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Thread: Classical Piece Evoking Sincerity, Honesty, Purity

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethereality View Post
    I take a different meaning to this thread, as it asks for honesty, openness, and maybe a lot of suggestions sound more like 'innocence' or 'lightness,' not something 'proactively reached for.' People say Mozart, or Bach and his Prelude in C, or Copland, I don't hear it as much. That ability to seem uncomposed, like Mozart's music just composes itself effortlessly, or that 'cleverness' in them which seems antithetical to the subject, is why he doesn't sound as sincere. It lacks the rawness or imperfection of the stronger forms of sincerity, the reason I love Mozart, but why my favor would go towards like the Puccini above, or Sibelius's 3rd or the Choral Symphony, as very open, more meaningful expressions of purifying struggles.
    The way I take it is music that is most devoid of cynicism or sarcasm, and for me that's Bach. Just about any Bach, really.
    Last edited by dissident; Jul-25-2021 at 13:00.

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    Quote Originally Posted by MatthewWeflen View Post
    Copland definitely. The Tender Land suite is beautiful, especially the final movement.

    Yes, beautifully done. It's a setting of the hymn "Zion's Walls" which Copland arranged also in his old American songs collection.

    I think it's effective in this old YT video I remember that's a compilation of old home movies etc:

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    Senior Member Chilham's Avatar
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    Sibelius with his glorious Symphony No. 7. There are moments of absolute purity and majesty that never fail to move me to tears.

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    Bruckner's Mass in E minor begins in the essence of purity ...

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r8Sb...KingsMusicDept

    the opening for that mass was clearly Ligeti's inspiration for Lux Aeterna

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zy8S...nel=DanielBali
    Last edited by larold; Jul-28-2021 at 19:00.

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  8. #36
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coach G View Post
    "Classical Piece Evoking Sincerity, Honesty, Purity"

    The first name that comes to my mind is Mozart whose craftsmanship implies a wonderful seamless quality as if the music practically composes itself. No doubt, Mozart worked hard to achieve this effect, as what usually appears to be "effortless" requires the most effort.

    When I'm listening to Beethoven, I hear a sense of struggle and heroism, an inner dialogue (not that Beethoven didn't have his more mellow instances as with the wonderful Symphony #6 "Pastorale"). With Bach, I'm carried away by the master's sense of a musical vision and a faith that is intense. With Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich it's the sad, Russian, soulfulness, that gets me. With Brahms it's the fine and sturdy German craftsmanship. With Ravel, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Richard Strauss, it's the orchestral color. With Debussy it's the sense of mystery. For Haydn, it's the sense of fun and joyfulness. For Wagner, it's the passion.

    But Mozart to me, is the one that is the most "pure"; simple, and beautiful. Mozart's Clarinet Concerto, for example, seems to have a wonderful sense of "flow" and peacefulness that just seems to unfold in a very natural way where one feels centered and in the moment, sort of in the spirit of "mindfulness", a term that seems to be all the rage these days.
    This is a wonderful summary, thank you. I am trying to connect some classical music with psychology.

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    Mozart’s clarinet quintet.

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    Senior Member Kjetil Heggelund's Avatar
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    I see Mozart popped up some times, so I don't have to say Mozart. Oh, there I said Mozart, and there again
    I think the Adagio K540 for piano fits nicely.

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  13. #39
    Senior Member Ethereality's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by dissident View Post
    The way I take it is music that is most devoid of cynicism or sarcasm, and for me that's Bach. Just about any Bach, really.
    I kind of agree, though not certain Bach is the best answer either. It's easy to view his reliance on patterns as sometimes a form of intellectual mimicry or manipulation. It's exactly why I love Bach, Mozart, Handel, not giving into their emotions for sacrificing maximum creativity and cleverness. Some of the more sincere, open, honest composers to me are Beethoven, Dvorak, Sibelius, Puccini, my vote would be the first two. I think people are confusing extreme talent for sincerity not that you can't have both (Brahms.) Even Haydn in his humor and transparency is more sincere and raw than Mozart or Handel.
    Last edited by Ethereality; Aug-02-2021 at 09:10.

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    Senior Member jegreenwood's Avatar
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    I happened to stream an episode of Morse last night, which featured The Magic Flute. Do operas count?

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    Senior Member Botschaft's Avatar
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    The Hammerklavier adagio:


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    Quote Originally Posted by Ethereality View Post
    I kind of agree, though not certain Bach is the best answer either.
    I feel great sublimity and depth through the religious fervor of Bach, but I feel one thing missing from his religious expressions is "innocent piety". They often come across as someone who knows everything about the Bible, attends every church service, and can be very persuasively evangelical, and also a bit religiously "snobbish" ("I'm closer to God, so listen to what I say". <- my mother is like this actually), but at the same time all too aware and conscious of the idea that he's a sinner.
    Last edited by hammeredklavier; Aug-23-2021 at 03:00.

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