View Poll Results: Are you a musical adventurer or not?

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  • Adventurer/nomad

    11 26.83%
  • Stay-at-home

    16 39.02%
  • A bit of both (post explanation if possible)

    14 34.15%
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Thread: Are you an adventurer or a stay-at-home?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    Default Are you an adventurer or a stay-at-home?

    I wonder if you would describe yourself as a musical adventurer or a more stay at home sort of music lover? What do I mean?

    Adventurer - a nomad, perhaps. Someone who is always searching for new musical experiences, whether they be new music that is different to what they know, new genres, new and notably different performance styles. An adventurer doesn't leave what s/he's moved on from but wants to add different things to it.

    Stay-at-home - you are "where you want to be" and all that is left is undertaking slow methodical improvements or perhaps merely maintenance. Someone who knows what they like and is mostly concerned with finding more that is not so very different.

    It will be interesting to read reasons, too.
    Last edited by Enthusiast; Apr-10-2021 at 15:52.

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  3. #2
    Senior Member Strange Magic's Avatar
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    All my "esthetic" life, I have been the recipient of happy new interests in art and music by not feverishly working at increasing the universe of things I examine so that I can say to myself (or others) that I have Examined It All. I shall never, ever hear all the symphonies of Myaskovsky--life is too short and there is much wonderful music and art to enjoy again and again (I am a fervent re-reader of books I enjoy: I re-read Moby Dick about every five years--it gets always better).

    But Fate brings me, on the breeze, wonderful things. It's how I discovered the Luminist painters, as a specific example--the chance receipt of a book about them. Many others: just spur-of-the moment decisions to listen to this or that selection mentioned here on TC--some click; some don't.

    So it's a mixture of a bit of both for me. And in addition to experiencing art and music, I--we--all have other interests and lives to lead: Ars longa, vita brevis indeed!

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  5. #3
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    A mix of both.

    I mostly listen to certain works by a limited number of composers: the three B's, Dvorak, Bruckner, Mendelssohn, Bartok, Haydn, Mozart.

    But I keep trying to broaden my horizons, with a good deal of success. I have been listening avidly to classical music for only about four years, and I am 22, so I feel compelled at times to listen to music I haven't heard before.

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  7. #4
    Moderator Nereffid's Avatar
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    I voted Adventurer/nomad, but perhaps "expansionist" might be a better description. I'm more about widening my horizons rather than finding new ones. The works I liked when I first started listening 30-something years ago, I still like. But I'm constantly finding that music I didn't like in the past has graduated to not so bad to actually OK. Plus TC is full of little reminders: "oh, I haven't heard that yet", or "I must get back to this composer"...

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  9. #5
    Senior Member Allegro Con Brio's Avatar
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    A bit of both. I return often to my favorite composers and works in new performances (particularly Bach; I doubt if I could go two days without him), but at least once a week or so I try to listen to something I haven’t previously heard, particularly something more contemporary and “adventurous.” I don’t always connect with it, but it always broadens my horizons and is usually a positive experience. I purposefully try to mix up my listening habits so music of all genres from 1100-1990 is always on my soundtrack. IMO there’s just too much rich and exciting variety within the world of CM to stick to one section of it. This week’s listening featured Verdi’s Aida, Shostakovich’s quartets, Mendelssohn’s piano trios, Lutoslawski’s cello concerto, Medtner’s piano sonatas, Penderecki’s St. Luke Passion and Bach’s St. Matthew.
    Last edited by Allegro Con Brio; Apr-10-2021 at 15:16.
    "If we understood the world, we would realize that there is a logic of harmony underlying its manifold apparent dissonances." - Jean Sibelius

    "Art, like morality, consists of drawing the line somewhere." - G.K. Chesterton

    "Ceaseless work, analysis, reflection, writing much, endless self-correction, that is my secret." - Johann Sebastian Bach

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    Senior Member Ingélou's Avatar
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    When I joined the site, I was an adventurer - aware of my ignorance, I wanted to get a general mind-map of classical music, and asking advice about different styles and composers and what to listen out for was a great way of making friends.

    But I voted for 'stay at home' today as a lot of my friends have left the site and I have a better but still basic knowledge of what's available and what I like, plus I want to deepen my knowledge of early music and baroque and also folk music, because this is where my heart lies.

    I try to get out occasionally, but am working on my home to make it a wonderful place to stay.
    ~ Mollie ~
    My fiddle my joy.

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  13. #7
    Senior Member Wilhelm Theophilus's Avatar
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    who doesn't want to find good music they're not already familiar with?

    No one is going to choose the stay-at-home option. You've framed it with many negative connotations, its a trap! Plus it doesn't represent anyone. I think you may misunderstand peoples views of certain genres of modern music.

  14. #8
    Senior Member Wilhelm Theophilus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    and is mostly concerned with finding more that is not so very different
    Are Bach and Sibelius different? Handel and Wagner?

  15. #9
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
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    *Looks at the original post and the name of the poster*

    Is this just another thread to elevate avant-garde music?

  16. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nereffid View Post
    I voted Adventurer/nomad, but perhaps "expansionist" might be a better description. I'm more about widening my horizons rather than finding new ones. The works I liked when I first started listening 30-something years ago, I still like. But I'm constantly finding that music I didn't like in the past has graduated to not so bad to actually OK. Plus TC is full of little reminders: "oh, I haven't heard that yet", or "I must get back to this composer"...
    Expansionist is a very good word for what I meant. I have added a little edit to my OP to clarify that my adventurer doesn't desert what s/he has loved but may want to add different things to it. I suppose an example might be loving Mozart and Haydn and perhaps wanting to hear them in other performing styles but tending to prefer moving on to a different period rather than digging out more and more Classical period composers?

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  18. #11
    Senior Member Wilhelm Theophilus's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wilhelm Theophilus View Post
    who doesn't want to find good music they're not already familiar with?

    No one is going to choose the stay-at-home option. You've framed it with many negative connotations, its a trap! Plus it doesn't represent anyone. I think you may misunderstand peoples views of certain genres of modern music.
    ok people have chosen it

  19. #12
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    I used to be an adventurer. If someone said Beethoven's Heiliger Dankesang had part-writing not seen since Obrecht, I had to learn about Obrecht. And when John Cage compared the writing styles of Satie and Webern as being time-structured, I had to learn about Webern. Every time I bought a new CD, I would go to the Blair School of Music and look up analyses and would try to acquire scores to mark up.

    Now I don't have the time to chase down every rabbit trail. I've resigned myself to the fact that I won't have time to understand all the complexities of composers like Ferneyhough or Elliott Carter, so I'm not bothering with them.

    At this point, if I have a visceral connection with a piece, I'll get deeper into it, but I've stopped listening just for the sake of listening because someone says the piece or composer is important.

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  21. #13
    Senior Member Ned Low's Avatar
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    On one hand, there are numerous composers that i haven't discovered or listened to. Maybe, out of curiosity, i go through some of their works and find out that i pretty much like them. Or they might even become my favourite composer. Who knows. It's for a certainty a pleasant experience to go through a composer's oeuvre which is new to you.

    On the other hand, i really like to stick with what i love or listen to something slightly similar to the pieces and composers i'm already fond of. Therefore, i tend to spend most of my time trying different recordings of the pieces i like.
    Last edited by Ned Low; Apr-10-2021 at 15:59.

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  23. #14
    Senior Member Enthusiast's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hammeredklavier View Post
    *Looks at the original post and the name of the poster*

    Is this just another thread to elevate avant-garde music?
    Not at all. Exploration may involve wanting to hear very different performances or very different genres. Explorers will try anything. Staying at home is more likely to involve a person knowing which performance style they prefer in, say, Mozart or knowing that they can spend a lifetime with just Romantic (or avant garde!) music and don't need to see what early music or Indian music can do for them.

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  25. #15
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Enthusiast View Post
    what early music or Indian music can do for them.
    Ok, but why not jazz, why not prog-rock? Let's talk about the merits of all other music genres, on this "classical music forum" then.
    Last edited by hammeredklavier; Apr-10-2021 at 16:10.

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