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Thread: Which music genre is closest to classical?

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    Default Which music genre is closest to classical?

    I'm a bit close minded with my music - only really listen to classical. But which genre would you say is the most similar and can reach similar levels of enjoyment with?

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    Quote Originally Posted by BenG View Post
    I'm a bit close minded with my music - only really listen to classical. But which genre would you say is the most similar and can reach similar levels of enjoyment with?
    Progressive rock.

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    Senior Member Dan Ante's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BenG View Post
    I'm a bit close minded with my music - only really listen to classical. But which genre would you say is the most similar and can reach similar levels of enjoyment with?
    Folk...........................
    "Understeer is when you hit the wall with the front of the car, oversteer is when you hit the wall with the rear of the car.

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    Film music, for sure.

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    Senior Member Azol's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by janxharris View Post
    Progressive rock.
    I'll elaborate: progressive rock (especially sympho prog) posseses many facets of classical music: long suites with recurring themes, lots of exciting tonal, timbral and rhythmic changes, complex polyphonic vocal arrangements. Listening to such a piece requires some concentration and brings enjoyment on many different levels, leaving a very good "aftertaste".
    Last edited by Azol; Oct-25-2020 at 11:06.

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    Jazz lads and lasses

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    Quote Originally Posted by Azol View Post
    I'll elaborate: progressive rock (especially sympho prog) posseses many facets of classical music: long suites with recurring themes, lots of exciting tonal, timbral and rhythmic changes, complex polyphonic vocal arrangements. Listening to such a piece requires some concentration and brings enjoyment on many different levels, leaving a very good "aftertaste".
    Can you give an example of a performance that demonstrates this (a YT link would suffice)
    "Understeer is when you hit the wall with the front of the car, oversteer is when you hit the wall with the rear of the car.

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    Senior Member JAS's Avatar
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    If it is sufficiently similar, it is classical. With that assumption in mind, I cannot think of anything that fits the question posed in the OP.
    Last edited by JAS; Oct-25-2020 at 13:43.

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    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cristian Lee View Post
    Film music, for sure.
    Classical in its superficial surface. Limited in scope, derivative of mediocre classical composers.

    Quote Originally Posted by Azol View Post
    I'll elaborate: progressive rock (especially sympho prog) posseses many facets of classical music: long suites with recurring themes, lots of exciting tonal, timbral and rhythmic changes, complex polyphonic vocal arrangements. Listening to such a piece requires some concentration and brings enjoyment on many different levels, leaving a very good "aftertaste".
    Classical in an attempt at complexity, but ultimately, a trite adolescent form of expression.

    Quote Originally Posted by Fabulin View Post
    Jazz lads and lasses
    Nothing much to do with European classical music. Two very different traditions.

    I agree with this:

    If it is sufficiently similar, it is classical. With that assumption in mind, I cannot think of anything that fits the question posed in the OP.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Cristian Lee View Post
    Film music, for sure.
    I consider music that is written in a classical style to be classical, without regard for the context of its creation. (Not all film music fits, but much of it does, and most of the film music that I like does.) Whether or not it is good classical music is a matter of opinion.
    Last edited by JAS; Oct-25-2020 at 14:01.

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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Classical in its superficial surface. Limited in scope, derivative of mediocre classical composers. . . .
    I have listened to enough of what you have posted as being classical to read this comment about film music, and simply laugh at the absurdity of this idea as a general statement. (It is clearly self-serving and/or totally uninformed.)
    Last edited by JAS; Oct-25-2020 at 14:12.

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    The Beatles seemed to incorporate a lot of classical elements: the string quartet on Eleanor Rigby and Yesterday; the string section with prominent cellos and brass section on All You Need is Love; the horn solo in Penny Lane (featuring the talented and respected, Alan Civil); the full orchestra on A Day in the Life and Goodnight; the use of John Cage's "chance" operations on I am the Walrus (again with prominent cellos); and the avant-garde "musical collage" influence on Revolution 9. For all the Beatles' use of electronic elements, there were classical composers such as Varese, Davidovsky, and others, already delving into electronics in music starting in the early 1950s.

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    Senior Member SanAntone's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JAS View Post
    I have listened to enough of what you have posted as being classical to read this comment about film music, and simply laugh at the absurdity of this idea as a general statement. (It is clearly self-serving and/or totally uninformed.)
    Okay. I fail to see any validity in your attack on me personally as a refutation of what I wrote about film music vis a vis classical music. Maybe you consider John Williams equal to Gustav Holst (a mediocre classical composer), or some other film composer writing music of the caliber of Shostakovich (an excellent classical composer) but I see Williams and the others merely creating pastiches of classical composers as their style is useful for film work.

    If someone who likes classical music can be satisfied with that kind of thing - well, then of course, recommend away.

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    Senior Member Flamme's Avatar
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    The NEO classical.
    'Listen, Mister god!
    Isn't it boring
    to dip your puffy eyes,
    every day, into a jelly of clouds?'

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    Quote Originally Posted by SanAntone View Post
    Okay. I fail to see any validity in your attack on me personally as a refutation of what I wrote about film music vis a vis classical music. Maybe you consider John Williams equal to Gustav Holst (a mediocre classical composer), or some other film composer writing music of the caliber of Shostakovich (an excellent classical composer) but I see Williams and the others merely creating pastiches of classical composers as their style is useful for film work.

    If someone who likes classical music can be satisfied with that kind of thing - well, then of course, recommend away.
    1. John Williams far surpasses Gustav Holst, that much is obvious to anyone well aquainted with the repertoire of both.

    2. Why do you say jazz is "completely different" from classical?

    3. As for the "mediocre classical composers", you mean the likes of R. Strauss, Prokofiev, Korngold, Elgar, Bartok, or Vaughan Williams?
    Last edited by Fabulin; Oct-25-2020 at 14:58.

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