Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast
Results 1 to 15 of 72

Thread: Chain Reactions

  1. #1
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Gemtown in Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    36

    Default Chain Reactions

    I would like to chat about music and find out about new pieces. I'm wondering if this format will 'fit the bill'.

    I shall post a short piece or extract of any type or era of classical music (up to 20 minutes, but preferably shorter).

    I shall say something about my own response to it.

    The next poster, please, will also say what he or she thinks of the piece I posted, before posting a short musical piece or extract of his or her own, with a comment-response.

    What you say can be a purely personal response or you could give some opinion or information about more technical musical matters.

    The pieces don't have to be thematically linked or anything - just pieces you've chosen out of interest or because you like them.

    I look forward to listening and learning. Thank you in advance for any helpful responses.

    Live long & prosper.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    PS - There is a difficulty with this thread, I now realise - that while one poster is listening and getting his/her comment ready, another poster may be doing the same!

    Art Rock has shown one good solution - to post your interest & that you're going next and then re-edit the post to show your comments and your choice.

    If two posters do accidentally answer at very nearly the same time, that doesn't matter, so long as somebody listens to both the choices that are put forward.
    The next poster could respond to both the choices before posting their own.

    I will also keep checking that everyone's choice has at least one comment on it.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Apr-03-2021 at 15:11.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

  2. Likes Art Rock, Taggart, ArtMusic and 5 others liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Gemtown in Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    36

    Default

    Pandolfi Mealli - La Cesta 1660



    Andrew Manze, baroque violin
    Richard Egarr, harpsichord
    Fred Jacobs, Theorbo
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    I knew nothing about this composer until my fiddle teacher in East Anglia told me about him - Fiddle Guru is an HIP Baroque professional who plays viola with La Serenissima, and he values what he calls 'experimental' baroque music.

    What I like about this music is its strange eerie quality - to my untutored ear it sounds Arabian in places. I also like the tone of Andrew Manze's violin and how it gives a pleasing melancholy to the piece, as if a sad but true comment on time and life. The changes of pace seem organic like birdsong. A lot of the baroque music I like is 'hummable' and I'm a great fan of folk songs, but this one doesn't have that quality. For me, it is a beautiful dream.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Apr-03-2021 at 15:02.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

  4. Likes Taggart, Art Rock, ArtMusic liked this post
  5. #3
    Moderator Art Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kampen (NL)
    Posts
    27,012
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Pandolfi Mealli - La Cesta 1660

    Well, this is out of my comfort zone. I don't particularly like baroque with the huge exception of JS Bach. This was a very pleasant surprise. I especially like the first two and a half minutes, where the violin soars in a way I would not have recognized as early baroque (in contrast to the other instruments). After that it sounds a bit more generic for its time (the final is original once more), but it never outstays its welcome for me in spite of my generally indifferent feelings to this time period. Thanks for introducing me to this piece (and this composer)!



    Arnold Bax - November woods 1917



    November Woods is a tone poem completed in 1917 by British composer Arnold Bax (1883 - 1953). Of his many tone poems, this may not be the most famous, but for me it is the best. Bax stated that the piece "may be taken as an impression of the dank and stormy music of nature in the late autumn, but the whole piece and its origins are connected with certain rather troublous experiences I was going through myself at the time...."
    Last edited by Art Rock; Apr-03-2021 at 14:36.

  6. #4
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yorkshire (ex-Glasgow)
    Posts
    4,325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Arnold Bax - November woods 1917

    This not a period I listen to a lot. It is very much of its age - the influence of Victorian romanticism in the more harmonic sections interspersed by discords which were becoming part of 20th century music. It was a thoughtful piece and allowed me to broaden my listening horizons. I appreciated the music. Thankyou for posting

    J.S. Bach: Prelude and Fugue in C minor (WTK, Book II, No.2) , BWV 871



    This is something that I'm attempting to play at the minute. It's a nice bouncy prelude followed by a simple but thoughtful fugue. What I like about this performance is that it doesn't feel rushed and gives the music time to breathe. It lets the interplay in the prelude happen naturally and makes the fugue comprehensible.
    Last edited by Taggart; Apr-03-2021 at 15:17.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

  7. Likes Ingélou, Art Rock, ArtMusic and 1 others liked this post
  8. #5
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Gemtown in Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    36

    Default

    J.S. Bach: Prelude and Fugue in C minor (WTK, Book II, No.2) , BWV 871

    Despite being a lover of baroque music, and married to a Huge Bach Fan, I prefer other baroque composers. I enjoyed this piece, for its spriggy patterns and the way it builds up, like a murmuration of starlings converging on a lake. However, I couldn't help wishing that this had been a harpsichord version - the piano (for me) makes the music sound more flippant and incidental.

    John Cage - Dream (1948)



    However, I do like the piano in this piece of earlier-style John Cage. It has a beautiful tone. I love the meandering notes, and the fitful pauses, giving me a feeling of 'trying sounds out'. To me it's not so much like a dream, as like that interregnum between settling to sleep and actually getting off - a long two minutes where scraps of 'deeply meaningful' nonsense drift through your head, never to be remembered after. Just for a moment, though, one is on the verge of knowing the meaning of everything.

    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Edit: Mandryka and I cross-posted. I had listened and framed a response to Mandryka's post before realising that Art Rock is going to connect the two streams again. So I'll post my response to Mandryka's post here:

    Cassandra Miller & Juliet Fraser 'Tracery : T. Rex'

    I thought it an interesting sound which gives some insight into tones used in conversation and social games that people play. It is music, and it is clever. One of my school friends, a retired violin teacher, is now into improvised music and one of her group does this talk-singing too, so I am fairly used to this type of music. I like the way in Tracery that the disturbing 'cronelike chanting' gives way to more conversational music and then finally breaks up just like a real-life conversation does.
    Taggart tells me that this piece was commissioned for Snape last year - I think it would have been a very successful performance (in terms of audience-appreciation). Thanks for posting.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Apr-03-2021 at 16:27.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

  9. Likes Taggart, HenryPenfold, ArtMusic and 2 others liked this post
  10. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    8,633
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    2

    Default

    BWV 871 That's a agreeable performance, pretty and sweet.

    Not managed to get into that one -- what do you make of this?



    Unfortunately I can't find the T Rex song which inspired it. I found it because I'm interested in meditation and music. Some more details about the Traceries project here.

    https://cassandramiller.wordpress.co...02/07/tracery/
    Last edited by Mandryka; Apr-03-2021 at 15:52.

  11. #7
    Moderator Art Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kampen (NL)
    Posts
    27,012
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    John Cage - Dream (1948)

    Although I am not a big fan of solo piano in general, I do like John Cage a lot, and this piece (which I heard before) is another example why. The piece is a soundscape hovering somewhere between the new age/ambient pieces by the likes of Harold Budd and George Winston on the one hand and the more formal works of say Satie and Debussy. It is peaceful, meditative, and has the right length. I just wish that all those Cage-haters did not base their opinion on one piece only (4'33"). Good choice.

    Cassandra Miller - Tracery - T. Rex (around 2018?)

    I am in general interested in contemporary classical music, and also in the influences of pop/rock on modern classical compositions. This ticks both boxes. I can't ID the T. Rex song either by the way. It is an interesting piece, but maybe more suited to a live rendition than listening to it as if it were a recording. She realizes an amazing variation in sound patterns, just from a few voices, that sound like distorted samples put together collage style. This was an interesting piece by a composer I had not listened to before.

    Thanks both for these choices!


    Toru Takemitsu - A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Garden (1977)



    Takemitsu is Japan's most famous classical composer, with a style influenced by Debussy and Messiaen, with injections of Japanese traditions. This is one of his most famous works, with a title that could have been taken from a Japanese poem.
    Last edited by Art Rock; Apr-03-2021 at 16:17.

  12. Likes Ingélou, Taggart, SeptimalTritone liked this post
  13. #8
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Gemtown in Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    36

    Default

    Toru Takemitsu - A Flock Descends into the Pentagonal Garden (1977)

    I am an ignoramus, having come to classical music so late, but even I had heard of Takemitsu, maybe from Mahlerian when he was on TC in the olden days (he lived in Japan). However, I needed to put the composer into context and found this article very helpful. I was interested to read that Cage was a big influence on Takemitsu.
    https://www.indianapolissymphony.org...agonal-garden/

    This style of music is not my natural territory but I can truthfully say that I enjoyed the piece. It's powerful and although I am not used to discordant sounds, I can see how they work here in building up the atmosphere. I like the intermix of tinkling peaceful sounds and more threatening brass at c. 8 minutes 55 seconds. Maybe because he is using Japanese traditions as well as modern-classical-music trends, I find it less shapeless and meaningless than some other music of this era that I've listened to. I shall try more of this composer. Thanks for posting.


    John Tavener - Thrinos for solo cello (1990) - Raphael Wallfisch, cello

    (from Google) Thrinos (Lament) for solo cello was composed late in 1990, for Stephen Isserlis. The title, Tavener writes, 'has both liturgical and folk significance in Greece - the Thrinos of the Mother of God sung at the Epitaphios on Good Friday and the Thrinos of mourning which is chanted over the dead body on the house of a close friend.' Tavener wrote his Thrinos to commemorate the death of a close friend.
    (Michael Stewart - source of quotation)



    A beautiful, moving, elegiac piece. I felt I could relate to this piece because of the wonderful cello-sounds, and also because some of the musical themes reminded me of styles of music that I love - a Welsh lullaby, a bit of klezmer. For me this piece has spiritual depth.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Apr-03-2021 at 17:43.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

  14. Likes Art Rock, Taggart liked this post
  15. #9
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yorkshire (ex-Glasgow)
    Posts
    4,325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    John Tavener - Thrinos for solo cello (1990) - Raphael Wallfisch, cello

    An interesting piece. Beautiful cello sounds and a mixture of different themes. Lovely to listen to but I kept looking for a structure that didn't seem to be there.

    Edvard Grieg - Wedding Day at Troldhaugen


    Originally written for the 25th wedding anniversary of Grieg and his wife Nina.It is a march in imitation of the Norwegian (and Shetland) wedding march; it also reflects the joy of the wedding. I enjoy the folk flavoured nature of Grieg's work and the sprightly nature of the tune.
    Last edited by Taggart; Apr-03-2021 at 17:58.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

  16. Likes Ingélou, Art Rock, ArtMusic and 1 others liked this post
  17. #10
    Senior Member SeptimalTritone's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2014
    Posts
    1,392
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Regarding the Grieg - loved the rustic open fifths, the percussive rhythms, and the exotic contrasting sections!

    ...

    Xenakis - Bohor (1962) for 8-channel tape. This uses Laotian mouth organ, Iraqi/Hindu jewelry, Byzantine chant, and piano as sound sources, all manipulated in some way. You can hear these elements if you listen carefully - however, the main point is the unique overall sound world. It's a beautiful gradually evolving soundscape. This was one of some guy's (yes, the one and only some guy for those who have been here for way too long) favorite pieces. And I like this too - to me, it's so evocative that I get a mental image of being in some underground technological Dwarven fantasy ruins.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DODVNHukY0I

    I think that as personally uncompromising as some guy was, that the music he advocated was much more approachable than his uncompromising personality made the music seem! This is an immediately approachable and gorgeous world of sound - and it undergoes a gradual "crescendo" in intensity as the piece goes on - and this kind of gradual, subtle, and varied increase in intensity for 20 minutes is impossible under "normal" instrumental symphonic/chamber music with its focus on themes, lines, and harmonies. And this is why different kinds of music have completely different ways in which they should be broken down and evaluated.
    Last edited by SeptimalTritone; Apr-04-2021 at 02:11.

  18. Likes Art Rock, Taggart, Ingélou liked this post
  19. #11
    Moderator Art Rock's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Kampen (NL)
    Posts
    27,012
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Xenakis - Bohor (1962)

    I have a few Xenakis CD's, but they are all with works on regular instruments - this is the first time I encounter a Xenakis work for tape. It is a fascinating combination of harshness and subtlety, very evocative - in some ways, although it is still quite different, it reminded me of the outstanding soundtrack of the Chernobyl TV series by Hildur Guðnadóttir. I enjoyed listening to it throughout - right up to the very abrupt end. At first, I was not sure I would return to it very often, but now that it's finished I think I will. Thanks for this new experience.


    Lilburn - Aotearoa overture (1940)



    Douglas Lilburn was the most famous New Zealand composer. His recorded legacy is still small, but includes three symphonies and this concerto overture (Aotearoa is the Māori name for New Zealand).
    Last edited by Art Rock; Apr-04-2021 at 06:15.

  20. Likes Taggart, Ingélou, SeptimalTritone liked this post
  21. #12
    Senior Member SONNET CLV's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2014
    Location
    Paradise, Montana ... on
    Posts
    3,179
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Chain Reactions

    Being obstinate (and somewhat counter-social), I will not participate in this particular "chain reaction" thread, but rather comment, more in a "chain link" manner, on each of the works thus far posted, just because I would like to say something about them.

    I was impressed by the Pandolfi Mealli La Cesta. I had never heard this piece before, and I don't recall hearing of the composer, but I reckon if I searched through some of the Baroque box sets in my collection I'd find something by the composer. I listened to the entire piece, struck by the magical darkness of the work. It had a sense of that somewhat off-kilter Baroque tuning that puts pitches at non-standard modern tone frequencies, especially in the early portion of the work. An imaginative piece by any standard. Thank you for introducing it.

    The Bax is an old favorite, but it's not my favorite Bax. That accolade goes to Tintagel, which to my ears is the ultimate Bax work. I can listen to (and have listened to) Tintagel on repeat mode and never tire of it. No other Bax gives me the same freshness with every listen. Other Bax works I rate highly are the 3rd and 4th Symphonies, though I do enjoy all of the Bax symphonies. November Woods does present the Bax sound splendidly and is a fine introduction to the composer's music, but I will still give the nod to Tintagel. (By the way, I love scrolling scores accompanying music. I'd never seen the score to this tone poem, so that was special.)

    I enjoy hearing new versions (interpretations, performances) of the Bach keyboard masterpieces. I listen with little concern about critiquing one performance against another. Bach is just so splendid, let everyone take a crack at him. Those good players will have something to say and will communicate to us listeners. And this was my first acquaintance (that I recall) with hearing Schiff play this music. A fine performance. I wish Taggart all the best in mastering this work. When I play anything by Bach, one might mistake the music for a piece by Stockhausen. But then I grew up playing guitar in a heavy metal band, so what do I know about Bach keyboard music!

    Dream. Early John Cage piano music tends to strike me as rather empty. And so does Dream. I appreciate the poster's appreciation of the piano sound. How might that same instrument sound with some Beethoven or Liszt coming off the fingers? Cage here seems to be dreaming, indeed, perhaps of how to change the sound of a piano by preparing it, or how the music might sound even more emptier if even more notes were taken out. I have dozens of discs full of John Cage piano music and I do enjoy much of it, though I often enjoy it more for its thoughtful outrageousness rather than "musical" qualities such as melody, harmony, or memorability. I'm not against experimental music, but this Dream piece seems to just meander along (as does much else by Cage) and makes me wish the fellow would finally just wake up and get on with something else.

    Tracery: T Rex is that kind of piece I encounter from time to time on discs from the NEOS label, a label concentrating on new music and a label which puts out a compilation each year from the Donaueschinger Musiktage. Interestingly enough, John Cage has done a lot of experimental vocal music, and I find his stuff much more enjoyable and interesting than this. Though I remain an advocate of new music and experimental music, some pieces strike me simply as silly. At least the lyrics were in a language I understand. Perhaps it would sound better had it been in Hungarian. Time to move on (and even Cage's Dream would be a relief following this. I have a feeling I'd enjoy the original T. Rex song much more than this revisitation.)

    Takemitsu is always competent and intriguing. This is what the best of contemporary music should be -- revelatory and interesting on the ears and mind. Repeat listenings are welcome.

    I've never been a big John Tavener fan, but I do love solo cello music and the performances of cellist Raphael Wallfisch, whom I remember best from his playing of the Finzi Concerto, one of the great recordings of our age. This particular piece ranks in my estimation with the Dream work by Cage. It's a touch too little to hold my interest over its length. I'd rather hear the Bach Cello Suites, or even experimental cellos music by Xenakis. A cello playing Gregorian chant is a cello playing Gregorian chant. I suspect it's not supposed to be too exciting or fresh sounding. Still, because of Wallfisch, the piece is well performed. That much I can tell.

    You gotta love Grieg. Grieg is a composer I grew up with as I discovered classical music in my youth. His Piano Concerto is one of the great pieces. I don't listen to Grieg much any more, yet every time I hear his music (usually by way of radio broadcasts) I deeply enjoy it. The fellow is a master, and hearing this piano piece (a familiar piece) reminds me again that I shouldn't ignore Grieg. After all, I do have that big Brilliant Classics 21-CD compilation of music by Grieg. I should be combing through those discs right now.

    I loved the Iannis Xenakis Bohor. If Takemitsu is what contemporary music should be like, so is Xenakis, though in its way it is so totally different from Takemitsu. But then I'm a fan of "noise music", that industrial stuff that emits from dark minds and darker pieces of machinery. This is definitely industrial music, and beautiful in its own way, crashing and splashing and banging and jangling. How do people think this stuff up? That's what I think about when I encounter stimulating new art. And it is why so many discs of Xenakis's music reside on my record/CD shelves.

    Ah, Douglas Lilburn. What a follow up to Xenakis and Bohor. One of the anomalies of being a music lover is that one can enthusiastically enjoy such wide ranging pieces, lacking any ability to favor the one over the other. I first encountered Lilburn through his symphonies, of which I have all three in two different recordings in my collection. This is wonderful pastoral music, and if anyone doesn't like this stuff it's likely because they lack ears.

    Well ... what a chain of links this has been.

    Thank you all for posting and giving me a wonderful evening of reflection on music and such. I deeply enjoyed the experience, to which I came following a session of listening to Bach's Easter Oratorio. Music! Is there anything like it?
    Last edited by SONNET CLV; Apr-04-2021 at 06:56.

  22. Likes Art Rock, Taggart, Ingélou and 1 others liked this post
  23. #13
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Gemtown in Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    36

    Default

    Thank you, Sonnet, for your collected reviews - it was very interesting to read, and the more the merrier!
    ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

    Going back to Art Rock's Choice, Lilburn - Aotearoa overture (1940) - I concur with Sonnet's description of it as 'wonderful pastoral stuff'. I like it but only 'quite like it', because I find this style of music too smooth and flowing, with nothing to make me sit up, and no compelling melodies. But I'm still very glad to have heard it and to fill in my knowledge of music after 1900.

    Barbara Strozzi. "Che si può fare". Mariana Flores. soprano.



    I found this baroque composer of vocal music myself, looking for women composers, and I do like her songs and this one in particular, with its tragic sense of fate thwarting human desires. I love the way the instruments meld in with the voice on Strozzi's songs and then have little interludes. I find her songs both reflective and moving, if that doesn't seem too paradoxical.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Apr-04-2021 at 10:01.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

  24. Likes Art Rock, Taggart liked this post
  25. #14
    Sr. Moderator Taggart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Yorkshire (ex-Glasgow)
    Posts
    4,325
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    1

    Default

    Barbara Strozzi. "Che si può fare". Mariana Flores. soprano.

    What is to be done? If you can't fight fate, then write like this. Lovely interplay of instrument and voice, with the darkness of the continuo emphasizing the despair of the lyrics. The continuo provides the motion or power against which the voice reflects. Beautiful.

    Vaughan Williams - Five Variants of 'Dives and Lazarus'


    The tune is used for a number of folk songs. It was first collected by Lucy Broadwood in 1893. Vaughan Williams used it in 1906 as the hymn tune 'Kingsfold' ('I heard the voice of Jesus say'). He claimed to have found the tune himself in the village of Kingsfold, near Horsham in West Sussex. Vaughan Williams also used it in his popular English Folk Song Suite (1923). This version is a commission from the British Council to be played at the 1939 World's Fair in New York City. It is mean as a celebration of Britishness. The piece has a lovely pastoral feel and the harp helps it sound out. A real taste of the British countryside
    Last edited by Taggart; Apr-04-2021 at 12:33.
    Music begins where words leave off. Music expresses the inexpressible.

  26. Likes Ingélou, Art Rock liked this post
  27. #15
    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Gemtown in Yorkshire
    Posts
    5,529
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    36

    Default

    Vaughan Williams - Five Variants of 'Dives and Lazarus'

    Well, it's another smooth, flowing, pastoral, post-1900 piece - something I generally don't go for, but my spouse adores. (He also likes what he calls 'sprightly' pieces - what I call 'annoyingly perky'.) Moreover, I have a particular dislike for folk treated in the drawing room manner - I prefer a wee bit of a crackle in the smooth tenor voice, the bow rasping as it meets the fiddle string.

    However, I like this one because I know the tune and the ballad that it is based on intimately ('Dives & Lazarus' featured in my MA thesis on traditional religious ballads), and the air has something dark and sad and moving about it. The 'five variants' seem to be woven together into a symphony - again, something I normally wouldn't like, but I enjoyed listening to this one develop. It stirs my emotions.


    Debussy - Danse sacrée et danse profane, for harp and strings (1904)

    This piece was on a list of twentieth-century pieces sent to me in 2013 by PetrB, who was a good friend to me before he left TC and disappeared into the ether. I am grateful to him, because he gave me chances to learn and had sympathy and advice for me when I was suffering with my two violin teachers, each difficult in different ways. PetrB knew that I was old-fashioned and wedded to melody above all, so he suggested some more modern pieces that wouldn't shock my ears too much. I haven't listened to this one since 2013, so it's like hearing a new piece for me.



    I like this. It does annoy me by being too sweet and charming in places - sometimes even 'breezy' - but I love the contrast in sounds between the smooth violins and the prickling harp and I like the feeling I get that it's going somewhere and finally arrives.
    Last edited by Ingélou; Apr-04-2021 at 15:13.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

  28. Likes Art Rock, Taggart, SeptimalTritone liked this post
Page 1 of 5 12345 LastLast

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •