Page 1 of 8 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 107

Thread: Do other Baroque composers reach the level of J. S. Bach?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Aug 2018
    Location
    England, Great Britain
    Posts
    198
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Do other Baroque composers reach the level of J. S. Bach?

    A lot of baroque music, written by for example, Handel, Telemann, and Scarlatti never seem to reach the glory of Bach, in particular his huge masterpieces - Goldbergs, Art of Fugue, Passions, ect. Instead many other baroque composers to me feel like general baroque-sounding uninteresting, light footed pieces. But I probably (almost certainly) haven't listened to enough. What do you think?

  2. Likes Roger Knox liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    105
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I’m all for an underdog story, but unfortunately no contemporary of Bach’s is able to hold my attention for long. The top dog still stands strong.

  4. #3
    Senior Member Bulldog's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Albuquerque, New Mexico
    Posts
    28,015
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Check out the generations before Bach - Buxtehude and Froberger are wonderful composers (definitely not light-footed).

  5. Likes Highwayman liked this post
  6. #4
    Senior Member flamencosketches's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    the Deep South
    Posts
    6,533
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm rather new to Baroque music beyond Bach but I would definitely say that much of Handel's work is on the level of Bach, if not exactly similar to Bach.

  7. Likes adriesba, Josquin13, StrE3ss liked this post
  8. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    434
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Messiah comes close to the St. Matthew Passion. Israel in Egypt, Solomon, Saul, Jephtha, and Theodora are about as good as the Christmas Oratorio and better than the Easter Oratorio.

    Vivaldi's concertos are better than some of Bach's.

  9. Likes Josquin13 liked this post
  10. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2017
    Location
    Toronto, Canada
    Posts
    3,642
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I feel that Domenico Scarlatti's sonatas are a whole different world than Bach -- whether played on harpsichord or piano. Jean-Philippe Rameau's instrumental music and operas -- Les Indes Galantes is an opera-ballet I like. Henry Purcell, Marin Marais (viola da gamba), Marc-Antoine Charpentier (choral and stage music), & T. Albinoni and G. Torelli (string orchestra) are favourites of mine from the preceding generation

  11. Likes amfortas, adriesba liked this post
  12. #7
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    2,441
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Vivaldi seems pretty individual in style. Listen to the beginning of this, for example: "In furore iustissimae irae"

  13. #8
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    2,441
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bulldog View Post
    Check out the generations before Bach - Buxtehude and Froberger are wonderful composers (definitely not light-footed).
    I'm more into those "post-Bach" masters: J.E. Eberlin (1702~1762), J.A. Hasse (1699~1783), C.P.E. Bach (1714~1788)



    Last edited by hammeredklavier; Sep-19-2020 at 06:19.

  14. #9
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2018
    Posts
    2,441
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default


  15. #10
    Senior Member Art Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kampen (NL)
    Posts
    25,532
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    For me, no. NO. Light years apart. And certainly not Handel. And most certainly not the Messiah.
    I treat my music like I treat my pets. It’s something to own, care about and curate with attention to detail. From a blog by hjr.

  16. Likes leonsm liked this post
  17. #11
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    390
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    It's more about what they offer that is different stylistically.








    I would never mistake any of these for Bach, and love them for qualities I don't hear in his music at all. To me Handel has one of the most forcefully distinct voices ever, and I prefer it to Bach's even though Bach is "better" overall.

    ...I unfortunately agree that Scarlatti is boring.
    Last edited by Clairvoyance Enough; Sep-19-2020 at 09:25.

  18. #12
    Senior Member Fabulin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2019
    Posts
    933
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by hammeredklavier View Post
    Vivaldi seems pretty individual in style. Listen to the beginning of this, for example: "In furore iustissimae irae"
    I often get the impression that Vivaldi could do things only Mozart would otherwise reliably do, two generations later. And he doesn't get enough credit for that.
    Last edited by Fabulin; Sep-19-2020 at 10:44.

  19. Likes flamencosketches, Chilham liked this post
  20. #13
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    8,942
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Only Handel comes close although his music is so different that it is hard to compare them. It is a poor caricature but I think of Bach as concerned with the infinite and Handel with the human. Still, we would be very much the poorer - and would have such a warped idea of the creative explosion of the Baroque - if we didn't have Vivaldi, Telemann, Purcell, Monteverdi ..... and so very many others.

  21. #14
    Senior Member Jacck's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2017
    Location
    Czech Republic
    Posts
    4,650
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BenG View Post
    A lot of baroque music, written by for example, Handel, Telemann, and Scarlatti never seem to reach the glory of Bach, in particular his huge masterpieces - Goldbergs, Art of Fugue, Passions, ect. Instead many other baroque composers to me feel like general baroque-sounding uninteresting, light footed pieces. But I probably (almost certainly) haven't listened to enough. What do you think?
    none likely reaches his level of mastery of counterpoint, but yes, there are many excellent baroque composers worth exploring. Their music might not be exactly like Bach, but different, great in other ways. Vivaldi, Rameau, Purcell, Biber, Elisabeth Jacquet de La Guerre, Lully, Charpentier, Zelenka, Barbara Strozzi, Pergolesi, Scarlatti

    Rameau


    Purcell


    Biber Mystery Sonatas


    Élisabeth Jacquet de la Guerre – Pièces de Clavecin


    Zelenka: Missa Omnium Sanctorum

  22. Likes adriesba liked this post
  23. #15
    Senior Member Phil loves classical's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2017
    Location
    Ford Nation
    Posts
    5,232
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    I'm way more moved by adagios from Vivaldi and Corelli than anything by Bach. Handel also wrote magnificent, stirring music. But in counterpoint Bach was supreme.
    "Forgive me, Majesty. I'm a vulgar man. But I assure you, my music is not.“ Mozart

  24. Likes Josquin13 liked this post
Page 1 of 8 12345 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •