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Thread: Current Listening Vol VII

  1. #13996
    Senior Member Gothos's Avatar
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    "Puritanism:The haunting fear that someone,somewhere,may be happy."

    H.L.Mencken

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Mozart: Piano Concertos Nos. 17 & 18 for Piano and Orchestra

    Murray Perahia (piano)

    English Chamber Orchestra

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Bach: Italian Concerto, BWV 971 – Toccata, BWV 911 – Duets, BWV 802-805 – English Suite, BWV 811

    Angela Hewitt (piano)

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    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by haziz View Post
    Best Eroica ever recorded! That is quite a recommendation, and a bit of a challenge.

    I am listening to the sample you gave as I type this, and I will see if either Tidal or Qobuz have this particular recording. I have subscriptions to both services. I am also quite willing to spend the money if that particular remastering is the best.

    I would urge you to listen to Bernstein's 1964 recording with the NY Philharmonic, or the recent recording by the Pittsburg SO and Manfred Honeck, which also has the benefit of superb sound, in addition to artistic excellence. Those are my current cream of the crop, although the recordings by Karajan (his 1980s digital recording is probably his best Eroica), Szell and Monteux are also noteworthy.

    See if you still think of the Furtwangler as still the best Eroica ever, after listening to Bernstein's or Honeck's recordings!
    When I say best ever Eroica, I mean the one I like the most!

    I have the 1964 Bernstein Eroica, in the complete Sony cycle (I'm listening to it now as I type) and it's a very good performance, though it has its detractors.

    As the years go by, this symphony grows and grows on me.

    Off the top of my head, current faves - Barbirolli (1967), Klemperer (1959), Furtwangler (1944), Francois-Xavier Roth, Szell, Immerseel, Bruggen (earlier recording).

    I don't know the Honeck, in fact I know nothing about him. I shall check it out on Qobuz and if I really like it I'll buy a download.

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    Senior Member Rogerx's Avatar
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    Beethoven: Cello Sonatas & Variations


    Gautier Capuçon (cello) & Frank Braley (piano)

    Beethoven: Cello Sonata No. 1 in F major, Op. 5 No. 1
    Beethoven: Cello Sonata No. 2 in G minor, Op. 5 No. 2
    Beethoven: Cello Sonata No. 3 in A major, Op. 69
    Beethoven: Cello Sonata No. 4 in C major, Op. 102 No. 1
    Beethoven: Cello Sonata No. 5 in D major, Op. 102 No. 2
    Beethoven: Cello Sonatas Nos. 1-5
    Beethoven: Variations (12) on "Ein Mädchen oder Weibchen" for Cello and Piano, Op. 66
    Beethoven: Variations (12) on "See the conquering hero comes" for Cello and Piano, WoO 45
    Beethoven: Variations (7) on "Bei Männern, welche Liebe fühlen", for Cello and Piano, WoO 46

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    Senior Member 13hm13's Avatar
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    Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Camerata Academica Des Mozarteums Salzburg, Sándor Végh ‎– Symphonies 40 & 41

    R-14685154-1579600975-7011.jpeg.jpg

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    Senior Member 13hm13's Avatar
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    Zubin Mehta, Strauss, The Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, David Frisina ‎– Ein Heldenleben

    R-12911159-1544361872-6478.jpeg.jpg

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    Senior Member Malx's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by haziz View Post
    Yes. Of course the sound quality is one of the main factors that turns me off of recordings from earlier than about 1955 - 1957, and is a big issue when it comes to Furtwangler's recordings, and others of that vintage. It is not the only issue however. Listening to Furtwangler's recordings and trying quite hard to keep an open mind, I am not particularly struck by his artistic merit or vision. He was probably a competent conductor, indeed judging by the amount of adulation he tends to receive, he was probably more than competent. I have not listened to a lot of Toscanini either, mainly because of the same issue with recording sound quality. If I am asked to dive into the great Furtwangler vs. Toscanini debate, I would probably say neither, but if forced to pick one, I would probably side with Toscanini. My only exposure to Toscanini is via some of his Beethoven recordings.

    Somehow I am OK with practically any recording from about 1957 onwards, and am OK with a handful of recordings from 1951 on (Kempff's Mono Beethoven Sonata cycle, Karajan's Beethoven Cycle with the Philharmonia on EMI [1951-1955], Ansermet's superb 1954 recording of Borodin's Symphony No. 2). I am very tolerant of tape hiss, I think my main issue with vintage recordings from before 1957 is mainly a lack of dynamic range and sound which somehow manages to be both "thin" and "constricted". I am not sure how else to describe it.

    I did genuinely try to give Furtwangler a real listen within the last couple of years. I even started a thread regarding his recordings asking about both sound quality as well as artistic merit. I listened to many of the recordings suggested. I am still quite underwhelmed.

    My thread from earlier regarding Furtwangler:

    Furtwangler Sound Quality?
    Thanks for the fulsome response - for some reason I had missed your thread on the very point I was making so I will have a read through later in the day.


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  16. #14004
    Senior Member Bourdon's Avatar
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    German Consort Music

    One of my favorite recordings with the Parley of Instruments.




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    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Britten's own recording of his War Requiem will always hold a special place in the heart of everyone who loves this work, but this 1991 Chandos recording is at least as good as its predecessor and sonically it is absolutely magnificent. Heather Harper here finally gets to record the part she sang at the world premiere when Vishnevskaya was prevented from travelling to England by the Soviet authorities. I suppose one might wish that she had recorded it just a few years earlier (she retired after making this recording) but she is still in splendid voice and wonderfully authoratative. Langridge and Shirley-Quirk, both experienced Britten singers are the equal of Pears and Fischer-Dieskau and Hickox controls his forces in masterly fashion. This could be the best thing he ever did for the gramophone and he is given absolutely top notch Chandos sound , which is the equal of anything you would hear today.

    A superb set.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  20. #14006
    Senior Member HenryPenfold's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tsaraslondon View Post


    Britten's own recording of his War Requiem will always hold a special place in the heart of everyone who loves this work, but this 1991 Chandos recording is at least as good as its predecessor and sonically it is absolutely magnificent. Heather Harper here finally gets to record the part she sang at the world premiere when Vishnevskaya was prevented from travelling to England by the Soviet authorities. I suppose one might wish that she had recorded it just a few years earlier (she retired after making this recording) but she is still in splendid voice and wonderfully authoratative. Langridge and Shirley-Quirk, both experienced Britten singers are the equal of Pears and Fischer-Dieskau and Hickox controls his forces in masterly fashion. This could be the best thing he ever did for the gramophone and he is given absolutely top notch Chandos sound , which is the equal of anything you would hear today.

    A superb set.
    I think I prefer this to Ben's (never thought I'd ever say that!).

    In fact Hickox is my goto for a number of the operas too. Again, I never thought I'd ever favour other performances over the Decca 'originals'.

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    Senior Member elgars ghost's Avatar
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    György Ligeti - various works part five for late morning and early afternoon.


    The Big Turtle Fanfare from the South China Sea for solo trumpet (1985):
    Piano Concerto (1985–88):
    Mysteries of the Macabre - three arias from the opera Le Grand Macabre, arr. for trumpet and chamber orchestra (1974-77 - arr. 1991):
    Violin Concerto (1992):
    Hamburg Concerto for horn and chamber orchestra with four obligato natural horns (1998-99 - rev. 2003):
    Síppal, dobbal, nádihegedűvel [With Pipes, Drums, Fiddles] - cycle of seven songs for mezzo-soprano and four percussionists [Texts: Sándor Weöres] (2000):




    Der Sommer - song for voice and piano [Text: Friedrich Hölderlin] (1989):
    Mysteries of the Macabre - three arias from the opera Le Grand Macabre, arr. for coloratura soprano and ensemble [Texts: György Ligeti/Michael Meschke] (1974-77 - arr. 1991):
    Nonsense madrigals - six songs for six male voices [Texts: Lewis Carroll/William Brighty Rands/Heinrich Hoffmann] (1988–93):




    Sonata for solo viola (1991–94):

    '...a violator of his word, a libertine over head and ears in debt and disgrace, a despiser of domestic ties, the companion of gamblers and demireps, a man who has just closed half a century without a single claim on the gratitude of his country or the respect of posterity...' - Leigh Hunt on the Prince Regent (later George IV).

    ὃν οἱ θεοὶ φιλοῦσιν ἀποθνῄσκει νέος [Those whom the gods love die young] - Menander

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    Senior Member Tsaraslondon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by HenryPenfold View Post
    I think I prefer this to Ben's (never thought I'd ever say that!).

    In fact Hickox is my goto for a number of the operas too. Again, I never thought I'd ever favour other performances over the Decca 'originals'.
    Well I wouldn't say I prefer it, but I like them each equally. I do have a certain attachment to the Britten, as it was still fairly new when I first became interested in Britten's music. Indeed at that time, Britten's own recordings were usually the only ones available.

    Hickox was one of those who led the new wave of Britten conductors. Most of his Britten operas are splendid, especially Billy Budd, which I think finer even than Britten's recording.
    "It's not enough to have a beautiful voice." Maria Callas

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  26. #14009
    Senior Member Bourdon's Avatar
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    Enescu


    Piano sonatas 1 & 3


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  28. #14010
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    Tchaikovsky: Symphony No. 5
    London Philharmonic Orchestra - Vladimir Jurowski

    Another excellent recording of Tchaikovsky's masterpiece.


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