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Thread: A safe pair of hands

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    Default A safe pair of hands

    Dazzling pianists: powerful, eccentric, perverse, vocal, wayward, geniuses - but who do you listen to when you just want to hear a piece of piano music played accurately at a sensible tempo, as the composer intended, without the rhythm being pulled about, notes changed or other kinds of creative intervention from the pianist. In other words, who would you choose as a safe pair of hands?

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    Vladimir Ashkenazy

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    Interesting question.

    Richard Goode, Murray Perahia.

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    Alfred Brendel, John Lill.

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    Claudio Colombo
    Last edited by Mandryka; Oct-29-2020 at 10:38.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MarkW View Post
    Vladimir Ashkenazy
    This recording certainly

    F8FE3719-1767-4C7E-BA70-3BACC0E452DE.jpeg

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    Senior Member Dan Ante's Avatar
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    There are so many it depends on which composer you have in mind Alfred Brendel never disappoints.
    "Understeer is when you hit the wall with the front of the car, oversteer is when you hit the wall with the rear of the car.

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    Jenő Jandó, perhaps?
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Senior Member Skakner's Avatar
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    Every performance reflects a part of the pianist's musical-artistic philosophy, to a certain extent. That's inevitable. I couldn't give a name for the top of the list but a place near the bottom belongs to the gentleman on the left...
    Last edited by Skakner; Oct-29-2020 at 15:21.

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    Senior Member Varick's Avatar
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    Brendel, Ashkenazy, and Perahia mentioned above are good solid choices. Unless I'm studying a piece that I'm about to learn, I rarely want to hear "technically perfect" performed pieces (Alfred Brendel doing the Beethoven Sonatas is a great example. His playing does NOTHING emotionally to me, but if I want to "study" the piece, he would be one of my first choices). I want to hear music performed that moves me emotionally and deeply. However, If there is one pianist who I believe walks this razor's edge perfectly, I would have to say Sviatoslav Richter.

    V
    Last edited by Varick; Oct-29-2020 at 17:32.
    Nostalgia isn't what it used to be.

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    Senior Member Simplicissimus's Avatar
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    John Browning. He was anything but a show-off. One of my music professors described his playing as "restrained brilliance."

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    Senior Member Joachim Raff's Avatar
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    rauch.jpg

    Georg Wilhelm Rauchenecker String Quartet No. 1 is very rare but you get a chance to listen its quite a delightful piece and rewarding.

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    Senior Member Caryatid's Avatar
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    I'd agree with Murray Perahia and Alfred Brendel. But to be honest there are dozens of young pianists now who can play virtually anything very, very competently. In fact they often show a better technique in difficult passages than more famous names.

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    Senior Member pianozach's Avatar
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    Claudio Arrau

    Arthur Rubenstein

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    I lack the the knowledge to contribute anything meaningful to this discussion, but I just want to say I love the title of this thread. I ran through several ideas on what it could mean or be about without landing on the correct interpretation.

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