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Thread: The Passing of Bernard Haitink

  1. #31
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mbhaub View Post
    Even though most of his recordings have been released on CD, often multiple times, here's a complete Philips set that would be most welcome (and very, very heavy and expensive).
    Philips (er, Decca) already issued a lot of this material in this set (Beethoven, Bruckner, Mahler, Brahms, Tchaikovsky, Schumann); I'm glad that I snapped it up when it was still available and affordable:

    haitink.jpg
    Last edited by wkasimer; Oct-22-2021 at 15:38.

  2. #32
    Senior Member wkasimer's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rogerx View Post


    For me personal these are one of his best, what you see is what you get.
    I have the CD version of this set, and it's some of Haitink's best Mahler.

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  4. #33
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    The idea of "greats" tends to apply to those who've been around long enough to gain the title.

    Toscanini was considered one of the greatest ever in his 20s. Yet there are plenty of conductors that recorded and were known for many years and/or decades that did not earn such title. Edouard van Remoortel is one.

    Some people say same about many of today's leading lights such as John Gardiner and Roger Norrington. Kurt Masur also went a lifetime at high profile orchestras without such accolades.

    Haitink's gifts and abilities became known at a young age when he was projected with the likes of Colin Davis, Zubin Mehta, Lorin Maazel and others in the 1960s to lead the next generation of conductors. Whatever you choose to say about them you cannot deny they all reached a very high level of regard and all had top flight orchestral posts, among benchmarks often thought of as keys to greatness.
    Last edited by larold; Oct-22-2021 at 15:49.

  5. #34
    Senior Member SONNET CLV's Avatar
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    My Discogs catalog currently gives me 35 hits for Haitink, including his Rachmaninoff concerti with Ashkenazy, all favorites of mine, and a Beethoven "Emperor" with the Concertgebouw-Orchester and pianist Claudio Arrau. As well there are readings of symphonies by Shostakovich, Mahler, Brahms, Vaughan Williams, the complete box set of Bruckner and all four by Schumann, all recordings which regularly spin on my stereo. Too, I see Debussy, a Rite of Spring, and several other 20th century works, the most unusual of which may be the vinyl disc featuring Symphony No. 2 by Peter Schat with Haitink leading the Concertgebouw Orchestra on the label Composers' Voice – CVS 1986/1. Or maybe it's the Musica Sinfonica, Op. 93 For Orchestra [1967] by Lex van Delden (Haitink leading the Royal Concertgebouw) in a 10-CD box set of Dutch composers titled Forbidden Music In World War II on the label Etcetera – KTC 1530.

    Among this listing of 35 are a number of box sets including the 7 CD compilation titled The Art Of Bernard Haitink on Decca – 478 1429.

    Ap-1.jpg

    Ap-2.jpg

    It is to this collection that I today will turn to honor the late conductor and his music. There are plenty of great recordings (and music) in the set to choose from.

    I think I'll start with the Richard Strauss piece: Tod Und Verklärung. Something tells me that is fitting for the occasion.
    Last edited by SONNET CLV; Oct-22-2021 at 17:56.

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  7. #35
    Senior Member mbhaub's Avatar
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    Too often we label a conductor "great" from the perspective of listeners and record collectors. What's more important is the conductor as seen by the orchestras he conducts. In that sense, Haitink was a great, really great, conductor. His knowledge of the music and his vast experience gave him an authority that eludes so many younger conductors who don't seem to care about the depth of their understanding. There are some guys (and gals) out there today who are quite fine, but given the state of classical these days most people will never know much about them. Tugan Sokhiev, Edward Gardner, Fabio Luisi, Robin Ticciati...superb conductors.
    "It is surprising how easily one can become used to bad music" - F. Mendelssohn

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  9. #36
    Senior Member Forster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon23 View Post
    It's fine, I clarified only because of the quotes (new "greats").
    [etc]
    Quote Originally Posted by larold View Post
    The idea of "greats" tends to apply to those who've been around long enough to gain the title.

    [etc]
    Quote Originally Posted by mbhaub View Post
    Too often we label a conductor "great" [etc]
    In order not to risk disfiguring this tribute to Haitink thread, I started a separate discussion about 'great' conductors.

    "Great" conductors?

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  11. #37
    Senior Member Brahmsian Colors's Avatar
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    He was a master of clarity and orchestral detail though I sometimes wished for a bit more emotional involvement from him. I particularly liked his Vaughan Williams Symphonies 3 and 5 with the London Philharmonic and his Mahler Third, Bruckner Ninth and Orchestral Debussy wiith the Amsterdam (Royal) Concertgebouw.

  12. #38
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    If you want emotional engagement try this; one of the greatest 8ths I know. One of the great works in cover art too.

    shost 8.jpg
    Last edited by larold; Oct-22-2021 at 17:57.

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  14. #39
    Senior Member starthrower's Avatar
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    RIP Maestro Haitink

    Too often we label a conductor "great" from the perspective of listeners and record collectors. What's more important is the conductor as seen by the orchestras he conducts. In that sense, Haitink was a great, really great, conductor. His knowledge of the music and his vast experience gave him an authority that eludes so many younger conductors who don't seem to care about the depth of their understanding.
    Interestingly enough, Riccardo Muti mentioned the same thing in a 1999 interview I found on YouTube yesterday.
    In Mahler I usually prefer the Solti approach -caveman having a seisure whips orchestra into a frenzy!! - Radames, TC member

  15. #40
    Senior Member RobertJTh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by larold View Post
    If you want emotional engagement try this; one of the greatest 8ths I know. One of the great works in cover art too.
    I agree about the performance, but I fail to be impressed by communist agitprop.

  16. #41
    Senior Member Brahmsian Colors's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by larold View Post
    If you want emotional engagement try this; one of the greatest 8ths I know. One of the great works in cover art too.

    shost 8.jpg

    I had indeed forgotten about Haitink's superb account of the composer's Eighth---certainly a riveting one. I do still own it, as well as the conductor's Fourth and Seventh, which had been my favorite works of the composer. At present though, it's difficult to say whether or not my taste for Shostakovich will ever be renewed.

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    71jG0-m+dcL._SL1200_.jpg

    My first Bruckner symphony cycle. Still one of my favourites. Dramatic, lively and energetic.
    4035719007169-8455-0600px-001-1_600x600.jpg

    Also a great fifth with an amazing adagio.

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  19. #43
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    Quote Originally Posted by RobertJTh View Post
    I agree about the performance, but I fail to be impressed by communist agitprop.
    It's become a cliché but I find those soviet poster covers quite fitting. Whereas I can be mildly irritated by Bach cantatas with 15th century paintings as covers. For some reason, Bach rarely gets roughly contemporary paintings, it's usually 200 years earlier art.
    FWIW it means "(Go) ahead! Victory is near!

  20. #44
    Senior Member RobertJTh's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kreisler jr View Post
    It's become a cliché but I find those soviet poster covers quite fitting.
    Well, there's my problem: I don't think this particular cover is fitting at all. Its mood, its purpose, it's the polar opposite of what Shostakovich' 8th really is. Just because the symphony was written during WWII doesn't mean that it's all about the banal, ugly reality of war. Shostakovich covered that already with the 7th, a very banal, ugly symphony (don't hit me). The 8th is an inwards journey, at most it reflects on the prevalent mood of the times. It doesn't even end in anything remotely resembling "victory", it's got the same kind of eerie, doubtful, exhausted "death clock" ending as the 4th and 15th.
    Shostakovich' 7th, 8th and 9th got programmed recently as a "war symphony" trilogy. That's a really contemptible way of narrowing down the message of these works and make them digestible for the Star Wars generation. They did the same with Prokofiev's late piano sonatas. Utterly stupid.

  21. #45
    Senior Member hammeredklavier's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Azol View Post
    I never could understand Hurwitz bashing the RVW boxset, it's a very balanced and fine cycle.
    Hurwitz bashes everything

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