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Thread: 21st Century Chamber Music

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    Senior Member fluteman's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Annika SocolofskyOne wish, your honey lips
    performed by Emissary Quartet (flute quartet)



    Composer's note:
    I like the traditional American folk song vibe of this. The flute has always been a stand in for the human voice, but the "standard" western classical technique is still designed to produce the late 19th century European bel canto opera aria sound. In general I like experimentation with different sonorities (also the Papageorgiu below with its Eric Dolphy / prog jazz flute sound), even though it takes a completely different technique to play, alas.

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    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Andrea Tarrodi : Empireo (2011)
    Orchestration: String Quintet, Hp, Perc



    Patrik Swedrup, Johannes Lörstad, violins
    Riikka Repo, viola
    Mikael Sjögren, cello
    Valur Pálsson, contrabass
    Laura Stephenson, harp
    Daniel Kåse, percussion (Live)

    Note from composer's website:

    Empíreo was commissioned by the Stockholm Concert Hall. The piece was premiered in October 2011 by Laura Stephenson, harp, Daniel Kåse, percussion, Patrik Swedrup, violin, Johannes Lörstad, violin, Riikka Repo, viola, and Mikael Sjögren, cello. In 2012 Tarrodi received the Swedish MPA:s Classical Music Award of the Year - chamber music for Empíreo.

    Comment: "Empíreo - for strings harp & percussion was inspired by Isaac Grünewald´s ceiling painting in the Grünewald hall in the Stockholm Concert Hall. "Empíreo" is Spanish for "empyrean". Empyrean, from the Medieval Latin empyreus is the place in the highest heaven, which in ancient cosmologies was supposed to be occupied by the element of fire. The piece was based on musical material from two och my earlier works (also them inspired by Grünewalds paintings in the hall); Chárites for harp and percussion and Miroirs for string quartet. Throughout 'Empíreo'you may recognize developed themes and phrases from those two pieces."

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    Philippe Manoury: Le Temps, mode d'emploi (Time, A User's Manual), for two pianos and live electronics (2014)

    Performers: GrauSchumacher Piano Duo, Experimentalstudio des SWR

    I believe this video is the world premier performance at the 2014 Wittener Tage für neue Kammermusik.

    From the liner notes of a later commercial recording:

    Le Temps, mode d'emploi is a large musical fresco on various ways to express time. Contemplative or active time, delayed or real time, continuous, or discontinuous, smooth or pulsed, suspended, revisited, circular, diffracted ... the physical or musical time but also the psychic time. Time is not just a repository containing our lives, actions and perceptions, it could have its own structure, a sort of envelop which put a mark on us. Music was always the best way to express that, much better than any other medium. Before having written a single note, I decided to work based on these modes of temporal organization. The two pianos are surrounded by four virtual pianos and a very complex system of sound synthesis, signal processing and spatialization. Composed in eight sections, which are linked, and responding to each other, the work covers 58 minutes. --Philippe Manoury

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    Philippe Manoury: B-Partita (à la memoire de Pierre Boulez), for violin, ensemble and live electronics (2016)

    “In ‘B-Partita’, an instrumental ensemble is added to the initial nucleus consisting of just the solo instrument and the electronics. The work is actually an extension of Partita II for violin and electronics, following the example of Sequenze and Chemins by Luciano Berio. The violin part and the electronics of Partita II remain practically unchanged, while the instrumental ensemble shines its commentary and counterpoints through the cracks that open up between the different sequences of the original.

    This game of to-and-fro, between rigor and liberty, is facilitated by the use of computer music, thanks in particular to the software Antescofo, which allows the generated music to follow the musician in real time (...). These are algorithms – often a superposition of fairly complex loops that are designed so as not to fall into any arbitrary cyclicity, connected to each other and interacting with each other – which are defined only to the extent of how they begin and how they evolve the sound ... but which then run in a quasi-self-generating, autonomous mode.

    The relationship between the soloist and the electronics is highly interactive. It is always the soloist who determines and changes the tempi of the different superimposed layers of electronic music on which the ensemble will then synchronize. These processes are not seen as loops, but as forms that are constantly changing and which give a sense of flexibility and uncertainty. This process relies on coincidence ... albeit a controlled coincidence (...). These layers evolve independently from each other, as if suspended in air. The solo violin, for instance, modifies the trajectory of one of those layers so that each interpretation of ‘B-Partita’ will never reproduce the same superimpositions. In ‘B-Partita’, for example, the instrumentalists of the ensemble sometimes play outside the control of the conductor. In some sequences, the strings choose what they play, quite freely. These are what I call ‘musical backgrounds:’ polyrhythmic loops distributed between several instruments. Together with the sound of the ensemble, we obtain rich textures from rather simple material. The same technique is used for the electronic part. These backgrounds are metamorphosed imperceptibly, a little like a cloud undergoes transformations so slowly that the eye cannot perceive the change. It is therefore up to perception to draw on memory to observe the transformation.”

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    Philippe Manoury: Tensio (Tension), for string quartet and live electronics (2010)

    There's no need to read the links below (its beauty ought to be apparent, especially if you liked the two Manoury works I posted above), but since there's a wealth of documentation on Tensio written by Manoury himself, I'm just going to post it here for convenience. I haven't gone through it all myself, but this work seems to be a sort of mini milestone in the development of real-time digital signal processing, in the way certain complicated bow movements are tracked by the computer. Apologies if a lot of it is in French; just run it through google translate, and the English version will be pretty decent.

    Both videos below are played by Quatuor Diotima, both very good performances. The first has more seamless integration of instrumental and electronic sounds, but the audio quality is a little poor. The second link below has audio samples from this performance that are clearer in quality.

    score

    Les procédés de composition utilisés dans "Tensio" (in French, has several sound samples)
    Compositional Procedures in "Tensio" (English version of above link, no sound samples)
    Entretien avec Eric Denut (à propos de “Tensio”) (in French, two interviews)
    Tensio de Philippe Manoury (video interview, English subtitles)
    Conférence sur "Tensio" (lecture, no English subtitles)

    Some related material to Tensio, but not about Tensio per se:
    Les partitions virtuelles (in French, no samples)
    Les Grammaires Musicales Génératives (in French, many sound samples from other Manoury works)
    Les chaînes de Markov… à l’infini (in French, many sound samples from other works)
    Keeping Real-Time Electronic Music Alive (English)

    Program note:

    When I compose, one of the great difficulties lies in the choice of the title. With me, the choice of notes, rhythms and sounds is nothing compared to that of the title. The title must summarise, signify and identify even though it can evoke and suggest. How to summarise a piece of music when it is so difficult (but not impossible) to speak about it? But one day, you have to choose. So I chose Tensio. It is an Italian word which means ‘tension’. My first quartet is called Stringendo and the following ones – the ones I plan to write – will all have Italian names, not German ones (a way to deterritorialise history). The tension in question here is physical: it is that of the strings, which are stretched over the instruments that will play, and which I have exacerbated in the electronic music part. It seemed to me to be beneficial to return to the primordial image of a rope stretched between two points and to make it play in extreme regimes that only technology can glimpse. But other variations of tension, more psychological and more musical, will be able to arise, I hope, from listening to this quartet.

    Tensio is probably the most experimental work I have composed to date. Its gestation and composition spanned nearly two years; the quartet implements a large number of new musical practices that technology has developed in recent years, and which had to be experimented and perfected; such as, the synthesis by physical model, the interactive synthesis of inharmonic sounds, the harmonic sound tops and the tempo tracking of the instruments. Another line of research has also been undertaken on acoustic descriptors which should ultimately make it possible to obtain a fine and stable analysis of instrumental sounds in real-time.

    The first part of Tensio presents a music of extreme mobility which involves the real quartet as well as a virtual quartet, entirely composed of synthetic sounds (the [computer] programme Synful by Eric Lindemann). The sound materials travel from one to the other in a form built on what I call ‘generative musical grammars’. It is a question of building a piece of music starting from rules of chains between figures, a little like the construction of language. It seems to me to be more and more important in music not to focus exclusively on what we have to say, but also on the moment when we are going to say it.

    The second part uses a new synthesis model, recently developed by Matthias Demoucron at IRCAM, which is based on a physical modelling of a string stretched over a violin resonance box. This is where the ‘tensio’ is most audible. This model simulates the pressures, speeds and positions of a virtual bow on this imaginary string. I discovered here quite surprising sound categories when one pushes to certain extremes of traditional ways of playing in areas that are hardly accessible to human physiology. The combination of exaggerated pressure from a bow on a string, with almost zero speed, produces ‘shapes’ of small high pitched sound droplets which a priori do not seem to come from a violin. And the most curious – but also the most interesting – aspect of this phenomenon lies in the fact that, despite this difference in sound, we still hear a string stretched under the pressure of friction. In this section, I used a very innovative aspect of score tracking developed by Arshia Cont: continuous tempo tracking. Electronic events are recorded on a score which automatically adapts its tempo to that of the fluctuating instruments. Until now, instruments have triggered electronic sound events in a discontinuous time: a note triggers an event, then another, etc. From now on, the two discourses are united and merged in a single continuous time over which the instrumentalists have control.

    The third part is a kind of interlude based on harmonic glissandi and, therefore, eliminates the ‘tensio’ from the previous section. You just have to barely touch the strings to produce these harmonics.

    In the fourth section comes a new system of sound synthesis. I have wanted for a long time to compose electronic music whose sounds would no longer be planned in advance, but deduced from the analysis of instrumental sounds during performance. (I had worked out situations approaching this idea in Pluto.) Miller Puckette finally offered me the solution. Each instrumental sound that is played is analysed in its pitch and is used to construct complex, inharmonic sounds, the density of which varies according to the ratio of the instrumental sounds. Thus, when all the instruments are in unison, the synthetic music agrees with them, and when they play different sounds, we perceive a piece of very dense music, made of sound blocks sometimes very compact, which however marries the evolutions of the instrumental parts. We therefore always hear implicitly what instruments play in the discourse. The great variability of this music, inharmonic and untempered, includes that of ‘tempered’ instruments like a trace in a sound material in deflagrations.

    This process runs throughout the fifth part which reintroduces the generative sound grammars from the beginning. This section ends with a small passacaille followed by ten variations whose motif comes from one of my compositions Passacaille for Tokyo for piano and ensemble.

    The sixth section ends this great development by introducing an additional voice. A cloud of pizzicati in perpetual motion (based on the probabilistic principle of Markovian paths) will deploy on the heights which constitute the inharmonic sounds derived from what the instruments play. Thus a whole series of musical strata arises from the string quartet by successive deductions. It is a distant avatar of Rameau’s old theory from which the harmony was deduced – and from there, the melodic movements which obeyed it – from the principle of natural resonance. Here, it is the instruments that generate ‘inharmonies’ which, in turn, generate melodic movements.

    For the seventh section, I used the principle of ‘spinning tops’ that I had used in my opera K... and, more recently, in Partita I for viola solo and electronics. However, I refined it considerably. The instruments project sounds that rotate at a speed corresponding to the intensity of the instrumental sounds. But when they stabilise, the rotations of these tops will be in harmonic relationship with each other. Thus two sounds of the same height will rotate at the same speed and merge into one another, while two sounds of different heights will rotate at ‘harmonic’ speeds corresponding to their interval relationship.

    The eighth and last section is devoted to the first violin. It behaves like a magician who juggles with different elements that we have heard throughout the work and will spin a spinning top, very high in space, very far from him. The stretched rope has become an invisible thread which, through this distance, will connect the musician on earth to a sound being who will communicate with him. A ‘tensio’ will always be at work.

    First of all, I would like to thank Gilbert Nouno, who assisted me in the composition of this quartet and who developed all the programmes that bring these diverse experiments to life. My thanks also go to Arshia Cont, whose research has made it possible to take a big step in the meeting of acoustic and electronic music, to Matthias Demoucron for his program of synthesis by physical model, to Nicola Montecchio for his participation in the research phase from sheet music monitoring, to Miller Puckette for the invention of the 3F synthesis system, as well as to members of Quatuor Diotima who lent their support to all these experiments.

    Tensio is dedicated to my friends Francoise and Jean-Philippe Billarant in tribute to their obstinacy in remaining among the rare private patrons helping musical creation.

    P. M.


    This second video also has a performance of Harvey's 4th SQ. From the comments:

    "Recorded in B-format Ambisonics with a Soundfield ST-450 microphone. This video is rendered with Binaural audio. To hear best the 3D-spatialisation of the sound, we recommend that you listen with closed-back headphones."

    Last edited by calvinpv; May-29-2021 at 17:05.

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    Carola BauckholtZugvögel (2011-2012)





    for Oboe, Clarinet, Alto Sax, Bass Clarinet, and Bassoon

    Performed by Calefax Reed Quintet

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    Andrew Norman - The Companion Guide to Rome (I-VIII)



    ... for violin, viola and cello

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    Hefang Ma — Nishang


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    Georg Friedrich Haas: Solstices (2019)


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    James Wilding | Melencolia for horn, tuba, and piano (2013)



    Note from composer website:

    ​I saw a reproduction of Dürer's etching Melencolia I (1514) in the Scottish National Gallery, and was fascinated by the magic square, adding up to thirty-four in any direction. The more I thought about this allegorical work, the more aspects of it I felt would suit a musical composition. At that time my wife, the pianist Caroline Oltmanns, together with colleagues Stacie Mickens (horn) and Brian Kiser (tuba), were requesting a piece, and I felt that my piano style would combine well with the mid to low brass instruments to bring out the depth and mystery of the art-work. So I wrote the trio Melencolia (2013), scored for horn, tuba, piano, and cowbell (played by the tubist).

    My composition opens with a long, brooding melody that depicts our modern-day understanding of the title as "depression." But for Dürer, the word had a much broader meaning, perhaps more like "creativity" and so the mood changes into something more restless at (1:45), and grows in triumph (2:23), before returning to the opening atmosphere (2:48). The ringing of a bell (3:16) draws our attention to the etching itself, as if an invisible hand had pulled the rope of Dürer's bell. A musical realization of the magic square begins (3:20) with groups of chords in the piano, where the number of chords in each group corresponds to the numbers in the square, read left to right, top to bottom. The chord groups are separated by short interjections, and longer duets take place at the end of each row of Dürer's numbers, satisfying the rule that each row should add up to thirty-four. The opening returns (6:42) and our thoughts return to the complexity of the concept of melancholy. A change of pace (8:14) depicts another detail in the etching: the winged child dreams of flying and using his useless wheel. Once this ecstatic dream has died away, the opening brooding melody returns (10:37). It leads again to the restless section (12:14), and then the most triumph of outbursts (13:28), Dürer's comet perhaps, in full glory. A mood of resignation takes over (13:48), and we are left to contemplate the play of light on the polyhedron (14:31), with the bell tolling from time to time, and the hourglass gradually running out.

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    Creations by Juilliard composition students - Ensemble intercontemporain



    0:00 Début de la vidéo
    0:12 Présentation du concert par Matthias Pintscher
    3:15 Ivan Enrique Rodriguez : "The Broken Contract", pour harpe et enregistrement
    9:45 Cem Güven : "Whispers to Scream", pour violon, clarinette, cor et clarinette basse
    17:05 Katie Jenkins : "Monologue", pour clarinette solo
    23:25 Corey Chang : "Solitude", pour clarinette, violon et harpe
    28:42 Hannah Ishizaki : "Distant Bells", pour harpe et cor
    33:50 Marc Migó : "The Hum", pour deux clarinettes et deux trompettes
    41:40 Matthew Schultheis : "An Open Room in Fenway Court", pour cor

    Martin Adámek, Jérôme Comte, clarinettes / Jens McManama, cor / Lucas Lipari-Mayer, Clément Saunier, trompettes / Valeria Kafelnikov, harpe / Jeanne-Marie Conquer, violon

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    Andreas Dohmen: Tmesis/Protokoll (2014)


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    Liza Lim: Ronda – The Spinning World
    for 9 musicians (2016)



    Ensemble Modern
    Vimbayi Kaziboni, conductor

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    Senior Member Kjetil Heggelund's Avatar
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    Max! From 2014.
    Last edited by Kjetil Heggelund; Aug-01-2021 at 16:26.

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    Shifting Ground by Elijah Daniel Smith (2020)
    erformed by Sandbox Percussion



    https://sandboxpercussion.com/
    https://www.elijahdanielsmith.com/

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