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Thread: Orchestral Transcriptions / Orchestrations

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    Maurice Ravel - Jeux d'eau (orchestral version by C. Viacava)
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fm9mGsnEyCQ


    Ravel: La vallée des cloches [arr. Percy Grainger]
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MkL4xGxXamc


    Bach-Wood 'Prelude in E' - Litton conducts
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=53qGpWy_8aw
    Sir Henry Wood orchestrated six short pieces by Bach and combined them into what he called "Suite No. 6 for Full Orchestra." This was a kind of follow-up to Bach's own Orchestral Suites and also a "Suite No. 5 for Strings" that Wood had created out of the composer's organ sonatas. The Finale of the "Suite No. 6" is the 'Prelude' from the Partita No. 3 for Solo Violin. It was played at the 2010 BBC Proms by the Royal Philharmonic under Andrew Litton in a concert devoted entirely to Bach Transcriptions.





    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9O-ouMkw1mY
    Felix Mottl arranged several delightful orchestral suites from the stage works of 18th century composers, including Gretry's 'Céphale et Procris,' a 'ballet-heroique' based on an ancient Greek legend and first performed in 1773. From an RCA LP made in the 1970s by the Sydney Symphony Orchestra under Robert Pikler we hear two numbers, a Tambourin and a Gigue





    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QWh_17hpsRM
    From a 1950s Andre Kostelanetz LP devoted to his own orchestrations of Chopin's piano music, we hear the 'Raindrop' Prelude, Opus 28 No. 15. The sleeve-note tells the story that the composer, ill and feverish while on holiday in Majorca, listened to the rain falling outside, imagining that one day it would be beating on his coffin. It is this image, according to his girlfriend George Sand, that he sought to express in this music




    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1G-wp49hajA
    This music comes from Mussorgsky's music-drama 'Khovantchina' evoking Russian political life at the end of the 17th century. Stokowski's orchestration of the Act 4 Entr'acte is more vividly scored than Rimsky-Korsakov's and depicts Prince Galitsin being led into exile. This track comes from a 'Stokowski Spectacular' CD made for Pye-Nixa with the National Philharmonic in 1975 when the Maestro was 93 years old.





    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gdX2DmzWMoY
    One of Beethoven's most popular piano pieces is here played by the Philadelphia Orchestra, conductor Eugene Ormandy, in an arrangement made by his assistant conductor at the time, William Smith.




    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oR2OQkyWzk8
    This number was one of the biggest hits of British song-writer Tolchard Evans, in particular being an international best-seller for Eddie Fisher in the 1950s. Here it is in a typically vivacious orchestral arrangement by Carmen Dragon from a 1950s Capitol 'Full Dimensional Stereo Sound' LP. The lyrics have been added for anyone who wishes to sing along. This upload is dedicated to a close relative living in Spain. I hope she enjoys it!




    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pvJB0ziqCeE
    Sir Thomas Beecham made a number of arrangements of Handel's music that included a 45-minute 'Balletic Entertainment' entitled "Love in Bath." During his last visit to America in late 1959, he conducted a number of great US orchestras, including the Chicago Symphony. From a televised concert with them comes a Suite from "Love in Bath" which concludes with a dashing 'Hornpipe' and a flourish of 'Rule Britannia' that was Beecham's own idea. This video is an example of very early colour TV recording, so is not up to today's standards.





    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CNP6FIJ_3fI
    Stokowski orchestrated some of Schubert's 'German Dances' for Piano, Opus 33, quite early in his career, having recorded them on an acoustic 78rpm disc in 1923. On that recording they were entitled 'Viennese Dances' but for his 1949 remake they became 'Tyrolean Dances.' Here's that 1949 recording, made with an 'ad hoc' Symphony Orchestra selected from the NBC Symphony, New York Philharmonic and freelance session pool.





    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f33tZSMdxkE
    "Andaluza" is the fifth of the twelve 'Danzas Espanolas' that Enrique Granados wrote for solo piano between 1892 and 1900. We hear it in the orchestration by Ricard Lamote de Grignon, another Spanish composer, in a 1958 recording made by Artur Rodzinski and the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra.

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    These symphonies were done well by someone:ELGAR symphony 3,SCHUBERT symphonies 7+10,TCHAIKOVSKY e-flat symphony

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    Senior Member spradlig's Avatar
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    In general I don't care for transcriptions, but a lot of Debussy's piano music (Petite Suite, Danse, etc.) has been transcribed well for orchestra, by Ravel, Andre Caplet, and perhaps Debussy himself, and I like the transcriptions I have heard.

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    I like the Children's Corner, transcribed by Andre Caplet, and Ravel's transcription of Pictures at an Exhibition by Mussorgsky, but that's pretty much all I've heard.
    Unless you want LSO transcriptions, which I know quite a few of . . .
    "I won't ever throw rose petals out my car window."
    --Paraphrased from The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

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    http://www.deutschegrammophon.com/en/cat/4791074
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlKH6WQedco




    http://www.musicweb-international.co...es_8573016.htm
    http://www.musicweb-international.co...es_NBD0036.htm


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EXs3NE6DxyM
    For his first CD, the Philadelphia Orchestra's new conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin pays a splendid tribute to Leopold Stokowski with several 'Stokowski Transcriptions'. Also on the CD is a terrific performance of Stravinsky's 'Rite of Spring,' a 20th-century masterwork which Stokowski introduced to America in the 1920s. Here's Stokowski's own personal tribute to the great Russian composer: a 'Song without Words' originally written for soprano and piano, here arranged by the great Maestro for woodwinds and strings.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kyyS07ZjDoM
    One of Rachmaninoff's most famous Preludes is here orchestrated by Andre Kostelanetz. It comes from an old LP of the composer's piano music given splendid orchestral form by one of America's most famous and successful 'coss-over' conductors, equally at home in the classics as in Broadway show-tunes and popular hits



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lII3VI8K0K8
    Stokowski made a 5-movement Suite of various pieces by Purcell of which the most celebrated is "When I am Laid in Earth" from 'Dido and Aeneas.' It is played here by the Brussels Philharmonic in a splendid Tribute CD to Stokowski by Richard Egarr who admires the great maestro immensely. The whole CD is well worth acquiring by Stokowski collectors! It includes Bach, Palestrina and Cesti arrangements, as well as Egarr's own version of Handel's 'Water Music' Suite.




    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=67t9PFMNxrI
    Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor has been orchestrated many times, with Leopold Stokowski's version being the most famous and Sir Henry Wood's the most over-the-top. At the other extreme from both of those is the one made by Alois Melichar, an Austrian composer / conductor who made many recordings for Polydor in the 1930s. His light-weight arrangement of Bach's organ masterwork was recorded in 1939 with the Berlin Philharmonic and is heard here in a transfer by Mark Obert-Thorn for the Biddulph label.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lV67Ic3BTrU
    There have been several orchestral versions of Bach's mighty Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor, notably those by Respighi and Stokowski. Here is another colourful transcription to add to the list. Sir Andrew Davis conducted his own arrangement for the first time with the San Francisco Symphony in 2004. The performance uploaded here took place when Sir Andrew and the BBC Symphony Orchestra visited Bad Kissingen in Germany and is taken from the radio broadcast of 11 May 2006 with all due acknowledgements. Incidentally, the video features a few pictures of Bad Kissingen itself. It might also be noted that at just over 11 minutes, this is one of the speediest Passacaglia and Fugues around!



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3L2WslT1gZE
    In 1972, Leopold Stokowski, then aged 90, gave a concert with the American Symphony Orchestra da Camera at New York's Town Hall. For an encore, he turned to the audience and told them that when he was a student he had composed something and would they like to hear it, providing they weren't in a critical mood. Someone called out "Play it!" so Stokowski delighted the audience with this little piece for strings, which he entitled 'Reverie,' and thanked the audience at the end for their politeness!



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wXr2R5OsMh0
    Here is a real rarity! In his youthful years, Leopold Stokowski composed several pieces of music, including a 'Symphony.' Unfortunately, the full score of this work went missing or was stolen from his library many years ago. However, a set of orchestral parts for Movements I and II survived and it was from these that a new full score was reconstructed after his death.

    There is no extant documentation about this work, so it is only speculation as to how, when or where it came about. For example, it could have been a student exercise in orchestration dating from his time at London's Royal College of Music. However, it is more likely that it was composed after he'd arrived in America in 1905 to become organist and choirmaster at St. Bartholomew's Church in New York City prior to taking over the Cincinnati Orchestra in 1909.

    It is also not clear without the original full score if there were to be more movements, nor indeed if Stokowski ever gave Movements I and II a 'read-through' once he'd become an orchestral conductor. Still, what remains is a very interesting work of about 15 minutes which, although not deserving the word 'Symphony,' shows that Stokowski, even at the start of his career, had a sure command of large instrumental forces. It is a kind of mini-tone poem with many evocative orchestral effects and when it had its first public performance in 2009, given by the Royal College of Music Sinfonietta under Robin O'Neill, critic Colin Anderson wrote that it was "an atmospheric piece, suggesting Debussy and Chausson, with an ear to Wagner, a nod to Impressionism, and ideas suggesting Stravinsky and Rachmaninov."

    Lewis Foreman also commented on its "wonderful, brooding atmosphere," adding that "if it was written after the outbreak of the First World War it would have to count as one of the great war works with all those muted trumpets (bugles?) and tolling bells sounding over desolate landscapes."

    Here then is Stokowski's 'Symphony' in its first professional performance and first radio broadcast, given by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, conductor Roberto Minczuk, on 18 June 2013. It should be noted that due to their brevity there is no pause between the two movements, so that it effectively emerges as a continuous piece.





    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ImFFV3q_o-c
    In 1917, Sir Thomas Beecham conducted an extraordinary double-bill at the Theatre Royal, Drury Lane, London, which consisted of Puccini's "La Boheme" followed by an operatic production of Bach's Cantata "Phoebus and Pan." Evidently many members of the audience failed to stay the course, so they missed out on what one critic described as the "light serenity" of the Bach production that was heightened by the inclusion of a 20-minute ballet sequence.

    For this dance segment, Beecham commissioned Eugene Goossens, his young assistant conductor, to orchestrate Bach's French Suite in G for Harpsichord (BWV 816). It consists entirely of dance movements so was a highly appropriate interpolation, particularly as Goossens' arrangements turned out to be quite delightful. However, he changed their running order and replaced the "Loure" in Bach's 5th French Suite with the "Menuet" in the 3rd.

    Goossens did in fact make a single 12" 78rpm disc of some of the movements, heavily abridged to fit the two sides, with the London Symphony Orchestra in 1931. However, his Suite in G was broadcast in its entirety some years ago and is heard here in that performance played by the BBC Symphony Orchestra under Leonard Slatkin, its then Chief Conductor.

    The movements are (i) Courante; (ii) Allemande; (iii) Bourée; (iv) Menuet; (v) Gavotte; (vi) Sarabande; (vii) Gigue.

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    Is that Stoki/Stravinsky recording the Fantasia edit of Rite of Spring? If so, I don't see any reason for the edit to exist without the visuals. Stoki never performed it in concerts that way. He followed Stravinsky's score as far as I know. No transcription there.

    Also, it's odd how Bach gets such short shrift on that album cover.
    Last edited by bigshot; Apr-05-2014 at 22:28.

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    Quote Originally Posted by bigshot View Post
    Is that Stoki/Stravinsky recording the Fantasia edit of Rite of Spring?

    Also, it's odd how Bach gets such short shrift on that album cover.
    Booklet notes say its the 1947 revised version. No Stokowski tinkering/fiddling whatsoever on the Rite of Spring (for this DG recording).

    Since this is the regular Bachowski orchestrations, it's understandable that Bach gets little attention on the cover (quite unfairly IMO).
    Last edited by Aggelos; Apr-08-2014 at 12:17.

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    How are the performances of the Bach transcriptions on that recording? I love the StokiBach, but the recordings by Sawallisch with the Philadelphia were as bland as warm milk. Bambert/BBC was OK, but no one seems to do Stoki like Stoki.

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    For me the Matthias Bamert series on Chandos is my personal favourite, except for their first entry (Symphonic Bach Vol 1). As a whole, the series is unparalleled! For some reason Bach Vol 1 felt somehow tepid and lukewarm, perhaps Bamert was somehow restrained and cautious on his handling of the Stokowski transcriptions. But the other 5 discs of the series were fantastic with lovely engineering.
    I wish there were more form Chandos.

    As for Yannick Nezet-Seguin and his renditions of the Stokowski transcriptions, I think the outcome is very pleasing and jolly gratifying. And the engineering is stupendous, it provides a rich, lush and detailed sound.
    I think that if one loves Bachowski, this disc should be purchased without any second thoughts.
    I definitely prefer this to Serebrier's efforts on Naxos ( the engineering was mediocre there)


    The two reviewers seem to argue about the value of this disc...
    http://audaud.com/2013/12/stravinsky...et-seguin-dgg/
    http://www.classical.net/music/recs/...dgg791074a.php
    Last edited by Aggelos; Apr-11-2014 at 16:10.

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    Senior Member MoonlightSonata's Avatar
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    Who do you think is the greatest orchestrator ever? I think Ravel.

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    I heard many times a version of toccata & fugue in d minor for full orchestra it sounded better than the organ version.

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    Two orchestrations for Bach's Chaconne (Mvt. 5 from Partita for solo violin No. 2 in D minor) by Natan Rakhlin and Pavel Rivilis.

    Bach / Natan Rakhlin : Chaconne
    www.youtube.com/watch?v=qyS38VvS7OI‎
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natan_Rakhlin


    Bach / Pavel Rivilis : Chaconne (инструментовка «Чаконы» И.-С. Баха для симфонического оркестра)
    http://classic-online.ru/ru/production/52151

    http://ru.wikipedia.org/wiki/%D0%A0%...B2%D0%B8%D1%87

    http://old.rsl.ru/view.jsp?f=1003&t=...2&ss=1003&ce=4
    Last edited by Aggelos; May-05-2014 at 13:41.

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    Bach-Cailliet 'Little Fugue' - Reiner conducts
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EZE_WEMHL4M
    Lucien Cailliet was a principal woodwind player with the Philadelphia Orchestra as well as a composer and arranger in his own right. He made many transcriptions for orchestra, including his own version of Mussorgsky's "Pictures at an Exhibition" as commissioned by Eugene Ormandy. His arrangement of Bach's "Little Fugue" in G minor is played here by the Pittsburgh Symphony in a 1946 78rpm recording, long out-of-copyright, conducted by Fritz Reiner. (From a Biddulph CD reissue )

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    Cool

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dF3Zz6MfV0k&
    Fritz Kreisler's 'Tambourin Chinois' for Violin and Piano was given superb orchestral colouring by the Australian composer / conductor / arranger Douglas Gamley. It is heard on a 1958 'Sinfonia of London' LP entitled "Philharmonic Pops" in which he shared the conducting honours with Robert Irving. Apologies incidentally for the clicks but this LP seems not yet to have been transferred to CD!


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8XmeEkrFp4
    This Stokowski transcription is of the 'Adagio' from Bach's Toccata, Adagio and Fugue in C major (BWV 564). It is played by the Sydney Symphony Orchestra under Robert Pikler and comes from a 1982 Chandos Records CD.



    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oBSlM5UpBKQ
    In Gluck's opera "Armide," the sorceress of the title is in love with a knight of the First Crusade who, in Armide's enchanted castle, is serenaded by this pastoral 'Sicilienne.' In the opera, this music is played by a solo flute and pizzicatio strings. In Stokowski's 1957 recording heard here, it is arranged for strings only, playing arco not pizzicato.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8fVn5Ft4JRw
    "June" from Tchaikovsky's piano suite 'The Seasons' (also known as 'The Months') is sub-titled 'Barcarolle' and is played here in Alexander Gauk's orchestration by the Detroit Symphony under Neeme Jarvi.
    The 'character pieces' in Tchaikovsky's set are accompanied by 'poetic epigraphs,' of which the following is the one for 'June':
    "Let us go to the shore; there the waves will kiss our feet.
    With mysterious sadness the stars will shine down on us."


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FJrsKys3Zc4
    Johann Mattheson (1681-1764) was an exact contemporary of J. S. Bach though he is less well-known today. Jose Serebrier, Stokowski's one-time Associate Conductor, recorded two CDs of Stokowski's Bach Transcriptions and also included several of the Maestro's arrangements of other baroque composers. From the second CD we hear a sublime 'Air' from Mattheson's Harpsichord Suite No. 5, beautifully arranged and played by the Bournemouth Symphony under Serebrier's sensitive direction.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8plxqEs23uk
    From the 1958 LP 'Philharmonic Pops' we hear a brief burst of can-can music from the Leonide Massine ballet "Gaitie Parisienne." It is in Manuel Rosenthal's orchestration of music from Offenbach's operetta "La Vie Parisienne." Robert Irving conducts the Sinfonia of London.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZczGh6tHVNE
    Albeniz's 'El Corpus en Sevilla' comes from his solo piano suite "Iberia" and also has the alternative title 'Fête-dieu à Seville.' It was orchestrated by Enrique Arbos and also by Leopold Stokowski, who recorded his own version on a 78rpm disc in 1928 with the Philadelphia Orchestra. At that time, Artur Rodzinski was Stokowski's assistant conductor and when he came to record this same piece himself in 1958 with the Royal Philharmonic, he opted for Stokowski's transcription. Unaccountably, the original LP and the EMI CD reissue (heard here) credited Arbos with the arrangement, not Stokowski, so this upload duly puts the record straight!


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yBrhAe7Bi3g
    Vaughan Williams from the USA in this lively 'Phase 4 Stereo' recording from 1978 by the Boston 'Pops' Orchestra under its long-time conductor Arthur Fiedler. The three short movements are 'Seventeen Come Sunday,' My Bonny Boy' and 'Folk Songs from Somerset.' Originally composed for military band, it was arranged for symphony orchestra in 1924 by Gordon Jacob, one of Vaughan Williams's pupils.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=taqqY3R1sWc
    This is the Chorale 'Jesus Christus, Gottes Sohn' from Bach's "Easter Cantata" as transcribed by Leopold Stokowski and played by the BBC Philharmonic under his one-time Assistant Conductor, Matthias Bamert. It comes from a 'Bach Transcriptions' Chandos CD.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O9N90WdU36w
    From a 'Full Dimension Stereo Sound' recording entitled "La Belle France," made in 1957 but still sounding pretty spectacular even today, we hear Jose Padillo's "Paree!" played by the Capitol Symphony Orchestra under arranger / conductor Carmen Dragon. It comes from a CD reissue on the Pristine Audio label that also includes another sonically splendid Carmen Dragon LP entitled "L'Italia."





    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=idNJaLp6n0U
    In 1972, Leopold Stokowski visited Prague to conduct two concerts with the Czech Philharmonic. By now a very frail 90-year-old, the Maestro's taxing programme (played on two successive evenings) consisted of six of his Bach Transcriptions, followed after the interval by Elgar's "Enigma Variations" and Scriabin's "Poem of Ecstasy," plus a couple of encores. It was recorded 'live' in 'Phase 4 Stereo' and for the first concert the TV cameras were on hand to capture Stokowski for almost the last time in his long career.
    The programme opened with his own transcription of Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor, a work he had first performed and recorded in the 1920s. He had played it many times over the years but this is the last film to show him conducting his most famous Bach arrangement in public.
    Stokowski soon gave up concerts altogether, due to his clearly evident frailty, but continued to make records until he was 95. His final studio recording of the Toccata and Fugue in D minor was made with the London Symphony Orchestra in 1974 for RCA / BMG.




    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SqD9zB4TjXw
    For a Proms concert in London's Royal Albert Hall in 1991, Leonard Slatkin introduced his own edition of Mussorgsky's 'Pictures at an Exhibition.' It featured the various 'Promenades' and 'Pictures' in different arrangements by an assortment of orchestrators. Ravel's version is the best known but other arrangers of Mussorgsky's piano work were Leopold Stokowski, Sir Henry Wood, Vladimir Ashkenazy, Mikhail Tushmalov, Lawrence Leonard, Lucien Cailliet, Sergei Gorchakov and Leonidas Leonardi (Leonidas yay!!) , all of whom were featured in Slatkin's performance. As an encore, he brought the house down with Sir Henry Wood's version of 'The Great Gate of Kiev.'
    The television relay of the concert was preceded by a short documentary which featured Slatkin discussing the work with pianist Joanna MacGregor, as well as contributions from Vladimir Ashkenazy and Lawrence Leonard, two of the arrangers featured in his compendium.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AQcJHk6b7PM
    Sir Henry Wood's "Suite No. 6" was devised as a kind of successor to J. S. Bach's own Orchestral Suites. Its six movements come from a variety of sources and the first of them is the Prelude in C sharp minor from Book 1 of the Well-Tempered Clavier. Wood's scoring is fleet and gossamer and rather suggestive of Mendelssohn. This track comes from Leonard Slatkin's Chandos CD of Bach arrangements made by assorted conductors.





    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e0FE6vdJn2o
    In this delightful recording of the 'Italian Concerto,' Bach has been taken at his word. Conductor Yoav Talmi has retained the harpsichord orginal and added scintillating orchestral colouring around it. As a 'sampler,' here is the final movement "Presto" in the recording made on the 'Atma Classique' label in which Alexander Weimann is the keyboard soloist and the Orchestre Symphonique de Quebec is conducted by the arranger.

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    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HOAx4Wa8nFU
    This piece comes from a set of 'Spanish Dances' for solo piano by Enrique Granados, here glitteringly orchestrated by Douglas Gamley. He conducts the National Philharmonic on a Readers Digest LP.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7mQ1m9cj7MQ
    Carmen Dragon conducts the Capitol Symphony in his own arrangement of Leoncavallo's celebrated song 'Mattinata.' For those who wish to 'sing along' the words are down below. This track comes from an LP issued in 1958.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ngFwg8hHypk
    Rachmaninoff's most famous piano Prelude was orchestrated by Sir Malcolm Sargent and recorded in 1931 by the London Symphony in the Queen's Hall (shown in the video but blitzed during World War 2). This rare 78rpm disc has now made its CD debut on the 'Guild Historical' label in all-Rachmaninoff programme that includes a superb account of the 2nd Piano Concerto played by Cyril Smith (GHCD 2423).


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=w-giOYpHeps
    In 1969, Stokowski conducted the Saarbrucken Radio Symphony in a TV studio concert that included his own transcription of Bach's Passacaglia and Fugue in C minor. As a young student he had spent many summers in Germany where he studied conducting under Artur Nikisch and attended the rehearsals of Mahler's 8th Symphony, a work he introduced to America several years later. He retained his command of the German language even at the age of 87, as here, after many years spent in America. The complete performance has also been uploaded here.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o8GB72aTf24
    Brahms's Hungarian Dance No. 1 in G minor was provided with a dashing new orchestration by Don Banks for a 1958 LP entitled "Philharmonic Pops" on which the Sinfonia of London was conducted by Robert Irving.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pf3zJmNiCqk
    Ravel's "Five O'Clock Foxtrot" comes from his opera "L'enfant et les sortileges" and is played here in a delicious orchestration by Christopher Palmer. Geoffrey Simon conducts the Philharmonia on a Cala CD (CACDS4027).


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7EJlyXbhnUc
    Although Ravel's orchestration of Mussorgsky's solo piano work 'Pictures at an Exhibition' remains top of a very long list of its arrangements, Stokowski's is a strong follow-up and often a second choice amongst many conductors. Here is an excerpt from a recent CD of Stokowski's version splendidly played by the Japan Philharmonic under Kazuki Yamada. Curiously, in 'The Old Castle', the score asks for a cor anglais to play the main solo part but Stokowski, in an apparent nod to Ravel, also suggests a saxophone as an alternative. It is that instrument which Yamada chooses in his performance as heard here. (From 'Exton' OVCL-00489 with all due acknowledgments).


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mkpp6NKrWYI
    For the finale of a patriotic war-time musical entitled "Thousands Cheer," MGM re-used a vocal number that Shostakovich had originally written for a 1932 Soviet film called "Counterplan." In the 1943 Hollywood movie it was given a new title "United Nations on the March" and sung by Kathryn Grayson and a large chorus. Leopold Stokowski, a staunch champion of Shostakovich, immediately arranged it as a purely orchestral "March" for general concert use. In 1954, during the United Nations Day celebrations in New York, Stokowski's version was played by the Symphony of the Air conducted by Hugh Ross. That same performance is heard here, with the Schola Cantorum joining in lustily at the end, singing Harold J. Rome's lyrics.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CsYKl-19K9g
    Sir Edward Elgar's superb orchestration of Bach's Fantasia and Fugue in C minor was a highlight of the Last Night of the 2000 Proms at the Royal Albert Hall, London. Sir Andrew Davis conducted the BBC Symphony Orchestra.



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KEuKRJup_a4
    In 1960, Leopold Stokowski and the New York Philharmonic gave the US Premiere of the 'Symphonic Suite on Azerbaijan Folk Tunes' by Fikret Amirov. Two days later came the work's first American broadcast, newly released on a 'Guild' CD, and from it we hear Stokowski conducting the first of its four colourful movements. Also on the programme was Shostakovich's 1st Symphony and both works, along with music by Vaughan Williams and Robert Kurka, are on this splendidly recorded collection ('Guild Historical' GHCD 2415).

    The entire Azerbaijan suite as conducted by Niyazi
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bJ55hgy8udE

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