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Thread: I still like CDs!

  1. #106
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    When I start to listen I don't know what I want. To look at the stack of CDs is much easier than to the screen - and there isn't anything to do with organising. Just the files on the screen(even with pictures) have much less call for me.
    Sometimes there is a cover I want to look at and touch so I choose to listen it as well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by erki View Post
    When I start to listen I don't know what I want. To look at the stack of CDs is much easier than to the screen - and there isn't anything to do with organising. Just the files on the screen(even with pictures) have much less call for me.
    Sometimes there is a cover I want to look at and touch so I choose to listen it as well.
    Sorry to keep picking you up on little details, but if you have a CD collection, you either organise it or you don't. There is then just as much organising involved with a set of files on a hard disk: no more, no less. It's simply not the case that a CD collection requires less (or more) organisation than an equivalent digital files, though it does require more dusting.

    As I say: you keep doing you, and if that means being happy listening to CDs, that's great and no criticism intended or implied. But I would want you to be making your choices with full information, not myths or misunderstandings!

    Incidentally, if you don't know what you want to listen to when you start listening (something I definitely share with you), then you might do worse than pick your plays at random... and my own AMP player will do random selections for you at a drop of the hat (but cannot fetch random physical CDs off your shelves for you!). Costs nothing, but does require you to run Linux at the moment, I'm afraid (which you should do anyway, for all sorts of other reasons, which I won't bore you with now!)
    Last edited by Guest002; Jan-10-2021 at 11:26.

  3. #108
    Senior Member Taplow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbsolutelyBaching View Post
    Incidentally, if you don't know what you want to listen to when you start listening (something I definitely share with you), then you might do worse than pick your plays at random... and my own AMP player will do random selections for you at a drop of the hat (but cannot fetch random physical CDs off your shelves for you!).
    I recently exported my iTunes library (41,822 tracks of CM) as an XML file and wrote a script to import it into a database for viewing online. Don't ask me why! You've now given me an idea to write a 'randomizer' to provide random listening suggestions, perhaps based on certain criteria (composer, genre, artist, label, you name it). What fun!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Taplow View Post
    I recently exported my iTunes library (41,822 tracks of CM) as an XML file and wrote a script to import it into a database for viewing online. Don't ask me why! You've now given me an idea to write a 'randomizer' to provide random listening suggestions, perhaps based on certain criteria (composer, genre, artist, label, you name it). What fun!
    I've found a randomizing player (that is, something that randomizes which album it will play, but doesn't scramble the order of the tracks once it's chosen something to play), to be a really "good thing"! I'm listening to recordings I haven't heard in over a decade; to composers I didn't really even know I had in the collection. I think it a great way to stop listening to the old war horses over and over again!

    I'd only want to point out (1) make sure the size of your collection's components don't affect the randomizer (i.e., if there are 4000 Bach 'tracks' and 3 Bridge ones, you nevertheless want Bach and Bridge to be equally likely to be selected for play, I think). And (2) allow your player to not randomize when the mood takes you: if you're in sombre mood, you really don't want it to pick a comic opera at random (or maybe you do, who knows!). You definitely need a manual over-ride, anyway.

    Incidentally, since Apple is Unixy under the hood -maybe my AMP player will work on it mostly unaltered? Would be handy to know, to be honest, one way or another!

    I plan to add the ability to specify a genre or a performer in a future release. Not label though: I never store that data in the first place, so I have no need for that.
    Last edited by Guest002; Jan-10-2021 at 14:47.

  5. #110
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    Quote Originally Posted by GrosseFugue View Post
    Despite all the options -- streaming, downloads, YouTube, etc. -- I still like to listen to CDs. There's something about putting a disc in the player that promotes close listening, gives me that old timey feeling of dropping a needle on the album. You made the effort, now you make the time. Plus you get to hold a booklet.

    The welter of digital options seem to almost promote ADD-style listening. I've even shuffled tracks of Beethoven's late string quartets (yes, I know, sacrilegious!) on my phone. There are like tens of thousands (more?) of albums available to me via Primephonic (great site, btw), but sometimes it can feel like being in a library and trying to skim through every book vs. just taking one home with you. I realize it's a state of mind. But wondered if other listeners still liked their CDs (or LPs). In fact, I think part of why LPs are popular again is the pleasure of holding and using a big tangible item (plus you get all the cool artwork, etc).
    Fully agree! CD is my favourite medium for classical music, as well as SACD (not so much for the superior quality, but for the surround sound, which I like very much when it has been done properly). I rip all (newly purchased) classical CDs/SACDs in my iTunes library too, so I can listen to them whilst travelling (i.e. after this covid pandemic of course) on my iPhone with decent headphones.

    I listen to pop music on vinyl and CD too, but classical is CD/SACD only when it comes to physical media.
    Last edited by Oakey; Jan-10-2021 at 15:54.

  6. #111
    Senior Member Azol's Avatar
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    If you enjoy re-reading this whole discussion at your leisure then you are definitely a CD freak
    My case exactly.
    I also rip the CDs to my hard disk (then to network storage then to offsite backup HDD).
    Sometimes it's easier to find something in a digital-only way and for this I am cataloging all my CDs/DVDs/Blu-rays using CATraxx application.
    But still, nothing better than to hold a physical product! So now I am upgrading my Blu-ray player then a bit later both CD player and an amplifier.

  7. #112
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azol View Post
    If you enjoy re-reading this whole discussion at your leisure then you are definitely a CD freak
    My case exactly.
    I also rip the CDs to my hard disk (then to network storage then to offsite backup HDD).
    Sometimes it's easier to find something in a digital-only way and for this I am cataloging all my CDs/DVDs/Blu-rays using CATraxx application.
    But still, nothing better than to hold a physical product! So now I am upgrading my Blu-ray player then a bit later both CD player and an amplifier.
    It is curious. I've tried digital scores of music a bazillion times: can't be doing with them, really: "Nothing better than to hold a physical product!". I like the feel of paper in my hand, and although PDF scores work and work well, they're just not the same. Don't know why, can't explain.

    I assume that's the same as what's happening with you and CDs, except with CDs, I'd be happy never to see one again. Odd, isn't it, how we'll each happily accept digital in one realm and not be so keen on it in another. I wonder what's going on there?!

  8. #113
    Senior Member Ich muss Caligari werden's Avatar
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    I love my CD collection, very large,* and though I still have LPs and listen to them not infrequently, I suspect I may reach a point where I will have to bid those adieu. I do not do any digitizing, downloads, rippings, rippings-off, or anything of that ilk. I've neither the time nor the patience and am quite happy to consider myself (or be labeled) unapologetically retardataire.

    *The larger my collection grew the more acutely aware I became of (and annoyed at) what it lacked... Some friends and family, back when there was actual in-person engagement with others of the human race, would look at my collection in bewilderment and wonder how one could ever find the time to listen to it. I, on the other hand, wonder about those folks (there are many!) who own a CD-player and a collection of 10-20 disks; how can they possibly limit themselves to so few? Those folks are of great socio-cultural interest to me, actually - I believe they have a CD-player NOT to listen to music, per se, but to simply own the technology. There were loads of people in Victrola days who, similarly, would go to the expense of buying a record player and yet could or would not spare the money for 78s.
    De la musique avant toute chose... Paul Verlaine

  9. #114
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    Quote Originally Posted by MatthewWeflen View Post
    This player is focused on album art, but its capabilities are not sufficient for my needs.

    https://www.engadget.com/tom-vek-sle...090019190.html

    Attachment 148507
    Actually, mine neither. I can see the advantage of a portable device like this – sort of a replacement of a "Walkman" clamshell-style portable CD player, but for some kind of "solid-state" input (internal storage? SD card? USB flashdrive? etc). But the recording format would need to include the equivalent of liner notes, especially the track list (playlist?) showing the compositions, movements, etc. by track.

    Seems to me this would require a standard industry format, both for the audio and the verbal info & graphics. Then to get that, consumers must invest in an appropriate device, hopefully non-proprietary so that multiple suppliers can offer it.

    But how does this help you when you're sitting at home listening to your main sound system? With CDs (and LPs) you have printed liner notes. You can not only find tracks you want, but also you can read something about the pieces. Obviously this can be provided digitally, but it seems it would require some kind of technology, making it more cumbersome and expensive than the back of an LP cover or printed notes or a booklet in a CD case.

    Right now, the CD medium seems to hit all the right bases. Also, from a marketing standpoint, there's something to be said for a tangible medium that can be attractively packaged.

    In a previous post I've noted some drawbacks I see with CD technology. Solid-state clearly has some advantages, but these issues I think need some kind of acceptable resolution. Hopefully coming soon?

  10. #115
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nawdry View Post
    I can see the advantage of a portable device like this – sort of a replacement of a "Walkman" clamshell-style portable CD player, but for some kind of "solid-state" input (internal storage? SD card? USB flashdrive? etc). But the recording format would need to include the equivalent of liner notes, especially the track list (playlist?) showing the compositions, movements, etc. by track.
    I'm interested to know why we ever got suckered into thinking of classical music as "tracks"! If you go to the concert hall, you don't go to listen to four "tracks" of Beethoven's Symphony No. 5. You listen to a single symphony. And sure, it has four movements, but we tend not to walk out in the middle of them for a tea-break! We regard them as parts of an integrated whole when we go somewhere to listen to them. I wonder how we ever got to the place I think we're all in when it's OK to play just one movement from a symphony. Or to play half a symphony and then hit pause, have dinner, and come back and listen to the rest of it after.

    Having just written a media player that deliberately (a) doesn't play or display tracks; (b) has no means of pausing playback; and (c) only records a 'play' when you've played all of something... well, I think there's a lot to be said for not thinking in 'tracks'. I get that when you buy a CD containing both Symphony No. 5 and Symphony No. 8 that you might well not want to listen to both symphonies. So rip them to separate folders and call each folder an 'album'. Tracks are needed for that job. But after that? I'm coming to the view that a composition should definitely not be split up into separate 'tracks' and it was a mistake from the LP days that got carried forward that it ever was.

    Quote Originally Posted by Nawdry View Post
    But how does this help you when you're sitting at home listening to your main sound system? With CDs (and LPs) you have printed liner notes. You can not only find tracks you want, but also you can read something about the pieces. Obviously this can be provided digitally, but it seems it would require some kind of technology, making it more cumbersome and expensive than the back of an LP cover or printed notes or a booklet in a CD case.
    But we all (or most of us) have such a technology in our pockets already. It's called a smartphone. Displays graphics and text perfectly well. I read this forum on it every morning before I get out of bed... and you can "fit" a lot more information "on" it than you can on any LP cover or booklet: the entire Wikipedia is accessible from it, for starters. Compare that to some of the CD "booklets" produced by... Naxos, for example. Sometimes, they don't extend beyond a paragraph on the back cover!

    I don't think most people think of their smartphones as 'cumbersome' (though I will grant you they can be expensive).

    Quote Originally Posted by Nawdry View Post
    Right now, the CD medium seems to hit all the right bases. Also, from a marketing standpoint, there's something to be said for a tangible medium that can be attractively packaged.
    I like your point about attractive marketing. I think it's something I personally overlook a lot, but carries a lot of heft.

    Again, though, I look at Prestoclassical as an example: that site uses all the standard CD cover art to make it attractive etc. Then they often quote Gramophone or BBC reviews, so you can make an informed purchase decision. And then they sell you a FLAC download! There's really no fundamental reason, in other words, that you can't make the marketing side of solid state, non-corporeal music any less attractive or informative than the traditional polycarbonate disk industry has done.
    Last edited by Guest002; Jan-12-2021 at 13:59.

  11. #116
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    Quote Originally Posted by Malx View Post
    The only time I'll get rid of my CDs is when I have no physical space to store them.
    Here's an option for you - Note: This is not my collection - There is no power on either heaven or earth possessing the strength to force me to ever paint anything "sage green" - a particularly hideous color - the stuff of nightmares - dreadful, just dreadful... Anyway...

    I came across this setup on another site - Click on the photo three times to enlarge the image -

    s6cSaEy.jpg

    Here's how he described the installation -

    "Years ago I built simple CD shelves using 6" pine from the hardware store. Slapped then together and painted them. When I moved my collection, I ran out of wall space so took one of the shelves I built and put it on wheels and attached it to a simple bracket setup it to the top of the shelves secured to the wall so it wouldn't fall over. Now I can just slide that one 3 foot second back and forth to access the ones behind. Working well so far!"

    I've always suspected that the number of CD's one possesses is in inverse proportion to the number one has actually listened to...
    Last edited by Sunburst Finish; Jan-12-2021 at 14:59.

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  13. #117
    Senior Member Azol's Avatar
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    I spot Callas boxset right there!
    And no, I haven't noticed anything particular about the color of his shelves!

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    I like the carpets, though!

  15. #119
    Senior Member Helgi's Avatar
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    To me, CDs lend themselves to a different listening experience from listening to pure digital. For example; I've been focusing on the Dvořák symphonies for the past week or so, and picked some recordings from my shelves and put next to my CD player. In the evening, I sit down and listen to a symphony or two and return the next evening to find the same set of recordings.

    I could do the same with digital files, at the computer, on my iPod, on my Phone, streaming through my living room system, whatever; but chances are I get sidetracked by something else instead of focusing on just a few CDs I've picked off the shelves.

    That said, I want to figure out a way to get that sense of focus with the less tangible part of my collection.

  16. #120
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    Quote Originally Posted by AbsolutelyBaching View Post
    I like the carpets, though!
    They're the kind of inexpensive faux-Persian/Oriental rugs that one can buy at big box hardware stores here in the US -

    https://www.homedepot.com/b/Flooring...ection=&Nao=48

    but the S & H would probably be cost prohibitive to the UK so you might want to check out Homebase -

    https://www.homebase.co.uk/our-range...-doormats/rugs

    "Traditional oriental rugs will never go out of style. Currently, they accentuate mid-century modern themes. Dark red Bokhara rugs or Peshawar Ziegler rugs have bold patterns that date back centuries. Ziegler rugs make fantastic runner rugs because their prints can go with almost any other rugs in the home."

    Now that I've pretty much run that tangent into the ground we can continue our discussion...

    I'm leaning towards @absolutelybaching and going "digital" as the very idea of the time, effort, and expense involved in the acquisition of "shelving units" runs the risk of giving me either an aneurysm or an embolism... possibly both.
    Last edited by Sunburst Finish; Jan-12-2021 at 16:15.

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