Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast
Results 16 to 30 of 139

Thread: 21st Century Chamber Music

  1. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,084
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    This is a new CD for me, I mean, I listened to it for the first time today. It made me think of a remark someone I know made about how tonal, measured, contemplative is the central trend in classical music of the first part of this century.


    In the booklet the pianist writes

    Nocturnes & Lullabies reflects a continuing fascination with the piano as an instrument of resonance and an interactive meditative tool. It is a collection of pieces which interested me for the better part of the 2010’s, that all seemed tied to themes of nocturnal existence, soporific states, and the liminal states between light and dark, life and death, the conscious and unconscious self. At that time especially, I was focused on cultivating a sort of pianistic “anti-virtuosity” (at least in the conventional sense), performing music that seems simple on the surface but in actuality affords a great many challenges, both in execution and interpretation.

    All but one of the works featured on this album are premiere recordings, and the composers are people to whom I have been connected and by whom I have been inspired for several years. In more than one instance, they are also personal friends and tireless advocates. After several years of recital presentations in various combinations, it is meaningful to present these works on this album: a document and format that is by no means definitive—either collectively or in part, conceptually or practically—but reflects a certain depth of care and understanding that comes from living with and thinking about these special pieces of music as intrinsically related for a prolonged period of time. The listening journey is an inverted arch-form, a descent into a lucid dream-state or waking reverie. These tableaux are excerpts from the continuum of consciousness—evoking profound existential questions, mundane meanderings, and poignant ephemeralities.
    fcr243_cover.0x390.jpg

    some details here

    https://www.newfocusrecordings.com/c...nes-lullabies/

    And a track by Rebecca Saunders here


  2. Likes SanAntone, tortkis liked this post
  3. #17
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,018
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    I was disappointed to discover that only excerpts are available on YouTube of Linda Catlin Smith's work.
    Through the Low Hills [piano & cello] [1994]
    Memory Forms [orchestra] [1995]
    With their Shadows Long [piano & violin] [1997]
    Among the Tarnished Stars [clarinet, piano, violin & cello] [1998]
    Knotted Silk [clarinet, trumpet, 2 percussion, piano, violin & double bass] [1999]
    Moi qui tramblais [percussion, piano & violin] [1999]

    I agree with the comments made about her link to Feldman. I also agree that it would be hard to express an influence of Feldman without lapsing into imitation.

    Feldman is somewhat like Thelonious Monk in that regard: his style is so distinctive it would be difficult, if not impossible, to emulate his priorities and produce something "yours" and new.
    So I somewhat take back what I said, having re-listened to a couple of the works above. While they emulate Feldman in that a chord slowly modulates a little at a time with no destination in sight, they are different when they occasionally drift into a tonal setting; the modulations themselves also seem, on the one hand, rather restricted and, on the other hand, rather free. There are sections where the chords refuse to change at all except in their presentation, and then there are other sections where new notes come out of left field. In Feldman, the drifting effect seems a bit more steady.

    Then again, now that I'm thinking about it, Feldman does all this too. So I don't know. I guess I'm back to my original position. I wonder if the shortness of Linda Catlin Smith's music is forcing me to read something different in her works (different from Feldman's, that is) that isn't really there.

    Again, it should be said, though I think she is imitating her teacher, I don't have any problems with it. I do like the music, which is the only thing that matters for me.
    Last edited by calvinpv; Sep-30-2020 at 20:12.

  4. Likes SeptimalTritone liked this post
  5. #18
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Dec 2016
    Posts
    3,136
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by calvinpv View Post
    Then again, now that I'm thinking about it, Feldman does all this too. So I don't know. I guess I'm back to my original position. I wonder if the shortness of Linda Catlin Smith's music is forcing me to read something different in her works (different from Feldman's, that is) that isn't really there.

    Again, it should be said, though I think she is imitating her teacher, I don't have any problems with it. I do like the music, which is the only thing that matters for me.
    I get what you're saying. In many respects the "post-Feldman school" seems like an artistic dead-end. It's been very difficult for composers to emulate Feldman without sounding like a second-rate version of him. Wandelweiser intrigues me, but I don't really think they bring anything new to the table. In my opinion contemporary music is by and large operating on a feedback loop; composers endlessly recycle the same Feldman/Ligeti/Lachenmann cannon without reacting to their own times in an interesting way. I suppose that's what happens when a culture gets to be too insular.
    Last edited by Portamento; Sep-30-2020 at 20:28.

  6. #19
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,924
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Portamento View Post
    I get what you're saying. In many respects the "post-Feldman school" seems like an artistic dead-end. It's been very difficult for composers to emulate Feldman without sounding like a second-rate version of him. Wandelweiser intrigues me, but I don't really think they bring anything new to the table. In my opinion contemporary music is by and large operating on a feedback loop; composers endlessly recycle the same Feldman/Ligeti/Lachenmann cannon without reacting to their own times in an interesting way. I suppose that's what happens when a culture gets to be too insular.
    I feel somewhat differently than you have described in this post.

    I don't know if I've posted this before, but this string quartet I think is a good example of what new composers are doing that is distinct from the composers you named.



    But as I haven't listened to Ligeti and Lachenmann in a long time, I may be missing something. But it does not sound anything like Feldman.
    Last edited by SanAntone; Sep-30-2020 at 21:11.

  7. Likes GucciManeIsTheNewWebern liked this post
  8. #20
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,084
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Very excited by this video

    discovery

  9. #21
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,924
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    And then there a whole group of composers using voice in their works






  10. #22
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,924
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by calvinpv View Post
    Through the Low Hills [piano & cello] [1994]
    Memory Forms [orchestra] [1995]
    With their Shadows Long [piano & violin] [1997]
    Among the Tarnished Stars [clarinet, piano, violin & cello] [1998]
    Knotted Silk [clarinet, trumpet, 2 percussion, piano, violin & double bass] [1999]
    Moi qui tramblais [percussion, piano & violin] [1999]
    Thanks for these. I admit I didn't search long.

  11. #23
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,018
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Have you heard Soper's Voices from the Killing Jar? It's probably one of the most innovative song cycles I've heard in a long time.

    Program note here. You can also read the libretto at the beginning of the video if you pause it.

    And, yes, Nadja is a pretty good piece.

    Last edited by calvinpv; Oct-01-2020 at 05:07.

  12. Likes SeptimalTritone liked this post
  13. #24
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,924
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by calvinpv View Post
    Have you heard Soper's Voices from the Killing Jar? It's probably one of the most innovative song cycles I've heard in a long time.

    Program note here. You can also read the libretto at the beginning of the video if you pause it.

    And, yes, Nadja is a pretty good piece.

    Yes, I know Killing Jar; you're right it is an impressive piece of work. I interviewed Kate in 2016 and, along with her talent, was impressed with two things about her: one, she has a strong sense of discipline and working routine and, she is a fan of Guillaume de Machaut (one of my own favorite composers).
    Last edited by SanAntone; Oct-01-2020 at 05:21.

  14. Likes SeptimalTritone liked this post
  15. #25
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,924
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    Hakki Cengiz Eren — O Yer (2017)
    performed by Ensemble Composit

    More about the composer here.

  16. #26
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Location
    Tennessee
    Posts
    7,924
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    Samir Amarouch — Lighting, for 9 musicians (2013)
    performed by Edouard Boze (Conductor), Enguerrand Moutonnier (Organ), Alexandrine Monnot (Voice 1), Raphaëlle Soumagnas (Voice 2), Samuel Bricault (Flute 1), Gilles Stoesel (Flute 2), Paul Dujoncquoy (Clarinet), Emma Jane Lloyd (Violin), Ieva Struoggyte (Viola), Lucien Debon (Cello), Aurélien Bourgois, Charles De Cillia, & Paul Lambert de Gersay (sound), Aurélien Bourgois (Edit & Mix)

    Composer website here.

    Paris-based composer, Samir Amarouch writes music equally inspired by composers such as Grisey, Sciarrino or Romitelli, by the electronic musicians such as Rashad Becker, Oval, or Mark Fell, and by traditional music, such as Gnawa music. Transcribing in the instrumental or vocal domain natural sounds (bird songs, wolves howling sound, or other soundscape) and artificial sounds (as synthetic sounds, vocoder, or others effects from electronic music), he develops a unique aesthetic querying our relationship with environment and technology.


    He worked with the Ensemble InterContemporain, the Lucern Alumni Ensemble, the harpsichord player Orlando Bass, the conductor Simon Proust, InSolitus Ensemble, Vocalists 20.21., the german Mozaik Ensemble, and the symphonic orchestra Orchestre +. Current projects include a new work for quadriphony premiered in march 2019 and a duo saxophone & cello for june 2019.

  17. #27
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,018
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Rihm: Nachstudie for piano solo (1992-1994)
    Rihm: Sphäre um Sphäre, for 11 musicians (1992-2003)

    So after having presented Rihm's Jagden und Formen and related pieces in the 1980-2000 listening group, I've been delving into Rihm's oeuvre as a whole. Yesterday, I just finished listening to two pieces from his Sphären cycle of works: Nachstudie and Sphäre um Sphäre.

    The basic idea behind this cycle, as well as the Formen, fleuve, Séraphin, Chiffre, Über die Linie and Verwandlung cycles, is the idea of "overpainting", where Rihm will take music that he's already written and add new layers of music on top. This could mean adding new parts or subtracting/modifying old parts (a sort of vertical layering); it could also mean cutting up an old piece and adding insertions in between sections or taking away sections (a sort of horizontal layering). This may seem like a lazy way to compose, but on the contrary, it opens up new ways of understanding how pieces in general are put together. Case in point: understanding Rihm's music as composed of layers raises the question of whether there is a final version of a work, since layering is a process that has no inherent limits. Thus, many of Rihm's works could be said to be in "moment form" or "open form".

    Anyways, Nachstudie and Sphäre um Sphäre is constructed as follows. Rihm wrote a piece called -et nunc for winds, brass and percussion; he later added 81 bars to get -et nunc II. He then added a piano part plus 30 new bars to get Sphere. Rihm then extracted the piano part to make the solo piano piece Nachstudie. A few years later he puts the piano part back into an ensemble setting which includes a second piano to get Sphäre um Sphäre (this ensemble setting is completely different to Sphere).

    The piano part asks for the player to always hold the sustain pedal so that the resonance from the piano never dies out. And the piano writing itself suggests response and echo: after a gesture gets played, it gets repeated immediately with a louder dynamic, shorter duration and/or stronger attack. Why does knowing all this matter? Because it informs us of how to appreciate the piano part for each of these pieces. Depending on the context, the same piano part will contribute to a different way of listening and appreciating the music and will focus our ears towards different understandings of the "resonance" involved.

    When you hear the piano by itself in Nachstudie, the lack of other instruments allows you to hear the piano resonance naked without any adornments. This instructs your ears to listen to the music as a meditation on the nature of the piano itself (the aura, or “sphere”, of the piano) and to hear all its overtones and to appreciate the sounds in the moment before they decay into oblivion.

    But when you hear Sphäre um Sphäre, the same piano part is interweaved with other instruments (including a second piano) who all play the same or nearly the same notes as the piano in any given moment. In this piece, the resonance of the piano itself can no longer be heard, but there is a “resonance” of sorts between the instruments, instructing your ear to no longer understand resonance as a physical phenomenon but as an abstract one that is created from formal relations (in this case the relation of identity, since they all play the same notes).

    These two works are good enough to be heard on their own. But I also recommend listening to them back-to-back. In fact, though this may sound counterintuitive, I’m coming to the conclusion that in order to really understand what Rihm’s doing with his music, you ought to listen to whole cycles of works back-to-back instead of hearing single works at a time.

    Score of Sphäre um Sphäre here (to read the score for Nachstudie, just read the piano part of Sphäre nach Studie here; this work is another in the Sphären cycle, but there's no recording of it, unfortunately).



    Last edited by calvinpv; Oct-03-2020 at 04:53.

  18. Likes SanAntone, Portamento liked this post
  19. #28
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    9,084
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    Do we know why these pieces are spherical?

    Am I right to think that in the Sphäre series, Rihm doesn’t take inspiration from existing musics - in the way that he is inspired by Janacek for example, or Schumann, in other chamber pieces?

    I have a CD with another Sphäre piece Séraphin-Sphäre, and it includes the “4 male” for solo clarinet, I don’t know if the solo clarinet music is all part of the Sphäre project.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Oct-03-2020 at 03:57.

  20. #29
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,018
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    Do we know why these pieces are spherical?
    I think the word "sphere" is referring to the 'sphere of influence' of the piano, the piano's sound world and its gravitational pull on the surrounding instruments (in Nachstudie, it's the only instrument, so its sound world equals the sound world of the entire piece). If you listen closely to Sphäre um Sphäre, the pitches used on the piano get reflected into the other instruments as a sort of echo effect (though often they play simultaneously, and occasionally it's the piano that serves as the echo). One could even argue this is a tonal work in the broadest sense of the term, though the tonal center changes from gesture to gesture in the piano.

    Am I right to think that in the Sphäre series, Rihm doesn’t take inspiration from existing musics - in the way that he is inspired by Janacek for example, or Schumann, in other chamber pieces?
    To my knowledge, no. In fact, from what I can gather, most of Rihm's works that involve direct quotation or stylistic imitations of other composers come early in his career, and one could say his later works involve quotations of *his own* music (Jagden und Formen being a great example of this).

    I have a CD with another Sphäre piece Séraphin-Sphäre, and it includes the “4 male” for solo clarinet, I don’t know if the solo clarinet music is all part of the Sphäre project.
    It's not.

    The Sphären cycle includes (in chronological order): -et nunc I, -et nunc II, Sphere, Nachstudie, Sphäre nach Studie, Sphäre um Sphäre, and Séraphin-Sphäre. The two -et nunc pieces are also the foundation works to the fleuve cycle, and Séraphin-Sphäre is also in the Séraphin cycle.
    Last edited by calvinpv; Oct-03-2020 at 05:14.

  21. #30
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Posts
    2,018
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Here's a 2nd recording of Sphäre um Sphäre. This is the CD that also contains Vier Male that Mandryka asked about.


Page 2 of 10 FirstFirst 123456 ... LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •