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Thread: I still like CDs!

  1. #61
    Senior Member 13hm13's Avatar
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    Unlike the rock-pop world, remasters of original (vinyl-era) analog recordings are very good for classical.
    But that said, high-rez vinyl rips can achieve better-than-CD sound if you have a decent analog system and skills in ripping LPs, esp. at 24/96 or 24/192k.

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    Senior Member HerbertNorman's Avatar
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    Although I have over 200 CD's , I must admit that I have found a great partner in the primephonic app and streaming service... It's very handy for a classical music lover and the sound quality is very good imo...
    My vinyl collection is quite big too , but I do not use them as much anymore ... there's many I would never want to sell though!

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    Quote Originally Posted by HerbertNorman View Post
    Although I have over 200 CD's , I must admit that I have found a great partner in the primephonic app and streaming service... It's very handy for a classical music lover and the sound quality is very good imo...
    My vinyl collection is quite big too , but I do not use them as much anymore ... there's many I would never want to sell though!
    I have over 28,000 CDs.
    I do not mind high quality downloads. I just finished downloading in hi-res for $13 total a 16 CD set I have toyed with buying for upwards of $90.

    I DO NOT like streaming services for reasons just illustrated on another forum. The user on that forum was unhappy when some music the user like a lot became unavailable because the license for the streaming service to be able to offer that music was discontinued.

    I prefer to create my own private streaming service using music I literally own, either in hard media of downloaded purchases.

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    Senior Member mikeh375's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rmathuln View Post
    I have over 28,000 CDs.................
    oh wow. That's an incredible amount Rmathuln, have you seen the doctor yet, can you get out of the house even....just joking..
    Can anybody on TC beat that?????
    Last edited by mikeh375; Jan-04-2021 at 15:42.

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    Senior Member Gothos's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rmathuln View Post
    I have over 28,000 CD's
    We're not worthy,we're not worthy.
    I have approximately 1500 CD's but I love shopping for more(lockdowns permitting)
    Thank goodness for Ebay.
    Last edited by Gothos; Jan-04-2021 at 15:56.
    "Puritanism:The haunting fear that someone,somewhere,may be happy."

    H.L.Mencken

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  9. #66
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Schuster View Post
    Absolutely, still love my cds. I also love my records and my digital files. They all have their value. Most of my listening tends to be using Bluetooth devices and digital files. When I truly have time to just sit and concentrate on the music, rather than using it as my soundtrack for other activities, I prefer cds or records. Records, in particular, are a commitment to more active listening, due to their limited playing time and inability to skip tracks, without manually moving the needle. I also fully agree that there is a plethora of cheap physical media available now. It is so easy to find old cds and records for ridiculously low prices. I picked up the 8 disc Beethoven complete quartets set by the Cleveland Quartet for 99 cents, not long ago. So, yes, cheers to cds!

    Bravo!, and sometimes the sound is unmatched.


  10. #67
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    I am confused by the discussion just a little bit.

    I like CDs, too, but here's my CD collection (or most of it):

    loft1.jpg

    It's that pile of black & silver boxes, tucked in a messy corner of the loft. Here's one of those boxes up close and personal:

    cds.jpg

    Clearly, I don't do much with those boxed CDs (I'd never be that tidy if they were in daily use!). So what does my functional CD collection look like? Like this:

    Screenshot_20210104_173831.jpg

    The procedure in these parts is (a) buy a CD; (b) rip it to hard disk; (c) tag it correctly; (d) move it into its correct directory. Oh and (e), put CD into plastic envelope, file in the loft and dispose of the jewel case in the recyling bin, usually with gusto. (Actually, these days, I find most recordings are available as FLAC digital downloads, which saves me steps (a) and (e). But I digress...)

    Hence my confusion. If we're using "I still like CDs" to mean "I still like owning music in packages chosen by record companies and with attractive booklets to read, rather than merely streaming a random assortment of 'tracks' that I don't actually own", then I'm definitely in the "I still love CDs" camp. I have used streaming services to hunt down something I'd be interested in buying, but that's as far as I ever go with them.

    But nothing on Earth would induce me ever to attempt to play a physical CD in an actual CD Player these days! I couldn't afford the bookshelves to house them all in a way that would make them practically usable for starters. Plus, dusting. Plus, I hate jewel cases. Plus, clumsy. Plus, faff... No: give me the CDs without the actual CD, really!

    I will agree in passing that having your music on a hard disk can teach bad habits: you get used to picking individual movements, because every digital media player out there organises things by 'albums' and 'tracks-within-albums', so the slow movement all on its own is just a mouse-click or screen-tap away. They all come with pause buttons, too, which encourages a stop-start-and-be-distracted-away approach to listening, which isn't really ideal for classical music, I think.

    But I've managed to get those aspects of things under control by playing my digital music in a player that doesn't display tracks, but only whole compositions. And it (deliberately!) lacks a pause button: you listen to all four movements of the symphony, or stop it and have to start it again from the beginning. You don't get to say you listened to Symphony No. 9 if you listened to it fitfully over three days (Of course, I can cheat if I really want to: using the file manager and a right-click, I can play any individual track I fancy to play, when the mood strikes. But I try not to cheat these days!).

    I guess my point is that I can definitely understand people who don't warm to streaming digital music they don't own. And I can also understand those who find the owned-digital-music approach not as conducive to focusing on the music content as the old manual 'ritual' of extracting a CD from its case and putting it in the player... but there are always software ways around that sort of thing! And though I listen to nothing that hasn't come from a CD these days, I'll never physically play a CD again.

  11. #68
    Senior Member julide's Avatar
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    I still like cross dressers too.

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    Senior Member NoCoPilot's Avatar
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    When I told my wife I was invested in CDs for my retirement, she thought I meant certificates of deposit.

    I must admit to being absolutely baffled by listeners like AbsolutelyBaching above who file the disc and throw away the jewel case and paper covers. To me, reading the liner notes, admiring the artwork, checking the performers, checking recording dates & venues, and even seeing the spine in the rack and realizing, "hey it's been a while since I played that" -- all are a part, a big part of the experience of playing music.

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  14. #70
    Senior Member NoCoPilot's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mikeh375 View Post
    Can anybody on TC beat that?????
    It's been a long time since I counted my collection, but I have 288' of shelving, and about 30 CDs lined up make a foot. So no, I'm nowhere close.
    Last edited by NoCoPilot; Jan-04-2021 at 19:37.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NoCoPilot View Post
    When I told my wife I was invested in CDs for my retirement, she thought I meant certificates of deposit.

    I must admit to being absolutely baffled by listeners like AbsolutelyBaching above who file the disc and throw away the jewel case and paper covers. To me, reading the liner notes, admiring the artwork, checking the performers, checking recording dates & venues, and even seeing the spine in the rack and realizing, "hey it's been a while since I played that" -- all are a part, a big part of the experience of playing music.
    Ah, but we have things called scanners. Booklets can be scanned and turned into PDFs.
    And I embed all the supplied or scanned artwork inside my digital music files, so I lose none of it:

    artwork.png

    I've bumped the file preview thumbnail size up so you can see it, but that's showing you the FLAC files which make up my recording of Britten's A Midsummer Night's Deam... and every single file has a nice graphic showing for it, so you know just at a glance what opera it belongs to.

    I am never without some graphical reminder of where my music came from. And the good thing about my approach is: I don't have to live with the shonky artwork re-releases often come with. I can tag my music with whatever artwork I find most agreeable. In the case of that Midsummer Night's Dream CD, for example, I preferred to use the purple and text-heavy image that adorned the original LP boxed set when I first bought it, rather than the black-and-white photo of Benjamin Britten that was devoid of all useful information that my CDs were actually supplied in. So whereas physical-CDers gets to put up with whatever the record companies foist on them at the time of purchase, I get to use the most attractive artwork the record companies have ever supplied in the past, assuming it is available somewhere on the Internet.

    Liner notes, performers, recording dates and venues: all available in a PDF, produced at the time of ripping (or more often supplied at the time of purchase these days). And my ink won't fade with time!

    And I don't have to trust to fallible memory as to whether or not I've played a piece in a while: Last.fm records everything I play, so I can check my records there.

    I can assure you that I miss out nothing of the 'playing music experience', artwork and liner notes included.

    In fact, because everything it is digital, I can do things you can't: such as have my music player make a random selection of something to play for me, when I can't decide on something for myself. Or keep accurate tabs on who I'm over- or under-playing, so that I can make sure my listening experiences are as broad and varied as possible and that no part of my collection falls into disuse by oversight or accident.

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  17. #72
    Senior Member NoCoPilot's Avatar
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    Methinks that level of detail would be easier to enter and deal with in a collection of a few hundred CDs.

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    Quote Originally Posted by NoCoPilot View Post
    Methinks that level of detail would be easier to enter and deal with in a collection of a few hundred CDs.
    Not sure who you were directing that at, or the context. But assuming it was me, I can rip and tag a 4 CD boxed set in less than 25 minutes, including all performer details and track titles in any of English, Italian, German or French (and I can't touch-type). Czech slows me down, though! And yes, English is a tad faster, though not hugely. Scanning a booklet would be more of an effort, which is why I will often try and find them or the CD's artwork on the Internet rather than construct them myself. But back in the day, I scanned the entire Solti Götterdämmerung booklet in about 30 minutes.

    So it's an effort, but it's not a huge one. Obviously, I'd loathe having to do it all again from scratch. But doing it in batches as new acquisitions get processed... not a trauma.

    Obviously, I don't know how many CDs I actually own these days!

    But I can tell you I have 10,564 individual compositions written by 469 unique composers (that's in my main collection; I don't yet have those stats from the overflow, which I've only just started creating, so is fairly small).

    The total playing time for the main collection is:

    collectionstats01.png

    ...which is 277,712 minutes play-time. Assume an average length of a CD is 70 minutes: that's 3,967 CDs-worth.

    For the overflow, I've got a further:

    collectionstats02.png

    ...which is 14,385 minutes or another 205 CDs, give or take. So, say it's 4,200 CDs, roughly.

    For fun and giggles, I discovered that the 'standard' width of a CD Jewel Case is apparently 10mm. So, 4,200 CDs would take up 42,000mm or 42m, or 126 feet or so. Which means I'm slightly under half your size, I think.
    Last edited by Guest002; Jan-04-2021 at 22:03.

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    Senior Member SONNET CLV's Avatar
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    Haven't counted my CDs lately, but there are a few.

    For counting purposes: 50 CDs with standard sized jewel cases will fill 20 inches of shelf space.

    I calculated three of my filled shelves at 1690 inches. Divided by 20 that's 84.5. Multiply 84.5 by 50 and get 4225.

    4225 CDs. That's about a third of my CD collection.

    Still, that calculation counts the single CD in a single jewel case. Many of the shelved items are multiple set boxes. A standard single-size jewel case can hold 2, 3, or 4 CDs. "Fat Box" jewel cases and hardboard Box Sets often have more.

    20 inches of Box Set can hold 200 discs in paper sleeves. I measured four Beethoven boxes I have, which came to 40 inches and housed a total of 396 discs, including booklet documentation.

    Since I have a couple dozen box sets, including several large sets, on the same shelving mentioned above, the CD count will expand greatly. Possibly even doubling the disc count, which would be 8450 on that 1690 inches of shelving.

    I have no intentions of counting every disc on shelves or in storage boxes or other locations in the house. But there are quite a few. Not a good situation to be in if you have to move, which I did recently, thus many discs still in storage boxes.

    And I haven't even mentioned the LPs.

    What does all this mean (other than to reveal a measure of my lack of sanity)? One point to be made is that I have little need for streaming devices, as I have enough music, all of my own choosing, to last a lifetime (or several). Can I ever hear all of these even once through again? Likely not (though I would hope to be able to). And they take up space. But I can't imagine sitting in my listening room staring at blank walls while listening to internet streamed music. I see my Beethoven bust sitting atop one of my CD shelves. He is wearing a pair of my Sennheiser headphones, and he looks quite content. I'm sitting in my listening chair with the other set of Sennheiser's on my head. I don't have a mirror handy, but I suspect I also look quite content.

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  21. #75
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrosseFugue View Post
    Despite all the options -- streaming, downloads, YouTube, etc. -- I still like to listen to CDs.
    Same here. And I hope that whatever may replace them sometime in the future is as convenient, user-friendly, portable, informative, and advantageous in so many other ways as CDs.

    This discussion comes at a time when I have at long last commenced converting my most favorite and precious LPs to audio CDs. Compared to LPs, CDs have the huge advantage of not contributing more damage to the recording with every use, and of being immensely more portable because of their smaller size. Plus of course other conveniences such as not having to flip the record in the middle of a symphony, etc.

    The jewel box with liner notes are a major advantage of this kind of record medium. Definitely works for me. Yes, I could digitize the LPs to a hard disk, but seems to me the equivalent of liner notes, indicating tracks/times, etc., would be a lot more cumbersome if I had to access and read them with a laptop or PC monitor.

    If recording companies would switch to a totally "solid-state" medium, would they expect everyone to be downloading symphonies sort of like Apple Tunes? Would the marketing environment support the profitability of anything like this?

    Alternatively, would they package recordings into something like an SD card or flashdrive?

    I don't know where the technology is heading, but I hope it comes up with something that maintains the advantages of CDs.

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