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Thread: Olivia de Havilland: 1916-2020

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    Default Olivia de Havilland: 1916-2020

    What a wonderful, long life - though not without tragedy. Her son Benjamin Goodrich died at 42 after years of gruelling treatment (from age 19) of Hodgkin's Lymphoma.

    De Havilland's death sees the close on the final chapter of the most illustrious phase of popular cinema - and just after the death of Kirk Douglas.

    Here's some stunning photographs of De Havilland from "The Adventures of Robin Hood". In 1938 she was just 22 years old and both she and Flynn looked absolutely beautiful together. The lighting cinematography of Sol Polito in that film rendered Olivia more beautiful than in any other film, IMO.

    She outlived her co-star by nearly 71 years!!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W5rhx-9fmAk

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    She was so classy and beautiful. I had no idea she was still alive at 104. My wife was named after Melanie Hamilton, the character she played in Gone With The Wind.
    Last edited by starthrower; Jul-27-2020 at 14:17.
    "The United States was founded by the brightest people in the country — and we haven't seen them since." - Gore Vidal

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    Senior Member JAS's Avatar
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    Very sorry to hear about her passing, although it was certainly not a great surprise. She made it to a grand old age, and mostly in fairly good health. Norman Lloyd is probably the last link to that era.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAS View Post
    Very sorry to hear about her passing, although it was certainly not a great surprise. She made it to a grand old age, and mostly in fairly good health. Norman Lloyd is probably the last link to that era.
    Norman Lloyd is an incredible 105, though he was never a major star like Olivia de Havilland. Lloyd is famous for uttering "the sleeve...the sleeve" as he slipped from the Statue of Liberty in "Saboteur"!!
    Last edited by Christabel; Jul-27-2020 at 22:16.

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    Senior Member JAS's Avatar
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    No, Lloyd had a long and distinguished career, and was in lots of movies, but he was never really a movie star. I did not mean to suggest that he shared her prominence, but he is the last of an era.
    Last edited by JAS; Jul-27-2020 at 22:28.

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    Quote Originally Posted by JAS View Post
    No, Lloyd had a long and distinguished career, and was in lots of movies, but he was never really a movie star. I did not mean to suggest that he shared her prominence, but he is the last of an era.
    Lloyd is the last of an era; I totally agree.

    Yesterday we watched "Gone With the Wind" again; my spouse had never seen it!! We got to the Intermission and will watch the second half today. We both noticed how FEW slaves and African Americans were represented in the film, except for Mammy, Polk, Uncle Peter and Prissy - who were house servants. Otherwise, they are so seldom in the film I wonder what all the fuss is/was about. The film depicted the hubris and stupidity of the Confederates who thought they could beat the Yankees. That confronting scene on Atlanta Railway Station demonstrated the limits of that hubris. But GWTW was so much more than slavery; it was about courage, loyalty, family values, community, heroism, the ravages of war and the links between the individual and the land on which they live. In that sense the film is an allegory for America and its (largely now lost) national values.

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