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Thread: Hi - need help rounding out a symphonic journey

  1. #76
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    Greenberg draws out the plain fact that the 2d movement is irresistibly dance-able.

    I have a theory that great music, no matter how slow or cerebral or depressive or whatever, touches upon the physically moving. I do believe music invites dance, as an axiom.

    The 2d movement is a great musical gift from Beethoven.

    I've been embarrassingly effusive with my exhortations to friends to delve into the 2d movement.

    It is so metal. It's metal af. Especially the Leinsdorf. The timpani is a headbanger's timpani. As my friend said, Beethoven's instruction to the timpanist was "beat the **** out of that thing if it looks like the audience's attention is drifting."

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    In my opinion, it would be a mistake to remove the Sibelius 5th from your list, along with his 2nd & 7th They are major symphonic works.

    --Sibelius 5, live from the Barbican, Paavo Berglund conducting the London Philharmonic:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-3-G8lCV53g
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ymZdE-lhqsE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GI4lWXyjglo

    By the way, the Sibelius 7 from Berglund's live Barbican series is one of the best recordings of a Sibelius symphony I've heard--Berglund's conducting blows me away each & every time I listen to this performance (although Segerstam is also great in his two studio recordings of the 7th, as well--see links below). Here's a link to Berglund's 4th movement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmzueCJMAVs.

    Sibelius 7, Leif Segerstam, Danish National S.O.: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fYsBvlhsEtA
    Sibelius 7, Leif Segerstam, Helsinki Philharmonic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFfeJxTnBOM

    While I'm at it, here are some recommendable performances of the Sibelius 2:

    --Sibelius 2nd, Berglund, Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=W14g...v6Q-Bo&index=9
    --Sibelius 2nd, Barbirolli, Royal Philharmonic Orchestra:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8f0MobzWzHQ
    --Sibelius 2nd, Kamu, Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Esef4RKuks

    Sibelius 1-7:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DYLNqoSwQO4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TaCS...BJ43JxEPv6Q-Bo

    You've put together an impressive and well thought out list. But I'd suggest that you consider adding some of the following symphonies,

    --Definitely add some of Haydn's London Symphonies 93-104, especially among Nos. 100-104, & possibly subtract #39. If you want to have one of Haydn's earlier symphonies on your list from his "Sturm und Drang" period, a better choice might be his No. 44 "Mourning" or No. 49 "La Passione". (Haydn's 6 "Paris" Symphonies are also essential listening, at some point, as are 6, 7, & 8, etc., etc.)

    --Sir Colin Davis, Concertgebouw Orchestra: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFz_...zq_mIFLLMC09xN
    --Frans Bruggen, Orchestra of the 18th Century, period instruments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Q8ky...kL3HR2_L0_q0pw
    --Sigiswald Kuijken, La Petite Band, period instruments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Bq-...frXhIUW86qCjSl
    --Christopher Hogwood, Academy of Ancient Music, no. 104 (& 100), period instruments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2nzYSlVHx58
    --Hogwood, AAM, this disc won a Rosette from the old Penquin Guide & deserved it: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDInc1ZF1fY
    --Leonard Bernstein, NYP, Symphony No. 104 (Bernstein made superb recordings of these symphonies in New York, for Columbia): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fxetlIVL-fI
    --Adam Fischer, Austro-Hungarian Haydn Orchestra (from Fischer's complete Haydn cycle): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rGIiuTWSxac
    --Gunther Herbig, Dresdner Philharmonia: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgtV...oHbrxGKfgtQ9sk

    #49:
    --Sir Neville Marriner, Academy of St. Martin in the Fields: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xj510OW9-IA
    --John Lubbock, Orchestra of St. John's, Smith Square, London: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mGpdeqknso4
    --Christopher Hogwood, AAM, period instruments (Trevor Pinnock's recording is good, too): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_ES5hPPc-14

    #44:
    --Sir Neville Marriner, ASMF: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HG6EbL480E4
    --Ton Koopman, Amsterdam Baroque Soloists, period instruments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E8USlX35bDE
    --Bruno Weil, Tafelmusik, period instruments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RINg...ldRUxqQv0JP_ww
    --Gary Cooper, Arion Orchestre Baroque, period instruments, 1st movement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yoxtrf7FlxI
    --Trevor Pinnock, The English Concert, period instruments, 1st movement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F2bXdNRb214

    (Btw, Pinnock has recorded all of the "Sturm und Drang" Symphonies in a box set. Here's another good collection of Haydn's "Sturm und Drang" symphonies, played on modern instruments: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BHk8_ghdsHc)

    --Definitely add Mozart's Symphonies 31 "Paris" and 38 "Prague"; as well as possibly his Nos. 35 "Haffner", & 39:

    --Hogwood, Academy of Ancient Music, period instruments, No. 31 "Paris": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lQHEZ3x4Cf8
    --Hogwood, AAM, period instruments, No. 38 "Prague": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JAV_GbylCfc
    --Bruggen, Orchestra of the 18th Century, period instruments, No. 31 "Paris", first movement: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jqeEcbSMfZI
    --Bruggen, Orchestra of the 18th Century, period instruments, No. 35 "Haffner": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDdwBgX4SRA
    --Pinnock, The English Concert, period instruments, No. 38 "Prague": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2XJQ1Meuatw
    ETC.
    --Otmar Suitner, Staatskapelle Dresden, No. 39 (although Sir Colin Davis & Herbert Blomstedt are also excellent in their recordings with the Staatskapelle Dresdem, and they're digitally recorded, unlike Suitner): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqKIrOcxBkY

    Btw, here are two great Mozart orchestras, who play on modern instruments:

    --Camerata Academica des Mozarteums Salzburg, Sandor Vegh (or under Hans Graf): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3f3SlyWc5c
    --Staatskapelle Dresden, Herbert Blomstedt (or under Sir Colin Davis, or Otmar Suitner): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M_otGr-y_SU
    https://www.amazon.com/Symphonies-38...s=music&sr=1-1

    --Consider adding Beethoven's 1st, 2nd, & 4th. By the way, Beethoven considered his more classical 8th to be a better symphony than his 7th. I don't agree, but the 8th is well worth considering. Yet, IMO, it's best to (at some point) listen to Beethoven's 9 Symphonies in the order in which they were composed, since they map out an autobiographical & spiritual journey on the composer's part (much like his Early, Middle, & Late String Quartets). Therefore, it may be best to listen to Beethoven's symphonies as a separate project.

    #1: Kurt Masur, Leipzig Gewanhaus Orchestra (& on period instruments, Hogwood is excellent): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ySLW8D6V7fM
    #2 (composed during the time of the Heiligenstadt testament, when Beethoven first learned that he was going deaf & would lose his hearing eventually: which caused him to contemplate suicide, yet he changed his mind, & all that is in this dark/light symphony, IMO):
    --Nikolaus Harnoncourt, Chamber Orchestra of Europe:https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4YpS...PxiVEv&index=5
    --Rafael Kubelik, Concertgebouw Orchestra: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0eAMU7k7UhM
    #4:
    --Paul Kletzki, Czech Philharmonic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HYNEorug-kY
    --Masur, Leipzig: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rk-_dv8PIHU

    By the way, for Beethoven's very difficult to conduct (well) "Eroica", with its massive 1st movement (where conductors have been known to lose their way in concert), I'd strongly recommend that you try to hear the Hermann Scherchen, Leonard Bernstein (on Columbia/Sony), and Paul van Kempen recordings, because they're simply better than most others, IMO:

    Scherchen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TinMwzbsMlY
    Bernstein: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0AQ4ATAvAcU
    Kempen: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wP8WSB_ycjA

    --Consider adding Mahler 1st, 4th, 5th, & 7th "Song of the Night" & unfinished 10th. Mahler's Das Lied von der Erde, or The Song of the Earth, is also essentially a symphony.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2MEPXBG7JDs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yu1jnkv5z10
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DQ7FW4fly9Y

    --Consider adding Schumann's 1st, 3rd "Rhenish", & 4th:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=je7o...S2kipSXm34YlR_
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M27K3zxmIKo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9hgCaboe0c

    --Consider adding Bruckner's 5th & 6th, though you are right to begin with his 4, 7, 8 & 9.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=txQewxJBGg0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6J4IDfajZHw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WUz9YHcbWPE

    --If you're going to include Strauss' tone poem, "Also Sprach Zarathustra", you might also consider Debussy's "La Mer" & perhaps "Trois Nocturnes", Ravel's "Daphnis et Chloe", Rimsky-Korsakov's "Schererazade", Stravinsky's "The Firebird" and "The Rite of Spring", & Sibelius' tone poem, "Tapiola"--which are all very important & rewarding orchestral works.

    Debussy:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5iahorb5PPE
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bdlGEKoAUGw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2ywJierXC0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5Y0RjeEamjI

    Ravel:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YHrstmOPKBQ

    Rimsky-Korsakov: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=b3O3Q5qae_I

    Stravinsky:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Si6fn8x1aVA
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j6MN...HAWzbThVpeJxR4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BFEU...t8d8rvDDhuu1VI
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XSKr...NaZYX5&index=2

    Sibelius:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MUaH61AICLY
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yy0_zqEOp4A

    Your following choices are good picks, but I'm not as keen on them as any of the above suggestions,

    Gorecki #3
    Copland #3
    Franck Symphony
    Gliere #3
    Borodin #2
    Rachmaninov #2
    Tchaikovsky #4

    Though I admit they do give your list more variety.

    Here are some other picks to consider among the standard symphonic repertoire (at some point, if not presently):

    --Prokofiev 1st, 3rd, 5th, 7th:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S3R_NBfO9Nw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MlvStcZvqrs
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qguNqx8DdOQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Rh0ud5pS3zo
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tlRLdsniDCQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=553P...XPh736nMYBBrFw

    --Saint-Saëns, Symphony No. 3 "Organ Symphony":
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JfyFNyApuhM
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qAojGKF0esI

    --Brahms 3rd: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tUeYcq1d0DA
    --Mendelssohn 3rd, 5th: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mo_1CdiehDI
    --Martinu 5th, 6th "Fantaisies Symphoniques": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6NxX...EQpE8&index=19

    More off the beaten path, & not suggested for your top 50, but well worth hearing at a later time, perhaps:

    Important French (& Swiss) symphonists:

    --Koechlin "The Seven Stars' Symphony": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YW-1uigZ-14
    --Saint-Saens 1-5:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4wM...0JLA61yZsDmFFL
    --Magnard 1-4:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SDwfH5EsicA
    --Roussel 1-4:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=00n4z_AuLiI
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mtw1s1VlqKQ
    --Honegger 1-5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I3hV...4Uc6YQ_eDlM2Aw
    --Ropartz 1-5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fvhT8JKzrko
    --Messiaen:
    Turangalila Symphonie: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ABHU...3PXotFV8VqB0Bo
    Des canyons aux etoiles: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5DjgpPL7RhA
    --Dutilleux, Symphonies 1 & 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f1DhzDiNji0

    Important Scandinavian Symphonic composers:

    --Holmboe 8th "Sinfonia borealis": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iGliW2I04yo
    --Kokkonen 1-4:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PK0e...XADP8VYFeJeCLk
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BGXA...pNKHuY&index=6
    --Kaipainen #2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eOM6...GI_j9nXjYoCvVA
    --Merikanto 1-3:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2pUXoN4fxoQ
    --Pettersson:
    Symphony No. 7: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nV8RyLn_da8
    Symphony No. 4: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J9C0UPlAQWs
    --Valen 1-4:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oi-zeoTezz4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZWd_AW0RGtU
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ebiawpQCWYw
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lx7TWogGvFg
    --Rautavaara 7 "Angel of Light", 8 "The Journey":
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aRa6-wRU7T4
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svgwpfqvuIY
    --Nørgård 1-6 (in progress cycle):
    Symphony No. 6 "At the End of the Day": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AxTkhLj0bkY
    Symphony No. 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RY0F8D6lIkA
    --Vuori 1, 2 (in progress cycle):
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Goz1J91TVPQ
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t87jUtJEPHc

    Other Scandinavian & Baltic region symphonists of note: Paavo Heininen, Einar Englund, Kurt Atterburg, Eduard Tubin, Erkki Melartin, Ib Nørholm, Leif Segerstam, Erkki-Sven Tüür, and Arvo Pärt. Magnus Lindberg should be on this list, but I don't think he's written a symphony to date. Neither has Anders Hillborg, or Esa-Pekka Salonen. There's also the symphonies of Rued Langgaard to consider; however, personally, I've not liked any of Langgaard's symphonies as much as his brilliant "Music of the Spheres": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-GixaHxgwYc.

    Some other important symphonic composers:

    --Persichetti 9th "Janiculum": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s9scmoqkemM
    --Lutoslawski 1-4:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k0aJHZ7LBMc
    --Knussen 2nd, 3rd:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nIKhAdj3tb0
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gnol0WRWt6A

    Lastly, at some point in the distant future, you also might consider exploring the symphonies by American composers, such as Walter Piston, William Schumann, George Rochberg, Roger Sessions, John Harbison, Charles Ives, Roy Harris, Howard Hanson, Samuel Barber, Christopher Rouse, Peter Mennin, Paul Creston, Aaron Copland, Ned Rorem, Vincent Persichetti (in addition to his 9th mentioned above), Tobias Picker, & Alan Hovhaness, etc.

    Hope all that helps.

    P.S. If you want any more recommendations for recordings of a specific symphony, just ask, & I'd be happy to make some further suggestions. Of course, my above post isn't meant to be explored all at once, but over time, at your leisure.
    Last edited by Josquin13; Sep-09-2021 at 22:07.

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    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    ^ what Jos said.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Josquin13 View Post
    Hope all that helps.
    Wow! Thank you!



    I have put a lot of thought into it, even if it looks arbitrary or devoid of pattern from the outside.

    My current list has some changes that conform, on the whole, with your suggestions.

    It is challenging to keep it to 50, but I want to take a deep, deep dive with each of these. In the past I've listened only a few times, but this time I want to listen (and relisten) to each one with deliberation until it fully reveals itself.

    I think I have a really good metaphor for what I'm trying to accomplish here. But I'm going to need a whiteboard.

    symphony diagram.jpg

    Imagine all the symphonies that exist--that's the universe that I want to explore. On the boundary of this set of compositions are those works that straddle the definition of 'symphony'.

    Within this universe of the set of all symphonic compositions, let's partition each member of that set--each symphony--so that it belongs to one of three groups: 1) what I love (red); 2) stuff most people tend to like but I don't (green); 3) other symphonies.

    It's an over-simplification.

    My goal is to find all the red, especially the reddest red.

    Each symphony I choose on this list of 50 has traits and attributes that are archetypal to the entire universe. So it's not just that I'm listening to one of approximately a million symphonies, but rather that I'm exploring all similar symphonies--all symphonies with comparable traits.

    I'm not sure what those traits are, I know I'm getting awfully abstract, but I hope this helps. Some examples of traits might be composer, era, instruments used, thematic rigidity, nationality, popularity...

    So the goal is truly exploration with these 50. It's like one of those video games with an unrevealed map (Civ, anyone?) that you need to scout.

    I think I made a big mess of that metaphor.

    To say it differently: I will always have time to go back and listen to Beethoven's 8th, but for now I want to discover the types of symphonic composition that are especially personally rewarding.

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    Btw, based on my love of Beethoven's Op. 109 and even this conflicted two-week fling with his 9th Symphony, I feel almost certain that I will, in the long run, God willing, end up taking a deep dive into all 9 of his symphonies. Then again, I also need to full explore the quartets. And I am only 30% through his piano sonatas, which are probably my favorite of his compositional types.
    Last edited by hawgdriver; Sep-10-2021 at 03:25.

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    It has been two weeks with Beethoven's 9th, and I could easily spend another week or more with it. I still have a long ways to go with unpacking the 4th movement.

    I considered taking another week with this one. But I'm going to rotate into the percolator. I am addicted to the 2d movement, but that's not saying much. It's easy to love.

    I really enjoy the first and third movements. I am beginning to like the 4th movement on one level, but that level isn't altogether the same as liking to listen to it. There are parts of the 4th that I love: the dissonant arrival of a dominant subject and rejection of prior thematic 'answers', the instrumental development prior to the choral section, and the mass-like section (oratorio?). Other parts are also becoming more pleasing.

    But it is time for Suk's Asrael.

    I would expect that Beethoven's 9th will be one of the good/great symphonies from 10-40. I understand why some believe it to be the greatest or one of the greatest, I'm just not there yet. Maybe never, but for now I cannot say.
    Last edited by hawgdriver; Sep-13-2021 at 02:40.

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    Senior Member Merl's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawgdriver View Post

    But it is time for Suk's Asrael.

    I would expect that Beethoven's 9th will be one of the good/great symphonies from 10-40. I understand why some believe it to be the greatest or one of the greatest, I'm just not there yet. Maybe never, but for now I cannot say.
    If you found Beethoven's 9th difficult I'm looking forward to your opinion of Asrael.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hawgdriver View Post
    I would expect that Beethoven's 9th will be one of the good/great symphonies from 10-40. I understand why some believe it to be the greatest or one of the greatest, I'm just not there yet. Maybe never, but for now I cannot say.
    In my opinion Beethoven's Ninth is the least accessible, although arguably the greatest, of his symphonies, particulary in it's sui generis fourth movement. It's his last and most complex work in the genre, but I think that to begin in Beethoven it's better to hear first his third, fifth, sixth and seventh symphonies, that are much more approachable works that can be assimilated in much less time, and are all very rewarding to the listener nonetheless.

    If you decide to move on with your project of listening to all Beethoven symphonies, I suggest you to hear the first eight before tackling the Choral again.
    Last edited by Xisten267; Sep-14-2021 at 21:01.

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    While I also recommended above to listen to a selection of earlier Beethoven symphonies first, I don't think the 9th is hard to approach. The first 3 symphonies I got to know were the 3rd, 6th and 9th. Obviously, the Pastoral was the easiest to get but I never had a problem with the 9th or the finale, except sheer length. Back then as a teenager I dubbed the LP on cassette tape and would sometimes listen only to one half of a symphony, no easy skipping like on digital media but one side only was easy. I still think that the Eroica first and slow movements can be a bit harder than the ones from the 9th.
    And the finale is long but I found it far easier to follow because of the famous melody and the choir than a 20+ min. finale by Bruckner or Mahler or Siegfried Idyll or longish Liszt or Strauss tone poem or whatever. (And all these other pieces also seem to work very well for many people on an "emotional", certainly not analytical approach.)

    I even found most Beethoven's late string quartets easier than his early and middle quartets, with only a few movements (like op.133) being exceptions.

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    It's hard to assimilate an entire 70 minute work of such creative density, period! For me anyways. I wanted to spend another week because the 4th movement was starting to grow on me--not that I thought I would necessarily fall in love with it--but it had a certain narrative flow that was beginning to seem rational.

    Was it a mistake to place it so early instead of later? It's clearly a difficult work to parse for someone like me in such a short time. But I actually don't feel it was time misspent, because as I go back and relisten, I think it will have sunk in a bit more, and it will offer some benchmark qualities. What Beethoven did was complex and ambitious...a bit cerebral, but in an everyman sort of way. And the instrumental 75+% is simply gorgeous.

    It gives me more time to 'get it'.

    For now, I've been through Suk's Asrael three times and I am very glad it's on the list. It really works for me. 'Addiction', as it were, I'm not sure when and if that will happen, because there is a certain angularity that is slightly difficult. But it's not an obnoxious kind of angularity, it's quite seemly. It also has a kind of grand feel to it that appeals.

    I want more hours in the day.

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    ^^^ Asrael is one of my favourite pieces of all. Whose recording are you listening to?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kreisler jr View Post
    And the finale is long but I found it far easier to follow because of the famous melody and the choir than a 20+ min. finale by Bruckner or Mahler or Siegfried Idyll or longish Liszt or Strauss tone poem or whatever. (And all these other pieces also seem to work very well for many people on an "emotional", certainly not analytical approach.)
    I agree with this. Beethoven has a strong sense of inevitability, especially in his most famous works.
    Last edited by hammeredklavier; Sep-16-2021 at 20:31.

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    Quote Originally Posted by CnC Bartok View Post
    ^^^ Asrael is one of my favourite pieces of all. Whose recording are you listening to?
    Mackerras and Ashkenazy. Do you have some favorites? I need a few more.

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    Quote Originally Posted by hawgdriver View Post
    Mackerras and Ashkenazy. Do you have some favorites? I need a few more.
    Czech Philharmonic Orchestra under Vaclav Neumann on a Supraphon CD.

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    Senior Member CnC Bartok's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hawgdriver View Post
    Mackerras and Ashkenazy. Do you have some favorites? I need a few more.
    Mackerras is one of the very very best. If you can find them, Ancerl is wonderful, Talich is draining (in a good way! It's heart-wrenching!) But for me the best is probably Rafael Kubelik with the Bavarian Radio.

    The latter is very hard to find these days, which is a real shame.

    You could also try any one of the three recordings made by Jiří Bělohlávek, on Chandos, Supraphon and Decca, in that order. Swings and roundabouts as to the best one, but I have a slight preference for the middle one, coupled with Britten's Sinfonia da Requiem. Art Rock's Neumann recommendation is an excellent one as well. I haven't properly absorbed the two Czech newbies' recordings, Jakub Hrůša, and Tomáš Netopil, yet.

    I'll be frank, and say I don't actually have a poor Asrael........even the least obvious candidates - Weller, Ashkenazy, Petrenko - are each recommendable in their own way. My least favourite is Libor Pešek, who tends to over-dramatise certain aspects....
    Last edited by CnC Bartok; Sep-16-2021 at 22:51.

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