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Thread: Any Flutists here?

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    Default Any Flutists here?

    Can anyone here play flute? Are any of you professional?

    Who agrees that the flute is the coolest and hardest woodwind instrument?
    "Music is an art, and art is forever. Music should not succumb to fashion, which is passing and forgotten."
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    Senior Member Weston's Avatar
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    I don't play flute (though I would love to), I just wanted to thank you for not using the pretentious spelling "flautist."

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    Quote Originally Posted by Weston View Post
    I don't play flute (though I would love to), I just wanted to thank you for not using the pretentious spelling "flautist."
    Indeed! I've been told by people "It's flautist, not flutist!" but they don't even play flute themselves. I looked up the history on the word "flutist," and it turns out to be an older word than "flautist," and more familiar to the English language. Also, I like to imagine that I'm closer the flute school of the French, whose word for it is Flûtiste.
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    I never noticed this thread till now!

    Looks like you're the only flautist here

    What's wrong with the word 'flautist'? I see both spellings - depends on context I guess. Many flutists are glass makers .... there is no confusion with the word 'flautist'. I suspect that 'flautist' has a more Germanic or northern European root, than the original Boehm derivation :P

    Who agrees that the flute is the coolest and hardest woodwind instrument?
    Yes I do. That'll be because of the sterling silver, platinum or gold - they conduct heat away, making it the coolest instrument...and the hardest to warm up!

    What repertoire are you playing btw?

    I've discovered some interesting flute repertoire of late. Isang Yun's Salomo, Alain Louvier's Premande;
    André Jolivet's Incantation 'Pour que 'image devienne symbole' and Rob Goorhuis's 'Canto per flautonne'. I'm sorely out of practice though its not like you can find such repertoire on CD so that's one advantage of playing it. Sheet music is friggin' expensive though! Sariaaho's solo flute score alone costs around £20....Jindrich Feld's solo flute sonatas cost around £55!!!

    I do like picking it up again to play (when I can), although I'm no longer performing so it's kind of a sore spot to be reminded that *I used* to be able to play concert flute, but can no longer tell the difference between my embouchure and my uh...um .... heh

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    Default Flute

    Quote Originally Posted by Head_case View Post
    Yes I do. That'll be because of the sterling silver, platinum or gold - they conduct heat away, making it the coolest instrument...and the hardest to warm up!

    What repertoire are you playing btw?
    HA! I hadn't thought of it that way... My vagueness got me again (it's happened before)

    I would argue that the flute is coolest and hardest to play (I'm sure you knew that's what I meant). First, the flute is a very virtuosic instrument that can do highly technical things: double tonguing, flutter tonguing, notes in the stratosphere, etc. Second, we have the 60/40 proportion with our air (which is ideal actually), that 60% of air gets into the instrument, and 40% blows across. So we probably have the hardest time with air, even more than brass. Third, we get the most awesome solos, the only rival being clarinet.

    Altogether, the flutist always has some pretty big expectations.

    I want to be a performance major (I'm a senior in high school), so right now I'm working on my college audition repertoire:
    • Bach: Sonata no.1
    • Mozart: Concerto no. 1
    • Griffes: Poem <3
    • 5 Orchestral excerpts: Beethoven, Brahms, Debussy, Hindemith, Mendelssohn.
    • Hoover: Kokopeli (solo flute)
    • 2 Etudes, for a State school


    My ideal place is Eastman, so I'm gonna work really really hard to play that music well.

    By the way "Huilunsoittaja" is "Flutist" in Finnish (I'm of Finnish descent).
    Last edited by Huilunsoittaja; Sep-04-2010 at 00:01.
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    That's true you know .... most people can make a sound, terrible or not, from any musical instrument. A flute takes some skill to produce an even sound, before you can even progress to control the sound during the flow of music.

    My friends tell me that playing the piano is hard (because of the left and right hand multi-tasking requirement for chord playing whilst reading bass clef for the left hand, and treble clef for the right hand). I remember struggling with this for a month or two before growing into it. I guess there is a parallel for drummers, who have to beat one rhythm with one hand, and a syncopated rhythm with the other.

    Totally agree about the control of the character of the pitch of the music played by the flute: on the piano, there is no equivalent of double tonguing, flutter tonguing (whereas on proper stringed instruments, like the guitar, violin, cello - the character of the pitch can be controlled through technique). I'm not sure I've ever been impressed by any attempt at vibrato on piano either. Just the echo pedal and the fabric softener pedal to control the 'thunk' 'thunk' 'plonk!' of the piano pitches.

    Yeah - we do have a hard time with air. I'm not a huge fan of the B flat instruments like the clarinet. The oboe maybe sounds ... too mellow? for my taste. It's too smooth ... too homogenous. ... a bit like the piano as an instrument. That quality alone would make it very desirable for many though. Reed instruments don't appeal to me - I dislike changing reeds! The clarinet keying is also weird lol.

    Your repertoire is different from ours in the UK: I know the Bach & Mozart pieces *and Concerto No.2). In school we mostly learnt baroque pieces and majored on the conventional stuff - like Haydn's Serenade, Handel's Sonatas. I haven't seen the score for Hoover's Kokopeli before although we have some fabulous specialist music stores here which can unearth just about any score (at a price )

    When are we going to see you perform on You tubes then?!

    You must be of a great standard if you're heading in for college auditioning. I never kept my instrument up by the time I was 17, all I wanted to do was study philosophy in a quiet library, rather than blow hot air at the flute lol

    Well thanks for your post - it's reminded me of how much I used to love it.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Head_case View Post
    Your repertoire is different from ours in the UK: I know the Bach & Mozart pieces *and Concerto No.2). In school we mostly learnt baroque pieces and majored on the conventional stuff - like Haydn's Serenade, Handel's Sonatas. I haven't seen the score for Hoover's Kokopeli before although we have some fabulous specialist music stores here which can unearth just about any score (at a price )

    When are we going to see you perform on You tubes then?!
    Long time ago, I learned the Hayden's Serenade, and several Handel Sonatas (I did those for some local adjudications). But I've increased the level of difficulty of the solos I do now. Kokopeli is by a contemporary American composer, so I'm not surprised you haven't heard of it. Its inspiration comes from Native American legend, of the great flute player Kokopeli, whose flute could be heard echoing in the canyons. I chose this a capella solo over Syrinx by Debussy because it's more contrasting to the other works I'm doing now.

    I have actually posted one video of myself on youtube
    This is not to show off. Personally I think this one of the greatest flute solos ever written, and there are plenty other better recordings on youtube of it.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BM4XlFaxiqg

    And I guess you'll find out my name too there, but I'll trust you with it
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    Oooh!

    That's a lovely piece! You really project the flute so well into the orchestra!

    I like the anxiety driven lyricism in the flute's colourful lines.

    Yes - I'm sure the Haydn Serenade and Handel Sonatas are more suited to flutists around 4ft nothing

    Do you have the score for the Kokopeli piece? Who is the publisher?

    Debussy's Syrinx is rather boring to play, especially if like me you keep messing it up after 1 minute of the 2 minute and 2 second wake up call

    Lovely to hear your work - no wonder you're trying to get into a musical establishment - I want an autographed CD of your flute solos when it comes out



    PS - which flute brand are you using?

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    Quote Originally Posted by Head_case View Post
    I like the anxiety driven lyricism in the flute's colourful lines.

    Do you have the score for the Kokopeli piece? Who is the publisher?

    Lovely to hear your work - no wonder you're trying to get into a musical establishment - I want an autographed CD of your flute solos when it comes out

    PS - which flute brand are you using?
    Yes, I agree the Poem has many times where it's very anxious, sad, even angry. I love it so much, that's why I'm gonna do it for college. That performance was a reward I got for winning a particular competition with that solo.

    The publisher is Papagena Press. It can be found on fluteworld.com

    I will keep you in mind, sir... honestly. I don't know where I'll end up in the next 10 years... but who knows

    The flute I use is an Altus 807. Altus is a Japanese company that makes hand-made flutes. The 807 is a semi-professional level flute, but soon I may get an upgrade headjoint so it would be professional level.
    "Music is an art, and art is forever. Music should not succumb to fashion, which is passing and forgotten."
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    hello everybody,

    i know i'm out of topic but i'm a flute player and you too...so you can help me...does anyone of you know a pianist?

    thanks, m

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    I play the native American flute,most especially Anasazi,Mojave and Hopi rim blown versions.

    Jim

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huilunsoittaja View Post
    Yes, I agree the Poem has many times where it's very anxious, sad, even angry. I love it so much, that's why I'm gonna do it for college. That performance was a reward I got for winning a particular competition with that solo.

    The publisher is Papagena Press. It can be found on fluteworld.com

    I will keep you in mind, sir... honestly. I don't know where I'll end up in the next 10 years... but who knows

    The flute I use is an Altus 807. Altus is a Japanese company that makes hand-made flutes. The 807 is a semi-professional level flute, but soon I may get an upgrade headjoint so it would be professional level.
    Thanks for that. It's a very rich piece - even more stunning to hear you play so beautifully!

    I'll look into my local stores for scores. They are fairly expensive over here. Like your Altus lol.

    I'm happy with the TJ Virtuoso. I don't think I'll sound significantly better with a more expensive flute!

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    Quote Originally Posted by Huilunsoittaja View Post
    First, the flute is a very virtuosic instrument that can do highly technical things: double tonguing, flutter tonguing, ...

    Since I do not play the flute, I hope that you will excuse my ignorance. Watching fl[a]utists play, it seems to me that the player blows onto the edge of the hole in the instrument from some distance. If this impression of mine is correct, how does tonguing come into the picture?

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    Quote Originally Posted by AmateurComposer View Post
    Since I do not play the flute, I hope that you will excuse my ignorance. Watching fl[a]utists play, it seems to me that the player blows onto the edge of the hole in the instrument from some distance. If this impression of mine is correct, how does tonguing come into the picture?
    Woah! really? No, the mouth piece rests right on the chin below the lips. It may be an optical illusion if the flutist plays with the mouth piece rolled in a lot, which I do now.

    Air is blown into the mouth piece from an angle so that it hits the back of the inside of the head joint, which vibrates through the tube as a result. I think. It makes tonguing very easy, because there's no reed or huge amount of pressure put directly on the lips.
    "Music is an art, and art is forever. Music should not succumb to fashion, which is passing and forgotten."
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    Quote Originally Posted by Huilunsoittaja View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by AmateurComposer View Post
    Since I do not play the flute, I hope that you will excuse my ignorance. Watching fl[a]utists play, it seems to me that the player blows onto the edge of the hole in the instrument from some distance. If this impression of mine is correct, how does tonguing come into the picture?
    Woah! really? No, the mouth piece rests right on the chin below the lips. It may be an optical illusion if the flutist plays with the mouth piece rolled in a lot, which I do now.

    Air is blown into the mouth piece from an angle so that it hits the back of the inside of the head joint, which vibrates through the tube as a result. I think. It makes tonguing very easy, because there's no reed or huge amount of pressure put directly on the lips.

    Thank you very much for your response, but you did not answer my question, maybe because you take for granted as obvious exactly what I do not understand. So, please, let me further elaborate on my question.

    If I correctly understand, tonguing in the case of a reed instrument means that the tongue touches the reed in order to to block the air flow. In the case of the flute, since the lips do not touch the opening in the mouth piece, what is the action of the tongue during tonguing?

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