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Thread: Great Cinematographers

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Phil loves classical View Post
    John Alcott is at or near the top for me. Barry Lyndon is amazing! All shot in natural light. Love the nature scenes, where they look like 18th century paintings. He also did 2001 and Clockwork Orange with Kubrick.

    Attachment 146622
    That is actually a very good film, though I'm doubtful that Ryan O'Neal was the best person for the part!!

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  3. #32
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    This is very interesting about the cinematography for "Barry Lyndon".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOLZMr52Wcc

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  5. #33
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    I just found this as a complement to the thread here on 'great cinematographers'. It's about shot composition and narrative.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CvLQJReDhic

  6. #34
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    Quote Originally Posted by Christabel View Post
    Tati did not do his own cinematography.
    Yes, Jean Badal and Andréas Winding are listed as cinematographers in "Playtime"(that I find one of the greatest films ever). But looking at their other work that is rather mediocre if not outright bad I am pretty sure Tati is the one who designed and directed every detail from light to frame composition in his film.

  7. #35
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    Quote Originally Posted by erki View Post
    Yes, Jean Badal and Andréas Winding are listed as cinematographers in "Playtime"(that I find one of the greatest films ever). But looking at their other work that is rather mediocre if not outright bad I am pretty sure Tati is the one who designed and directed every detail from light to frame composition in his film.
    Well, you obviously know more about this than I do. Same with Hitchcock and his pre-production storyboarding, I guess. There is the little matter of lighting, of course, which Robert Burks did well for Hitchcock.
    Last edited by Christabel; Nov-29-2020 at 00:47.

  8. #36
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    Joseph ("Joe") MacDonald. He photographed many very good films. Here is one from 1958, "The Young Lions", which is a WW2 drama. Here is a scene, beautifully lit and shot in black and white, with two gorgeous male stars - Marlon Brando and Max Schell: the widescreen works well in this particular sequence - which is very disturbing indeed.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8l4aeB5q5U

    Here is Joe MacDonald (on the right) on the set of "The Young Lions". He was Mexican by birth.



    One of the most famous films that MacDonald worked on was "My Darling Clementine" for John Ford, 1946. Some of the framing of the characters against the setting are just wonderful. He imbues this film with a real 'noir' look, which is unusual for a western in 1946.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H4vBB2GBaNs

    Here MacDonald photographed in colour for Henry Hathaway on "Niagara", 1953, starring Marilyn Monroe and Joseph Cotton - a colour noir. Though he mainly worked in black and white there were some significant colour films in his oeuvre.

    https://www.dailymotion.com/video/x7ov6vv

    Arguably his most famous film was made for John Ford, "What Price Glory", 1952. It's in colour and the opening scene before the credits is like an expressionist painting as we watch the weary soldiers returning for a break from the trenches: in fact, the war scenes are bathed in that kind of surreal background imagery. This contrasts with the scenes back in the barracks, which come directly from the stage play:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B07NXmZfXT4

    Joe MacDonald had a distinguished career working with many of cinema's best directors, starting from 1935. These included John Huston, Fred Zinnemann, J. Lee Thompson, Michael Anderson, Norman Jewison, Edward Dymtryk, Elia Kazan, Lloyd Bacon, Sam Fuller, Nicholas Ray, "Wild Bill" Wellman.
    Last edited by Christabel; Dec-01-2020 at 11:33.

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