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Thread: 21st Century Chamber Music

  1. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Interesting, but I felt it was too long. I liked the colors and textures, reminded me a little of '70s Miles Davis.
    Make me a Miles Davies listening list.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    Make me a Miles Davies listening list.
    I was mainly thinking of "He Loved Him Madly" from the Get Up With It album.



    It's a 32 minute work, and about 18 minutes in I think the similarity becomes more clear; or not.

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  4. #93
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    Thanks, nice.

    Here's something by Cassandra Miller. It's a strange sound world, new and for me quite exciting.

    https://vimeo.com/318742115

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  6. #94
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Evan JohnsonL'art de toucher le clavecin, 3



    L’art de toucher le clavecin is the title of a famous instructional pamphlet by François Couperin, the master claveciniste of the French Baroque, which gives a concise but invaluable guide to interpretation, performance, and ornamentation of the singular keyboard music of that time and place.

    The present series of works (a forthcoming piccolo solo, L’art de toucher le clavecin, 2 for piccolo with violin [2009], and this trio) forms, I suppose, some sort of oblique homage to Couperin’s aesthetic of ornamented surface, of a simple ground-gesture that is forced to proliferate if it wants to inhabit a space. Most obviously, there is “melodic” ornamentation everywhere, not only where one expects to see it—in the form of trills, mordents, and other related figures adorning fundamentally simple gestures of pitch, bow, and breath—but also in the structure of the piece, which takes the form of a fitful and gap-filled flowering of a small stable of “stock figures.”

    L’art de toucher le clavecin, 3 is based on the previously composed duo for piccolo with violin. The insinuating presence of the percussion is an excuse to disarm the forces that shape the duo into a singular whole. Instead, here is a collection of fragments, sorted into three separately programmed “sequences” and, within each sequence, separated by pauses or frozen events that disperse accumulated energies and enforce an uneasy calm. The spikes and eddies of the duo are smoothed out, replaced by a uniformly stifled dynamic level and a reduced sound palette, wiped over by sandblocks or gently articulated by muffled crotales and small wooden percussion, the regular pulses that were buried by figuration in the duet brought gently if vaguely to the fore. (composer program note)

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    Sarah HenniesSpectral Malsconcities (2018)



    performed by Bearthoven: Karl Larson (piano), Pat Swoboda (bass), Matt Evans (percussion)

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    Quote Originally Posted by Mandryka View Post
    Thanks, nice.

    Here's something by Cassandra Miller. It's a strange sound world, new and for me quite exciting.

    https://vimeo.com/318742115
    Cassandra Miller is great!

  11. #97
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    Quote Originally Posted by Portamento View Post
    Cassandra Miller is great!
    Yesterday I treated myself to this

    0534C29C-821E-48E6-AB82-63388B47F663.jpeg

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    Saariaho - Cloud Trio

    Last edited by GucciManeIsTheNewWebern; Apr-13-2021 at 08:58.

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    Charmaine LeeSmoke, Airs



    Fascinating work, exploring sound and texture in what I consider a unique manner, successfully captured in her non-traditional notation.

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    Lidia Zielinska (born 1953)

    Threesome C
    The music begins immediately and quietly, before a climatic crescendo at about [1:15].

    Last edited by ArtMusic; Apr-15-2021 at 10:25.

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    The Imani Winds are a woodwind quintet that specializes in contemporary music, including music composed by some of its own members, as here. A lot to choose from.


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  18. #102
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    Hèctor ParraEarly Life (2010)
    performed by Ensemble Recherche



    Program Note by the Composer

    EARLY LIFE (2010)


    We know that all life on Earth, including ourselves, descends from a common ancestor cellular organism, product of a long development. Now the crucial question is: what happened before? According to biologists, life is primarily about “particular systems” more than “specific substances” or concrete materials. Accordingly, we can conceive organisms as machines and life as natural engineering. But the first organisms had to start without any pre-existing technology: something began to evolve, building a technology and transforming matter into survival machines. Once originated, the same process could easily have been transformed by its own effects -like the sound materials in a musical piece...

    In Early Life, for oboe, piano and string trio, I attempt to create a musical structure inspired by this large scale biological process by which life could have been originated on our planet. The especially appealing theory called “Genetic Takeover”, by the Scottish biochemist Graham Cairns-Smith, presents a model of life origins based on mineral replication. According to it, life may have begun in the form of replicating inorganic crystals in constant evolution and adapted to the environment. The first genes may have consisted in the replication of "defects" in crystal lattices. There are three types of defective structures in some clay crystals: missing atoms, substitution of some atoms by others and molecular dislocations. These defects could be faithfully replicated, and the defective structures may have grown along planes containing the “defective” information across the direction of crystal growth. The “relevant defects”, instead of being eliminated, would have been replicated.

    So, Early Life begins without oboe, and with the strings and prepared piano (more percussive than usual) playing relatively symmetrical and short patterns inspired by crystal lattices. The rhythmic complexity and timbrical richness associated to such patterns will grow progressively and reach their peak at the central part of the piece. These patterns –musical genes, contain small errors in the form of changes in the way of playing, unexpected pauses, interspersed exchanges in the order that the instruments perform certain rhythms, accents that create a sense of disruption of these symmetrical elements... And, as in the biological evolutionary processes, there is no way back.

    Hence, in the beginning, different types of texture, corresponding to different types of clay crystals susceptibles to evolve, are presented. But only one of these “acoustic phenotypes” will quickly evolve and become the “matrix for the ancestor”.
    Turning to the fascinating Takeover theory, Cairns-Smith tells that over time, some clay crystals developed the ability to synthesize organic molecules through photosynthesis. These early pre-cellular organisms began to build membranes, microtubules, interconnected compartments that helped such synthesis. This led to organisms that contained inorganic genes but also organic genes. The control of their own synthesis and replication -originally piloted by the inorganic (mineral) “genes”, was progressively transmitted to the organic genes (nucleic acids), which from then operated by the protein synthesis. And there is no doubt that molecular organic life was finally the most effective option.

    This genetic takeover inspired me the inner core of the musical structure of Early Life. In this way, once the phrases or “musical genes” performed by the string trio and the piano have become more rich, varied, and the interrelations of materials and sound textures have turned more complex, the oboe (the organic world) enters and a new musical architecture emerges. What was percussive, without resonance, discordant, coarse, inert and discrete becomes multiforme, polyphonic, harmonic, continuous and organic.

    The emergence of a continuous flow in which the melodic discourse and its global harmonic interaction associated to a variety of timbres that appear under the presence of the oboe, are intended to create a timbral-temporal continuum tissue made of multiple voices and possessing the life dramatic character. Hence, the second part of Early life becomes a "microdrama" with the oboe as a soloist.

    In Early Life, I have mantained a symbiotic relationship with the outstanding Chilean oboist Jaime Gonzalez. The immensely rich sound palette and his expressive and emotional ductility, coupled with his microscopic articulation precision have made possible the crystallization of this work. Moreover, I have had the privilege to develop the instrumental and pianistic language of Early Life with the whole of the Ensemble Recherche, that gave an outstanding premiere.

    The piece, commissioned by the Ernst von Siemens Music Foundation for its ceremony awards 2011 in Munich, is dedicated to Jaime Gonzalez and Ensemble Recherche, with friendship, gratitude and admiration.
    Hèctor Parra, 2010-11

  19. #103
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    TED HEARNE

    notes: Furtive movements is a piece for cello and percussion, performed in four consecutive sections with no breaks. It lasts about 14 minutes, and was commissioned by the St. Paul Chamber Orchestra, for Ashley Bathgate and Ian Ding.

    Furtive movements is a phrase found in many reports from the New York City Police Department: it is the most commonly cited reason individuals were detained under the Stop and Frisk policy. This phrase is striking to me, because it claims to describe a person's movements but really speaks more to the expectations of the officer observing them. The phrase conveys the assumption of guilt -- furtiveness -- based on appearance or demeanor in a given moment.

    Writing this piece, I was inspired by the idea of freeing an individual from the role(s) they may be expected to fulfill. The cello and the drum set (timbrally and acoustically very different forces) may be more easily defined by their differences than their similarities. So my challenge in writing Furtive movements was to call their assumed identities into question and to try and blur the lines between their musical roles. Rhythmic and melodic responsibilities are shifted fluidly between players, and there are long passages where the instruments play in unison.

    I also chose to "prepare" the cello by wedging a wine cork between the two middle strings. This enables the cello to make startling unique sounds (harsh and distorted at sometimes, gong-like at others), and also very much obstructs the instrument's ability to project sound in the way it was intended.


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  21. #104
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    Richard BarrettPoliteia from Construction



    Politeia is a component of Richard Barrett's massive work, Construction, which is the is the eighth and final composition of his series entitled 'resistance & vision'
    http://richardbarrettmusic.com/​

    Performed by Elision Ensemble
    Genevieve Lacey (recorder ), Carl Rosman (tenor saxophone), Richard Haynes (baritone saxophone), Timothy O'Dwyer (bass saxophone), Dafne Vincente-Sandoval (bassoon), Tristram Williams (flugelhorn), Benjamin Marks (trombone), Marshall McGuire (baroque double harp), Daryl Buckley (electric guitar), Domenico Melchiorre (percussion), Graeme Jennings (violin), Erkki Veltheim (viola), Séverine Ballon (cello), ELISION Ensemble conducted by Eugene Ughetti
    Daryl Buckley (artistic director)
    http://www.elision.org.au/​

    This work is divided into two ensembles: a quintet & an octet (designated by different 'fonts'). These ensembles are often juxtaposed while playing starkly disparate textures and meters. The contrast is so substantial that the two ensembles cannot be represented in a vertical format in a traditional score; indeed, Barrett wrote them out sequentially, providing instructions for when the ensembles should play simultaneously. I hope that this Score Follower helps to demonstrate the 'counterpoint of forces' in a somewhat linear fashion.

  22. #105
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Christopher CerroneMemory Palace (2012)
    performed by Ian Rosenbaum

    Last edited by SanAntone; Apr-25-2021 at 15:32.

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