Results 1 to 3 of 3

Thread: Being The First Time Hearing Cherubini’s MEDEE

  1. #1
    Senior Member MAS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,101
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Being The First Time Hearing Cherubini’s MEDEE

    As this recording appeared on my queue for YouTube, and I liked the thumbnail bas-relief, I took the time to listen, having only heard the Italian version with the Lachner recitatives in the Callas recordings.

    I much prefer the bastardized Italian version with the recitatives, and found it a strange experience hearing the original French spoken dialog plus sudden familiar music with unfamiliar lyrics.
    And it has, of course more music than I’d heard before as it must be more complete!

    But it was a good experience though the singing is just OK and the dialog stilted at times.









    I own NOTHING!
    Last edited by MAS; Oct-26-2021 at 04:51.

  2. Likes Tsaraslondon, Meyerbeer Smith liked this post
  3. #2
    Senior Member Meyerbeer Smith's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2016
    Posts
    2,136
    Post Thanks / Like
    Blog Entries
    5

    Default

    That's the Folse recording, in French, but without French singers? It gives an idea of the work, but leaves much to be desired. Médée is a French tragédie lyrique, so needs singers who can pronounce French, and act in it, too!

    But finding a good recording of Médée / Medea is difficult. Maria Callas is superb, but sang an Italian translation of Franz Lachner’s German version, with ponderous recitatives replacing the spoken dialogue.

    Ralph Moore has an excellent discographical survey: http://www.musicweb-international.co...dea_survey.pdf.

    I listened to a few of Cherubini's operas a couple of years ago, and was impressed. Démophoon, his first French opera, is rather dull, and the only recording - Rome 1985 - is poor quality, and features a wooden Caballé and G. Taddei. But Lodoïska is faster-paced, more action-driven, and more exciting than almost anything in opera hitherto; it's the first Romantic opera, and the foundation of the 19th century French school.

    Cherubini certainly deserves more renown! Beethoven (BEETHOVEN!), no less, considered him the greatest living composer of his time. Schumann ("the foremost among living artists"), Mendelssohn ("The first three bars of the overture to Les deux journées are worth more than our entire repertoire"), Wagner ("the greatest of musical architects"), and Brahms ("Médee is the highest dramatic art") all praised him. And the 19th century musicologist Alexander Ulybyshev considered Cherubini “the musician who, after Mozart, has exerted the greatest general influence on the tendency of the art… Cherubini strikes me as being the most accomplished musician, if not the greatest genius, of the nineteenth century.”

  4. #3
    Senior Member MAS's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    San Francisco
    Posts
    2,101
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Meyerbeer Smith View Post
    That's the Folse recording, in French, but without French singers? It gives an idea of the work, but leaves much to be desired. Médée is a French tragédie lyrique, so needs singers who can pronounce French, and act in it, too!

    But finding a good recording of Médée / Medea is difficult. Maria Callas is superb, but sang an Italian translation of Franz Lachner’s German version, with ponderous recitatives replacing the spoken dialogue.

    Ralph Moore has an excellent discographical survey: http://www.musicweb-international.co...dea_survey.pdf.

    I listened to a few of Cherubini's operas a couple of years ago, and was impressed. Démophoon, his first French opera, is rather dull, and the only recording - Rome 1985 - is poor quality, and features a wooden Caballé and G. Taddei. But Lodoïska is faster-paced, more action-driven, and more exciting than almost anything in opera hitherto; it's the first Romantic opera, and the foundation of the 19th century French school.

    Cherubini certainly deserves more renown! Beethoven (BEETHOVEN!), no less, considered him the greatest living composer of his time. Schumann ("the foremost among living artists"), Mendelssohn ("The first three bars of the overture to Les deux journées are worth more than our entire repertoire"), Wagner ("the greatest of musical architects"), and Brahms ("Médee is the highest dramatic art") all praised him. And the 19th century musicologist Alexander Ulybyshev considered Cherubini “the musician who, after Mozart, has exerted the greatest general influence on the tendency of the art… Cherubini strikes me as being the most accomplished musician, if not the greatest genius, of the nineteenth century.”
    I like the Italian version better than this and I don’t find the Lachner recitatives ponderous, on the contrary Callas makes them live, unlike the singers in this recording - the declaimed French is what makes this unattractive to me.

  5. Likes Tsaraslondon, niknik liked this post

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •