Page 831 of 1380 FirstFirst ... 3317317818218278288298308318328338348358418819311331 ... LastLast
Results 12,451 to 12,465 of 20691

Thread: Current Listening Vol VII

  1. #12451
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    On the border.
    Posts
    29,244
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default




    Mozart: Piano Trios

    Daniel Barenboim (piano), Michael Barenboim (violin), Kian Soltani (cello)
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  2. Likes Taggart, elgars ghost, D Smith and 4 others liked this post
  3. #12452
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    660
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    The very special touch Bruno Walter brings to Mahler's music. Not to be missed!

    walter mahler 9.jpg

    Regards,

    Vincula

  4. Likes elgars ghost, Rogerx, perempe and 7 others liked this post
  5. #12453
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2021
    Location
    Northamptonshire
    Posts
    200
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Bach - Brandenburg Concerto No.2 in F - New Philharmonia Orchestra, Otto Klemperer

    OTTO KLEMPERER THE MAESTRO.jpg

  6. Likes elgars ghost, D Smith, Malx and 4 others liked this post
  7. #12454
    Member
    Join Date
    May 2020
    Posts
    84
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Coach G View Post
    Over the past few days I've been listening to this Sony box set by maestro Leopold Stokowski (1882-1977):

    Attachment 156979

    DISC 1: Beethoven: Symphony #3 "Eroica"; Coriolan Overture (w/London Philharmonic Orchestra); Brahms: Academic Festival Overture (New Philharmonia Orchestra)
    DISC 2: Shostakovich: Symphony #6; Age of Gold Suite; Khatchaturian: Symphony #3 (Chicago Symphony Orchestra)
    DISC 3: Menotti: Sebastian Suite; Prokofiev: excerpts from Romeo and Juliet (NBC Symphony Orchestra)
    DISC 4: Wagner: Ride of the Valyries from Die Walkure; Prelude to Act III from Tristan und Isolde; Entrance of the Gods into Valhalla from Das Rheingold; Overture and Venusberg Music from Tannhauser (Symphony of the Air w/soloists); Rienzi Overture; Magic Fire Music from Die Walkure (Royal Philharmonic Orchestra)
    DISC 5: Wagner: Prelude, Dance of the Apprentices; and Procession of the Meistersingers from Die Miestersinger von Nurnberg; Prelude and Isolde's Liebestod from Tristan und Isolde (Royal Philharmonic Orchestra); Siegfried's Rhine Journey; Funeral March, and Brunnhilde's Immolation Scene from Gotterdammurung(London Symphony Orchestra)
    DISC 6: Beethoven: The Heavens Are Telling; Traditional: Deep River; Handel: Ombra mai fu from Xerxes; Humperdinck: Evening Prayer from Hansel and Gretel; Bach: Jesu, Joy of Man's Desiring; Rachmaninoff: Vocalise; Traditional: Praise God from Whom All Blessings Flow; Wagner: Pilgrim's Chorus from Tannhauser; Bach: Sheep May Safely Graze; Tchaikovsky: Pater Noster; Gluck: O Saviour, Hear Me from Orfeo et Euridice (New Symphony Orchestra w/the Norman Luboff Choir); Handel: Water Music Suite (RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra)
    DISC 7: Canteloube: Chants d"Auvergne; Villa-Lobos: Bachianas Brasileiras #5; Rachmaninoff: Vocalise (American Symphony Orchesta w/Anna Moffo)
    DISC 8: Dvorak: Symphony #9 "New World" (New Philharmonia Orchestra); Smetana: The Moldau; Bartered Bride Overture (RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra)
    DISC 9: Tchaikovsky: Symphony #6 "Pathetique" (London Symphony Orchestra); Enescu: Romanian Rhapsody #1; Liszt: Hungarian Rhapsody #2 (RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra)
    DISC 10: Rimsky-Korsakov: Scheherazade (Royal Philharmonic Orchestra); Russian Easter Overture (Chicago Symphony Orchestra)
    DISC 11: Bach/Stokowski: Chaconne; Partita; Ein feste Burg ist unser Gott; Air; Fugue; Aroiso; Wachet auf uns die Stimme; Komm Susser Tod (London Symphony Orchestra); Handel: Music for Royal Fireworks (RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra)
    DISC 12 & 13: Brahms: Symphony #4 (New Philharmonia Orchestra); Mahler: Symphony #2 "Resurrection" (London Symphony Orchestra & Chorus w/soloists)

    Having enjoyed one of the longest and most fruitful careers as a world-class conductor, here Leopold Stokowski plays musical chairs with many different orchestras between the years of 1954 and 1975 when he was age 72-93! Despite Stokowski's geriatric disposition, all of these recordings are very fine and sound very fresh. Perhaps Stokowski gets a little schmaltzy here and there especially in the generous portion of Wagner that is featured on discs 4 and 5; but generally the feeling is well-measured with a good sense of flow; and Stokowski shapes the music to fit his own sense of sound that is very rich and full. The repertoire is prolific but focuses mostly on Late Romantic/Early Modern fare with even the Bach and Handel selections being given a thoroughly "Romantic" and un-HIP treatment. In this sense, the Bach/Stokowski transcriptions belong as much to Bach as to Stokowski whose orchestral color does not diminish the spirit of Bach's musical vision. While Stokowski celebrates many of our well-worn warhorses by the likes of Beethoven, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Rimsky, Dvorak, etc; he also covers many composers such as Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Khatchaturian, Menotti, and Villa-Lobos who were his contemporaries. And even in regard to the "warhorses"; the likes of Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Rimsky, and Dvorak were alive during Stokowski's lifetime and weren't that far removed form his own living memory; and I doubt that many conductors today would dedicate as much time and effort to promoting as much new music as Stokowski had done. Of particular interest should be the recording of Mahler's Symphony #2 "Resurrection" where Stokowski who is not especially known as a champion of Mahler brings forth a very good and smooth recording.

    Bugs Bunny as "Leopold":

    Attachment 156980
    A classic B. Bunny performance

  8. #12455
    Senior Member Red Terror's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    1,710
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default


  9. Likes Rogerx, elgars ghost, Malx and 3 others liked this post
  10. #12456
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Worcestershire, England
    Posts
    10,304
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Granville Bantock - various works part three of three after the grocery run. Works are for orchestra unless otherwise specified.


    Prelude to The Song of Songs (1912-26):




    The Second Day (complete), The Third Day (excerpts) and The Fifth Day (duet) for soprano, tenor, baritone and orchestra, from The Song of Songs for soloists, double mixed choir and orchestra [Text: The Song of Solomon] (1912-26):




    Pagan Symphony: 'et ego in Arcadia vixi' (1927):
    Two Heroic Ballads - 1: Cuchullan's Lament 2: Kishmul's Galley, after ancient Irish/Scottish mythology (1944):




    The Cyprian Goddess [Symphony No. 3] (1938-39):




    Celtic Symphony for strings and six harps (1940):

    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

  11. Likes Rogerx, D Smith, perempe and 6 others liked this post
  12. #12457
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    On the border.
    Posts
    29,244
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default






    Villa-Lobos - Chôros Volume 2

    Fabio Zanon (guitar), Dante Yenque, Ozéas Arantes & Samuel Hamzem (horn) & Darrin Coleman Milling (bass trombone), Linda Bustani and Ilan Rechtman (piano)

    São Paulo Symphony Orchestra, John Neschling


    Villa-Lobos: Chôros No. 1 for guitar
    Villa-Lobos: Chôros No. 4 for three horns & trombone
    Villa-Lobos: Chôros No. 6 for orchestra
    Villa-Lobos: Chôros No. 8 for large orchestra & 2 pianos
    Villa-Lobos: Chôros No. 9 for orchestra
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  13. Likes D Smith, Enthusiast, Chilham and 10 others liked this post
  14. #12458
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    10,375
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by elgars ghost View Post
    Granville Bantock - various works part three of three after the grocery run. Works are for orchestra unless otherwise specified.


    Prelude to The Song of Songs (1912-26):




    The Second Day (complete), The Third Day (excerpts) and The Fifth Day (duet) for soprano, tenor, baritone and orchestra, from The Song of Songs for soloists, double mixed choir and orchestra [Text: The Song of Solomon] (1912-26):




    Pagan Symphony: 'et ego in Arcadia vixi' (1927):
    Two Heroic Ballads - 1: Cuchullan's Lament 2: Kishmul's Galley, after ancient Irish/Scottish mythology (1944):




    The Cyprian Goddess [Symphony No. 3] (1938-39):




    Celtic Symphony for strings and six harps (1940):

    I do like Bantock's music but playing nothing but Bantock for days seems almost heroic. How is it working for you?

  15. Likes HenryPenfold, elgars ghost liked this post
  16. #12459
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    10,375
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    This is fun.


  17. Likes HenryPenfold, RockyIII, elgars ghost and 1 others liked this post
  18. #12460
    Senior Member Bourdon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2019
    Location
    The Netherlands
    Posts
    4,268
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Monteverdi

    Not a bad idea to listen to this recording again


  19. Likes HenryPenfold, Malx, Rmathuln and 3 others liked this post
  20. #12461
    Senior Member Chilham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    In my castle
    Posts
    1,655
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by mparta View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Chilham View Post
    This afternoon while catching-up on some chores I should have done in the week:



    Mozart: Le Nozze di Figaro

    Nikolaus Harnoncourt

    Wiener Philharmoniker, Ildebrando D'Arcangelo, Anna Netrebko, Bo Skovhus, Dorothea Röschmann, Christine Schäfer

    I have the DVD of this Figaro. It is very strange, reminiscent of the odd things Harnoncourt used to do with Handel, sounding to me not idiomatic. The singing is not bad, though. Does the CD version work for you?
    It's a delight. D'Archangelo and Netrebko are superb.

    I think the dvd got slated for some gimmicky staging. That's not apparent on the cd, but I'm no expert. I just enjoyed it.

    I'm only allergic to two things: country and western music, and the crackle, hiss and distortion of old live recordings. I therefore find my self more often listening to Barenboim rather than Bohm, Dessay rather than Callas, Garança rather than Schwartzkopf. Listening to Harnoncourt's Nozze was no hardship.
    Last edited by Chilham; Jul-04-2021 at 12:47.

  21. #12462
    Senior Member Chilham's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Location
    In my castle
    Posts
    1,655
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default



    Byrd: Mass for Five Voices

    Byrd: Infelix Ego

    Philippe Herreweghe

    Collegium Vocale Gent




    Byrd: Mass for Four Voices

    Peter Phillips

    The Tallis Scholars




    Byrd: The Great Service

    Christian Wilson

    Odyssean Ensemble, Colm Carey, David Suchet




    Verdi: Requiem

    Antonio Pappano

    Anja Harteros, Sonia Ganassi, Rolando Villazón, René Pape, Orchestra e Coro dell'Accademia di Saint Cecilia

  22. Likes Rogerx, Malx, HenryPenfold and 9 others liked this post
  23. #12463
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Jun 2020
    Posts
    660
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Going backwards now. A very interesting rendition compared to his Columbia one. SQ's no match of course, though not bad at all for a 1938 live recording -and its poise comes through.

    mahler 9 1938.jpg

    Regards,

    Vincula

  24. Likes Malx, HenryPenfold, Rmathuln and 7 others liked this post
  25. #12464
    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2018
    Location
    On the border.
    Posts
    29,244
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default




    Barber: Cello Concerto & Britten: Symphony for Cello & Orchestra

    Yo-Yo Ma (cello)

    Baltimore Symphony Orchestra, David Zinman
    “Never argue with an idiot. They will drag you down to their level and beat you with experience.” ― Mark Twain

  26. Likes HenryPenfold, Chilham, Rmathuln and 8 others liked this post
  27. #12465
    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Worcestershire, England
    Posts
    10,304
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    I do like Bantock's music but playing nothing but Bantock for days seems almost heroic. How is it working for you?
    Not too bad at all - I find that about two and a half hours over three successive days is manageable. For the ten days prior to this I was playing a Wagner opera daily so in terms of the specific gravity of Bantock's music Wagner was the ideal prep!
    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

  28. Likes Enthusiast liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •