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Thread: The Contemporary String Quartet: works written since 1970

  1. #61
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    Kory Reeder: Don't Just Sit There and Pretend Everything's Fine (2017) for string quartet

    https://soundcloud.com/kory-reeder-m...erythings-fine

    "I have recently taken an interest in creating literal, proportional, translations of visual art into musical mediums. For Don’t Just Sit There and Pretend Everything’s Fine, I was interested in mathematical and rhythmic proportions found in the linear styles of the High Renaissance, in particular, Raphael’s Ansidei Madonna. Although this piece is not about the painting, I looked back to the church music of the same period as a referential similarity to the visual style. Additionally, I found the time-ridden decay of these near-ancient arts an interesting element in their structures (although these were never intended). To reconcile these ideas, I initially began this piece by writing my own chant-style music using modern set collections then stripped them down to their component parts and pushed them into the background as faded tapestries." - Kory Reeder

    I really liked Reeder's music so I have been collecting recordings of his works. Here is his bandcamp page.
    https://koryreeder.bandcamp.com/music

  2. #62
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    Onutė Narbutaitė: SQ no. 2 (1980; Vilnius String Quartet)
    [info – 1: ??; 3: 1991; 4: 2004; [5??] „just strings and a light wind above them“: 2017; in my collection nos. 2 and 3]


    Paweł Szymański: Four Pieces for String Quartet (2013: Neo Quartet)
    [info – [1??]: 1975; Two Pieces for String Quartet: 1982; Five Pieces for String Quartet 1992; Fotografia z przyjęcia urodzinowego: 1998; in my collection: Two Pieces, Four Pieces, Five Pieces by Royal String Quartet]

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  4. #63
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Lerdahl - String Quartet No. 2 (1982–2010)
    Daedalus Quartet

    Alfred Whitford (Fred) Lerdahl (born March 10, 1943, in Madison, Wisconsin) is the Fritz Reiner Professor of Musical Composition at Columbia University, and a composer and music theorist best known for his work on musical grammar and cognition, rhythmic theory, pitch space, and cognitive constraints on compositional systems. He has written many orchestral and chamber works, three of which were finalists for the Pulitzer Prize for Music: Time after Time in 2001, String Quartet No. 3 in 2010, and Arches in 2011.

    Lerdahl's influences include the German classics, Sibelius, Schoenberg, Bartók, Stravinsky, Carter, Messiaen, and Ligeti. Lerdahl has said he “always sought musical forms of [his] own invention,” and to discover the appropriate form for the intended expression. Writing in Fanfare, Robert Carl noted: "Lerdahl is a profoundly musical composer, engaged in all his work in a rigorous and respectful dialogue with tradition, eager to imbue his pieces with the maximum of both information and clarity." Of Lerdahl's composition Waves, Phillip Scott wrote, "Waves is an orchestral scherzo. It conjures up (rather than depicts) the motion and the sense of waves, not merely of the oceanic variety but also those found on graphs: sound waves, heartbeats, and so on. It begins with a surge of activity and never lets up in its cascading scales and rapid figuration. Unlike Debussy's La mer, whose deep-sea swells it recalls only fleetingly, it has no moments of repose." (Wikipedia)



    Fred Lerdahl: Quartet no. 3 (2008)
    performed by the Daedalus Quartet
    Last edited by SanAntone; Oct-11-2020 at 02:04.

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  6. #64
    Senior Member Lilijana's Avatar
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    I love these two



    Last edited by Lilijana; Oct-11-2020 at 03:42.

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  8. #65
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    Great thread!

    I propose:

    Per Nørgård's Tintinnabulary

    and
    Tōru Takemitsu's A Way a lone

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  10. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lilijana View Post
    I love these two



    Very enjoyable, expressive and rather beautiful, delicate, poised, at least the second, I haven’t had time to explore the first.

    It is a really clear example of something I believe: that expanding the use of conventional instruments beyond standard conservatory techniques is only to the good, the result can be an enhancement of expressive possibilities.
    Last edited by Mandryka; Oct-11-2020 at 14:09.

  11. #67
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Yeah, I also like Turgut Erçetin's string quartets, I know I've listened to them recently, and had thought I had already posted one - but maybe it was in the 21st Century Chamber Music thread. He is one of the composers I interviewed back in 2014.

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  13. #68
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    Jaques Hétu: SQ no. 2 (1991; New Orford String Quartet)
    [info – 1: 1972]
    first movement:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RVr9xKvxIyU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ANnFtGVS0I

    Konstantia Gourzi: SQ no. 2 (2007; Signum Quartet)
    [info – 1: 2004; in my collection nos. 1 and 2 by Ensemble Coriolis]

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  15. #69
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Yifan Guo — Wanderer in May, for string quartet (2018)

    Performed by Yue Qian, Ji Soo Choi, Jiawei Yan, Issei Herr

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    The work starts out very loud and very dissonant, but soon becomes more dynamically and polyphonically varied.

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    Rihm: String Quartet No. 12 (2000-2001)

    Another example of Rihm's "overpainting". Almost the entire second half of the quartet is the opening couple minutes of Jagden und Formen (which was a duet) + new accompaniment for the viola/cello. There is also the entirety of Fetzen 1, about a third of the way through. And according to an Amazon review, there are fragments from Concerto "Dithyramb" as well (not yet familiar with that work, so can't say where they are). The melody in the opening couple of bars, made up of rising fifths, also serves as the "gestalt" (in Rihm's terminology) for Verwandlung 1 and 6, which Rihm would compose later on. Finally, a piano would get added to it a couple of years later to get the work Interscriptum. This string quartet, in other words, is like a central node in a giant network of revisions, insertions and deletions towards some unspecified final form of music, never to be realized.

    Two recordings: Arditti Quartet and Minguet Quartet.





    Last edited by calvinpv; Oct-12-2020 at 04:28.

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    George Perle: SQ no. 8 (1988; Daedalus Quartet)
    [info – [1??] “Molto Adagio”: 1938; ... 7: 1973; 9: 1998; in my collection “Molto Adagio” and nos. 2, 5 and 8 with Daedalus Quartet]


    Jesús Rueda: SQ no. 2 (2003; KNM Quartet)
    [info – 1: 1990; 3: 2004]
    first movement:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zn1xslsdFJo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P6NHGWI5XCE

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  20. #72
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    George Perle is a very interesting composer. He devised his own form of 12-note composition and wrote a book all about it.

    Jesús Rueda is a new name to me.

    Thanks for posting these.
    Last edited by SanAntone; Oct-12-2020 at 13:57.

  21. #73
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    Too many to keep up with but I like Norgard No.10, Schnittke No.3, and Dutilleux. I have the Gubaidulina's on Supraphon but I haven't decided whether I like them or not.
    In Mahler I usually prefer the Solti approach -caveman having a seisure whips orchestra into a frenzy!! - Radames, TC member

  22. #74
    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Enno Poppe: Freizeit (2016)
    Kuss Quartett

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