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Thread: How is classical music recorded?

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    Default How is classical music recorded?

    How do they record classical music? is it all done live or do they do it in a recording studio ?

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    Hi Steve,

    Both are just as common as each other and both have their pro's and con. Film and TV classical recordings are generally done in studios, such as Angel Studios. For pop, its usually done in studios but on a smaller scale and doubled or even tripled. Classical recordings for sale by London Philharmonic or someone might be done live so that they can record it in the sorts of venues that are designed to make the ensembles sound good. Both can be great.
    Sonny

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    PINNA Productions
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    "MOST" classical is recorded with mikes hanging from the ceiling either in a studio or in a live concert hall. What you will notice the most in comparison to pop recordings is the lack of dynamic compression in classical music recordings.
    Most all pop music is compressed so that the loudest parts and the softest parts are closer together. So it sounds good on the radio and in your car. You will find that in order to hear the quiet passages in a classical recording the louder parts will be very loud. This gives a much more life-like sound when played on a good quality stereo.
    Pop recordings will almost alway be recorded at a louder level overall. Example..
    I have a very nice tube headphone amp here at work that I listen to every day. If I leave the volume knob at the position I use for 90% of my classical music and stick in a pop cd it will blast me out of my chair!
    Also, pop recordings will tend to sound better on poor stereos than classical will. Classical music needs quality equipment to get the most out of it. You need an amplifier that has a boatload of PRAT (pace, rythym and timing) and good dynamic range and response to bring the music to life.
    Pop recording with their overly rich artificial sound will sound fine on cheaper equipment where as a classical recording will tend to sound kinda lifeless.
    If you can't tell I'm a stereo freak

    Nothing beats a great classical recording on a tube amp with a high quality pair of headphones

    jeff

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