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    I enjoy comedian Peter Sellers' spoofs of their songs, as did the four Beatles, who loved The Goons (a radio program), and Seller's early B & W films (as do I). George Martin actually produced two of Seller's early comedy LP records in the late 1950s, so there was that connection, too.

    Here's The Beatles song, "A Hard Day's Night", recited by Peter Sellers, spoofing Sir Laurence Oliver's Richard III,



    & here are the outtakes & bloopers,



    Sellers' 4 takes on The Beatles "She Loves You" using four different accents, as Dr. Strangelove, a Cockney, an Upper Crust Englishman, & an Irishman is also funny (warning: there's a bit of foul language at the end of the last take):



    As for The Beatles albums, I've long been partial to Rubber Soul, Revolver, & Abbey Road myself. & George will always be my favorite Beatle. At least, he's the Beatle that I think I would have found most interesting to have had dinner with (though I find Ringo the funniest of the four), based on Martin Scorsese's 2011 documentary on Harrison, "Living in the Material World", which I found fascinating; as well as Harrison's post-Beatles songs & lyrics: such as "My Sweet Lord", "All Things Must Pass", and "Awaiting On You All", which never fails to warm my heart and give me a laugh (i.e., the bit about the pope & General Motors):

    "You don't need no love in
    You don't need no bed pan
    You don't need a horoscope or a microscope
    The see the mess that you're in
    If you open up your heart
    You will know what I mean
    We've been polluted so long
    Now here's a way for you to get clean
    By chanting the names of the Lord and you'll be free
    The Lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see
    Chanting the names of the Lord and you'll be free
    The Lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see

    You don't need no passport
    And you don't need no visas
    You don't need to designate or to emigrate
    Before you can see Jesus
    If you open up your heart
    You'll see he's right there
    Always was and will be
    He'll relieve you of your cares

    By chanting the names of the Lord and you'll be free
    The Lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see
    Chanting the names of the Lord and you'll be free
    The Lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see

    You don't need no church house
    And you don't need no Temple
    You don't need no rosary beads or them books to read
    To see that you have fallen
    If you open up your heart
    You will know what I mean
    We've been kept down so long
    Someone's thinking that we're all green

    And while the Pope owns fifty one percent of General Motors
    And the stock exchange is the only thing he's qualified to quote us
    The Lord is awaiting on you all to awaken and see
    By chanting the names of the Lord and you'll be free."

    Yeah, George is definitely my favorite Beatle. For me, the most interesting part of Scorsese's film documentary is when Harrison's wife, Olivia, talks openly about what happened in the room when George passed. She said the room suddenly became filled with an unnatural light. & she added that George had spend many years preparing for this moment via prayer and chanting.

    P.S. In recent years, I've also gotten to know and like Harrison's "early takes" from his album "All Things Must Pass", which was released on CD in conjunction with Scorsese's film. IMO, the performances here are often better than what ended up on the 2 LP set, that is, after co-producer Phil Spector had messed around with the songs. & I agree with Olivia Harrison that "these early takes really get to the essence of the songs." (Wikipedia)

    "My Sweet Lord":


    "Awaiting On You All": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5f0FAbP_yJA

    "All Things Must Pass":
    Last edited by Josquin13; Sep-14-2021 at 20:14.

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  19. #119
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
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    Love it! Thanks Josquin!

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  21. #120
    Senior Member Luchesi's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Forster View Post
    In one sense, nobody has: memories are not always reliable.

    In another, the problem is that everybody who has a memory of listening to the Beatles at the time, and has a personal response to report is a reliable witness; certainly my memories are as reliable as anyone else's. Collate them together - there's thousands over time - and you have a massive account of disparate subjective viewpoints, including those of the "average fan", the music critic, the cultural commentator, the news outlets etc etc.

    That's history for you, aside from the "facts" and the numbers.

    Now, what, exactly, is your experience and why do you feel that it gives you such a different perspective that entitles you to refer to others' revisionism?
    'Sorry, I didn't see your reply. Believe me, I love talking about myself and comparing my experiences in music learning. lol

    During the releases of the early albums I was going through those crucial years of exposure, 12 through 14 for boys. My perspective won't likely be available today. The older writers weren't born until the 60s.
    Reminds me of where were you when JFK was gunned down? Or the Moon landings/911 attacks? You had to be there. If you read about it from someone who wasn't born yet, it's a different perspective.
    Last edited by Luchesi; Sep-15-2021 at 01:09.
    Albert Einstein, "I live my daydreams in music. I see my life in terms of music.

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