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Thread: Humoresque for string quartet -- What was my first premiere

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    Junior Member TalkingPie's Avatar
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    Red face Humoresque for string quartet -- What was my first premiere

    This was my first string quartet piece, and my first piece to be publicly performed by others. Here's a recording of the piece:


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    Senior Member Tikoo Tuba's Avatar
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    Tickles my feets for a long pleasant minute , then I have to run away .

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    Wow! Applause! It must be fun to play too.

    Hopefully many more public performances will follow.

    Do you like Kabalevsky?

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    Junior Member TalkingPie's Avatar
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    Thanks!

    I barely know any music by Kabalevsky, I rather had Shostakovich's and Kapustin's music in mind when writing this

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    Senior Member Tikoo Tuba's Avatar
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    I very , very much appreciate your presentation of a score interpreted by musicians . That I may see , that I may hear .
    This is so important .

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tikoo Tuba View Post
    I very , very much appreciate your presentation of a score interpreted by musicians . That I may see , that I may hear .
    This is so important .
    When do we see your work?
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

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    Quote Originally Posted by TalkingPie View Post
    [...] I barely know any music by Kabalevsky, I rather had Shostakovich's and Kapustin's music in mind when writing this
    I thought at Kabalevsky's Clowns when hearing your Humoresque (he wrote it simpler, for beginner pianists), but what I like from him is his first violin concerto

    Will you transcribe your Humoresque for other instrument groups? This gives you more opportunities to be played.

    • 3 clarinets and a bass clarinet.
    • 2 oboes, an English horn and a bassoon.
    • 3 cellos and a contrabass.
    • Saxophone quartet?
    • Wind quintet.
    • Xylophone and marimba.
    • Mandolin and guitar?
    • Wind band.
    • Symphonic orchestra.

    Depending on the software and the way you write the voices, some transcriptions are done quickly.

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    Vio. I and Vio. II have precisely the same sound and achieve surprising synchronization. Any explanation?

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    Junior Member TalkingPie's Avatar
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    idk they're Russians

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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthalpy View Post
    Will you transcribe your Humoresque for other instrument groups?
    Do it yourself and now, or some stranger will do it 70 years after your death.

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    Junior Member TalkingPie's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthalpy View Post
    Do it yourself and now, or some stranger will do it 70 years after your death.
    I'll probably end up putting this piece in a larger work (I have several spare movements for a suite for orchestra or band), so I don't know what the final instrumentation will be

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    You can perfectly integrate one or several pieces in a larger work and still let play them separately. Many orchestral suites are extracted by the composer himself from operas, ballets... Think at the love for three oranges, Prokofiev's Romeo and Juliet, the Polovetsian dances, Ravel's Daphnis et Chloé, Debussy's Pelléas et Mélisande, Ravel's Ma mère l'Oye, and so many more.

    Proposing many orchestrations is a good way to be played more often, and with software, writing for varied groups has become much easier. From a string quartet to a clarinet quartet or double reed quartet, files organized accordingly in LilyPond take half a day. Instead of transcribing one work from time to time, I'd feel reasonable that a composer proposes each piece for a dozen different instrument groups. More satisfaction for less work.

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    This is a funny piece, and I find myself humming the main theme long after listening to this, which is always a good sign

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    Quote Originally Posted by pkoi View Post
    This is a funny piece, and I find myself humming the main theme long after listening to this, which is always a good sign
    Oh, I'm flattered, thanks!

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    If writing for bows, don't hesitate to vary the techniques. This is pleasant to the listeners, and also to the musicians who enjoy the diversity of their instrument, and I dare to say, to show off.

    Not just pizzicato and spiccato. Flageolet, double stops, ricochet, col legno, sul tasto/ponticello, and so on and so forth. There are dozens, many of them are in Paganini's 24th Capriccio, whose score and records are online.

    Some techniques can become quite difficult or impossible. A bow player can usually tell it by seeing the score, for other musicians it's harder to predict.

    Once you embed such sounds in your music, the bow voices are more difficult to transcribe for other instruments.

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