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Thread: sad songs

  1. #1
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    Exclamation sad songs

    Hi, I'm 20 years old and I just discovered that I actually enjoy listening to classical music. I'm particularly interested in sad classical music more specifically piano pieces. I have Fur Elise and Moonlight Sonata by Beethoven which I think are amazing. Basically, if someone could point me in the right direction with a list of similar songs it would be greatly appreciated. I also have Mozart's Requiem and Tchaikovsky's Finale Ultimo which I also greatly enjoy. Thanks for any help.

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    Well, You certainly have discovered classical music through some of the best paths. I share your enjoyment of 'sad' classical music, especially when i'm already angry!

    I was given a CD as a present a few years ago, because I don't know where in the world you live, I am unable to tell you whether you would find it in the shops. The CD is titled "REQUIEM: Some of the most moving music in the world" It is a 3 Disk compilation of everything from Tavener (Renaissaince composer) to The Gladiator soundtrack. The Collection of music really opened my eyes to the styles of different composers and encouraged me to purchase more CD's of certain composers.

    I terms of pieces, I can congratulate you on your choice of Mozarts Requiem, If you enjoy that then Mozarts Mass in C minor, especially the Kyrie (First Movement) Is especially good. If you decide to venture towards the Baroque era, Bachs Violin concerto in A minor and his double violin concerto in D minor are also full of anger and sorrow. As are some movements of the well known 'Four Seasons' by Vivaldi

    You Mentioned piano music is your prefered choice, even though i am not well informed of sad piano music, i am aware of some pieces that may interest you. A reasonably famous piece is Chopin's Post-humous Nocturne in C# minor (that track is on the requiem Cd). My orchestra is also playing Shostakovich's 2nd Piano concerto which includes a very moving and emotional 2nd movement. Some people may tell you that Shostakovich is very hard to listen to and takes a fine musical ear to appreciate but the 2nd movement of his 2nd piano concerto in F literally contradicts the atonal and 'hard-to-bear' style seen in his symphonies.

    I hope this information is of use to you and I sincerly hope that you explore wider areas of classical music, eventually learning to appreciate its beauty in each era and form.

    If you require more information, please don't hesitate to post on here again, I keep a close eye on this forum so a reply shouldn't take too long!

  3. #3
    Senior Member Edward Elgar's Avatar
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    Haydn makes some valid comments here - but may I post some of my fav sad peices:

    Brahms - 3rd movement of 3rd Symphony
    Shozzy's 2nd piano concerto - 2nd movement
    Allegri's Miserere
    The Lark Ascending (not really sad, but deeply spiritual)
    Rachmaninov's 2nd piano concerto
    Dvoraks cello concerto
    Whelan's Celtic Romance

    Don't get all emo with the sad tunes - you need a very varied collection to fully apreciate the wonders of classical music!
    When all the paint has been dried, when all the stone has been carved, music shall remain, and we shall work with what remains.

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    Junior Member Weltschmerz's Avatar
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    Mahler's Adagietto (4th movement from 5th symphony) is the most sad and most beatiful piece of music I have ever heard, which is saying something. I would reccomend going out right now and buying the Wiener Philharmoniker recording of the fifth symphony under Leonard Bernstein. He takes the adagietto movement about 4 minutes slower than the mainstream conductors like Karajan or Muti, and that is part of what makes it beautiful. This piece of music has had an effect on me in a way that I can not explain to you in words. You need to just listen to it. Everything else you could be doing is trivial in comparison.

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